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Full text of "Milligan College Catalog, 2007-2008"


purpose 





catalog 2007-08 



JEx 



Milligan College 



Academic excellence since 1866 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/milligancollegec2007mill 



mission 1 



OUR MISSION 

As a Christian liberal arts college, Milligan College 

seeks to honor God by educating men and women 

to be servant-leaders. 

Milligan College offers programs of study leading to undergraduate or graduate degrees. These programs 
have as their objectives the following: 

A Positive, Personal Christian Faith That Jesus is Lord and Savior 

The expression "Jesus is Lord and Savior" is to be understood in its historical, biblical significance. Jesus, 
the Man of Nazareth, is God's Son, therefore, both Savior and Lord of Life. The attainment of positive, 
personal Christian faith means the commitment of one's life to this Jesus. 

A Commitment to Follow the Teachings of the 

Christian Scripture in One's Personal and Social Ethics 

This commitment involves a recognition of the norms of human conduct that derive their sanction from the 

Christian faith. 

The Capacity to Recognize and Assume Responsibility in Society 

The main functions of education are to arouse within the individual an awareness of indebtedness to one's 
fellow human beings, to foster in each a desire to assume personal responsibility, and to prepare the 
individual to fulfill his or her obligation to society. 

The Knowledge, Meaning and Application of Sound Scholarship 

The student is led to develop a respect and enthusiasm for sound scholarship and to seek it with diligence 
and perseverance. 

Preparation for Securing an Enriched Quality of Life for Self and Family 

Courses of study and campus life are designed to develop the quality of aesthetic appreciation, to provide 
a background in the liberal arts, and to lead to the selection of a field of interest which will provide 
opportunities for a fulfilling life. 

Participation in the Activities of a Healthy Lifestyle 

This may be accomplished through intramural and intercollegiate sports, residence hall living, campus 
fellowship and other student activities. 



Milligan 
college 



I Acai 



Academic excellence since 1866 






milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www milligan.edu 



2 academic calendar 



Academic Calendar 



Contact Information 



Fall Semester 2007 

August 1 8 Residence Halls Open to New Students 

August 1 8 Conference for Families of New Students 

August 1 8 (evening) Matriculation of New Students 

August 18 -21 New Student Orientation 

August 19 Residence Halls Open to Returning Students 

August 20 (8:30 a.m.) Faculty Worship Service 

August 20 - 21 "Advising, Mentoring, and Registration 

August 22 Classes Begin 

October 4-5 Fall Break 

November 21 , 22, 23 Thanksgiving Holidays 

November 26* Classes resume at 4:00 p.m. 

December 7 Last Day of Classes 

December 10-13 Final Examinations 

December 14 Commencement 

Spring Semester 2008 

January Term 

January 7 - 12 

Spring Term 
January 13 



Office of Enrollment Management 

Inquiries concerning admission to the college should be directed to: 



Classes begin; classes end 



Residence Halls Open to New Students 

and Returning Students 
January 14 New Student Orientation 

January 14-15 "Advising, Mentoring, and Registration 

January 16 Classes Begin 

January 22 Martin Luther King Jr. Service Day 

March 3-7 Spring Break 

March 21 - 24 Easter Break; classes resume at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, March 

25 
April 24 Awards Convocation 

May 2 Last Day of Classes 

May 5-8 Final Examinations 

May 10 Commencement 

Summer Session 2008 



May 12-30 
May 27 
June 2-27 
June 30 -July 25 



May Term 

Registration and Orientation 
First Term Classes 
Second Term Classes 



•Classes meeting once a week on Monday and beginning no earlier than 4 p.m. 
* • All students must come to registration. 



About this Catalog 

This Catalog is published for the purpose of providing information about the 
College and its programs. Announcements contained herein are subject to 
change without notice and may not be regarded in the nature of binding 
obligations to the College. Milligan College reserves the right to change prices, 
curricula, policies, and practices as described in this Catalog as circumstances, 
efficiency of operations, and fiscal contingencies may require. 

Milligan College provides the opportunity for students to increase their 
knowledge by offering instruction in the various disciplines and programs 
through faculty who, in the opinion of Milligan College, are trained and qualified 
for teaching at the college level. However, the acquisition of knowledge by any 
student is contingent upon the student's desire to learn and the student's 
application of appropriate study techniques to any course or program. As a 
result, Milligan College docs not warrant or represent that any student who 
completes a course or program of study will necessarily acquire any specific 
knowledge, or skills, or will be able to pass or complete any specific examination 
for any course, degree, or license. 

Milligan College does not discriminate on the basis of age, disability, gender, 
color, national and ethnic origin, or political affiliation. 



Contact: 


Director of Enrollment Management 


Address: 


P.O. Box 210, Milligan College, TN 37682 


Location: 


Litde Hardand Welcome Center 


Phone: 


423.461.8730 or 800.262.8337 


Fax: 


423.461.8982 


Email: 


admissions@milligan.edu 


Web: 


www.milligan.edu 



Office of Student Financial Services 

Inquiries concerning financial aid or your student account should be directed to: 

Contact: Student Financial Services Office 

Address: P.O. Box 250, Milligan College, TN 37682 

Location: McCown Cottage, first floor 

Phone: 423.461 .8949 or 800.447.4880 

Fax: 423.929.2368 

Email: SFS@milligan.edu 

Web: www.milligan.edu/SFS 



Office of the Registrar 

Inquiries concerning transcripts, academic records, enrollment verification, and course 

offerings should be directed to: 

Contact: Registrar 

Address: P.O. Box 52, Milligan College, TN 37682 

Location: Derthick Hall 103 

Phone: 423.461.8788 

Fax: 423.461.8716 

Email: shskidmore@milligan.edu 

Web: www.milligan.edu 



Office of Residence Life 

Inquiries concerning residence halls or available housing should be directed to: 

Contact: Director of Residence Life 

Address: P.O. Box 500, Milligan College, TN 37682 

Location: McMahan Student Center, first floor 

Phone: 423.461.8760 

Fax: 423.461.8982 

Email: snefos@milligan.edu 

Web: www.milligan.edu 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



contents 3 



Contents 

Academic calendar : 2 

About this Catalog 2 

Contact information 2 

Profile 4 

Nature of the College 

Heritage 5 

Mission 6 

Goals 6 

Commitment to non-discrimination 7 

Accreditation and memberships 7 

Campus s 

Student Life and 
Services 

Residence life 9 

Campus activities and organizations 9 

Campus ministry 11 

Athletics 12 

Health services 1 1 

Federal laws and acts 12 

Student guidelines 13 

Admission 

Undergraduate Admission 14 

Financial Information 

Tuition and other basic charges 16 

Explanation of fees 17 

Financial registration policy 17 

Meal plan 17 

Payment 17 

Refund policy 18 

Textbooks 19 

Financial Aid 

General requirements for 

Tide IV financial aid 20 

Definition of terms 20 

Milligan College programs 20 

Tide IV Federal Financial Aid Satisfactory 

Academic Progress Policy 20 

Scholarship guidelines 21 

Scholarship/grant policies 22 

State programs 23 

Tennessee Lottery Scholarship 23 

Federal programs 24 

Disbursements of Financial Aid 24 

Financial aid for graduate students 24 

Financial aid application process 24 

Financial aid calendar 25 

Student rights and responsibilities 25 

Veterans education benefits 26 

Academic Policies 

General policies 27 

Advisers and mentors 27 

Campus communication 27 



Ceremony of matriculation 27 

Classification 27 

College calendar 27 

Correspondence credit 28 

Course repeat policy 28 

Grade reports 28 

Grading system (undergrad and grad) 28 

Graduation requirements 28 

Honors 28 

Information technology 28 

Disabilities 29 

Library services 30 

Probation and dismissal (undergraduate) . 30 

Spiritual formation 30 

Testing services (undergraduate students) 30 

Majors exam policy 30 

AP policy 31 

CLEP policy 31 

International Baccalaureate policy 32 

Testing services (undergrad students in non- 
traditional programs and grad students) 32 

Transfer credit policy 33 

Transcripts 33 

Withdrawal 33 

Academic Programs 

Baccalaureate degrees 34 

Graduate degrees 34 

General education requirements (GER) .. 35 

Computer literacy requirement 35 

Developmental studies 36 

Writing competency 36 

Tutoring 36 

Co-operative programs 36 

Off-campus programs 37 

Majors and minors 40 

Majors and minors by area 41 

Accounting 42 

Art 43 

Bible 45 

Biology 48 

Business Administration 50 

Business: M.B.A 53 

Business: Adult Degree Completion 56 

Chemistry 60 

Child and Youth Development 61 

Child and Youth Development:: 

Adult Degree Completion 63 

Children's Ministry 68 

Christian Ministry 69 

Coaching 70 

Communications 71 

Computer Information Systems 75 

Economics 77 

Education: licensure programs 78 

Education: M.Ed 86 

English 93 

Exercise Science 95 

Film Studies 95 

Fine Arts 96 

Fitness and Wellness 97 

French 98 

General Science 99 



Geography 99 

German 100 

Greek 100 

Health Care Administration 101 

Hebrew 101 

History 102 

Human Performance 

& Exercise Science 104 

Humanities 107 

Journalism 109 

Language Arts 110 

Legal Studies 110 

Mathematics 11 1 

Missions 113 

Music 114 

Nursing 120 

Occupational Therapy: M.S.O.T 124 

Philosophy 128 

Photography 128 

Physical Education 129 

Physical Science 130 

Physics 130 

Political Science 131 

Pre-Professional programs 132 

Psychology 132 

Public Leadership and Sendee 135 

Religion 137 

Sociology 137 

Spanish 139 

Theatre Arts 140 

Worship Leadership 141 

Worship Ministry 142 

Youth Ministry 143 

The Milligan 
Community 

Board of Trustees 144 

Board of Advisors 144 

Administration 145 

Regular ranked faculty 146 

Administrative faculty 147 

Adjunct faculty 148 

Faculty associates 149 

Scholarship Programs 
and Endowment Funds 

Endowed Chairs 149 

Foundational Endowments 149 

Named, Funded Scholarship Endow 150 

Index 

Index 152 

Campus Map 

Campus Map 154 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



4 profile 



College Profile 

Milligan College 

Four-year private Christian liberal arts college integrating academic 
excellence with a Christian world view. Consistcndy named one of 
"America's Best Colleges" by U.S. News & World Report. Milligan's 
mission is: As a Christian liberal arts college, Milligan College 
seeks to honor God by educating men and women to be servant- 
leaders. 

Academics 

Academic Program 

Milligan offers students a Christian liberal arts education in a 
community of inquiry, responsibility, and caring. The liberal arts are 
taught from a perspective of God's activity with humanity. The college's 
strong core curriculum educates students toward the world in an open 
and constructive way, to lead and to serve. 

Degrees Awarded 

More than 25 academic majors. Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Business Administration, 
Master of Education, Master of Science in Occupational Therapy. 

Accreditation 

Milligan College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, 
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; Telephone number 404-679-4501) to 
award bachelor's and master's degrees. Milligan's longstanding 
accreditation by SACS serves as a strong endorsement of the high 
quality of the college's programs and services. 

Faculty 

70 full-time faculty have career-based experience and more than 70 
percent have earned the highest degree in their field from graduate 
schools across the U.S. and abroad. Milligan's faculty and staff are 
unapologetically Christian. They are mature and caring Christian 
scholars who are committed to world-class scholarship, excellence in 
teaching, their Christian faith, and the faith development of their 
students. 

Student-Faculty Ratio 

A low student-faculty ratio offers personal attention and class sizes that 
typically range from 10-15 students. 



Student Life 

Student Body 

Milligan's 900 students come from more than 40 states and 10 nations. 

Residence Life 

81% of traditional students live on campus in one of six residence halls 
or student apartments, creating a true collegiate environment. Each 
residence hall has a resident director (RD) and trained undergraduate 
resident assistants (RA) to help students with self-government, 
counseling, and social and cultural programming. 



Clubs and Organizations 

More than 45 service, honorary, and professional organizations 
encourage servant leadership. 

Athletics 

Milligan is an athletic powerhouse in the Appalachian Athletic 
Conference (AAQ and National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics 
(NAIA), with 18 intercollegiate sports. Since 1995, Milligan has won 
more than 42 conference titles and made 48 national tournament 
appearances. In 2003, the college won its first national championship in 
the women's 5000 meters at the NAIA Indoor Track and Field National 
Championships. The college maintains high standards for its athletes 
and has produced numerous Ail-Americans, All-Conferences, and 
Academic AU-American players. Men's sports include baseball, 
basketball, cheerleading, cross country, golf, soccer, swimming, tennis, 
and track and field. Women's sports include basketball, cheerleading, 
cross country, soccer, Softball, swimming, tennis, track and field, and 
volleyball. 



Spiritual Life 

Church Affiliation 

Throughout its history Milligan College has maintained an active 
relationship to the Stone-Campbell movement of the 19th century (non- 
denominational Christian churches/churches of Christ) — a religious 
movement committed to the restoration of New Testament Christianity 
and the unity of all believers. 

Campus Ministry 

Students can participate in existing spiritual formation and discipleship 
activities such as chapel and vespers services, cross cultural mission 
trips, community service, spiritual renewal week, Bible studies, prayer 
vigils, retreats, devotional breakfasts, church leadership conferences, 
and fellowship of Christian athlete events. 

Calling 

Milligan's "Servant-Leader Experience" program is a comprehensive 
program encompassing the entire student experience. Through student 
life, spiritual life, and academic programs, the entire student experience 
at Milligan is designed to encourage students to reflect on how their 
faith is related to their career choices and what it means to be "called" 
to lives of service. 



Location and Facilities 

Milligan's 181 -acre picturesque campus is located in scenic northeast 
Tennessee, minutes from Johnson City in the dynamic Tri-Cities region. 
An All-America Region, the Tri-Cities is listed as one of the top 25-50 
metropolitan areas in the U.S. 

See page 8 for description of facilities. 

For more information about Milligan College, visit 
www.milligan.edu or call 800.262.8337. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



nature of the college 5 



Nature of the College 

The Milligan College tradition is expressed in the motto "Christian 
Education — the Hope of the World." The curriculum includes a study 
of the Holy Scriptures as a requirement for the bachelor's degree. This 
requirement derives from the belief that God is revealed in His only 
begotten Son, Jesus, the Christ. This belief gives meaning to human life 
and is the onlv force of sufficient moral strength to create educational 
ideals of the highest order and to inspire the integrity to achieve them. 

Milligan College has been coeducational from the beginning of its 
history. This policy rests upon the conviction that the problems of the 
entire social order are better solved when men and women share alike in 
basic knowledge. 

It is a distinguishing characteristic of Milligan College that each course 
is taught with an awareness of how it fits into a biblical worldview. Such 
teaching is assured by the selection of a faculty in cordial sympathy with 
this view. A primary objective is to include Christian understanding and 
practice in the total of life's attitudes and activities. 
Throughout its history Milligan College has maintained an active 
relationship to a religious movement committed to the restoration of 
New Testament Christianity. The Christian people participating in this 
movement consistently disclaim denominational status, and the faculty 
and trustees of the College maintain an intelligent awareness of a 
commitment to this position. The members of Milligan College feel that 
such a nondenominational position permits them to examine all aspects 
of life, secular and religious, in the light of the New Testament, 
unrestricted by human tradition. In this view of Christian faith, all 
vocations, avocations, and associations permitting the exercise of 
fellowship under the Lordship of Christ are expressions of good 
citizenship under God, in state, in church, and in society. In the Milligan 
College tradition students are confronted with a synthesis of learning. 
The College regards this synthesis of learning as essential to the 
understanding of and personal responsibility in the various relationships 
in life for the stewardship of which all must give account before God 
and humanity. 

It is a further significant characteristic that Milligan College believes this 
objective obtainable through the presentation of the data of Christianity 
in its original form, the New Testament. Accordingly, no 
denominational or creedal tests are imposed upon any student in 
admission to membership in Milligan College or in the attainment of 
any of its honors, awards, or degrees. 

The liberal arts are defined at Milligan College as those studies and 
disciplines through which the human spirit is freed and further 
endowed with moral power. The study of these arts is thus essential to 
the attainment and maintenance of a civilization of free people. Only 
those individuals who recognize the dignity and sanctity of human life 
can hold the concept of freedom. The possessor of that life, however, 
can enjoy the highest potential only through the disciplines of sound 
learning. This learning gives direction and meaning to life through time 
into eternity. A personality so equipped is the master of skills and facts, 
is never dominated by them, and uses them for the service of humanity 
and of God. 

Thus, the purpose of liberal education is the development of persons to 
whom may safely be entrusted the vast scientific and technical 
knowledge and skill developed by research. Such a program includes 
more than the pursuit of "secular" studies in a "Christian atmosphere." 
It contemplates the inter-penetration of the three great bodies of 
learning: the realm of nature, the realm of humanity, and the realm of 
divinity. The practical application of the resultant synthesis in both 
vocational and leisure activities characterizes the life of a truly educated 
person. 



Another characteristic of Milligan College is the sense of obligation 
assumed by the faculty. Applicants for admission to membership in 
Milligan College are considered in the light of this searching question: 
"What can we do for this student?" Therefore, with regard to each 
applicant who possesses adequate secondary education and expresses an 
acceptance of the approach described above, the College addresses itself 
to this question: "Has Milligan College sufficient facilities and 
understanding to realize the end product envisioned?" 

Membership in Milligan College consists of those who sustain a 
relationship in one of the following categories: the Board of Trustees, 
the Board of Advisors, the Administration, the Faculty, the Staff, the 
Student Body, and the Alumni. This membership is a privilege 
conferred by the Institution and involves reciprocal responsibilities and 
concerns. The College at its discretion through established channels 
extends admission to membership in any one of the divisions. 

Admission to membership in Milligan College carries with it a pledge of 
responsibility by students that they will subject themselves to the 
rigorous discipline of the above program. Men and women who choose 
to decline this responsibility forfeit the privilege of membership in the 
College. 



Heritage 



In the 1 830s, freedom-loving people introduced the Restoration 
principles into the religious life of East Tennessee. They established 
churches and schools. Milligan College owes its beginnings to the 
school conducted in the old Buffalo Church, which is now the 
Hopwood Memorial Church. 

On December 10, 1866, Wilson G. Barker established the Buffalo 
Male and Female Institute, a State of Tennessee chartered school. He 
constructed a building and instruction began the next year. In 1875, 
Josephus Hopwood, a native of Kentucky, assumed the leadership of 
this academy. 

In 1881 Hopwood announced both the elevation of the Institute to 
collegiate rank and the new name, Milligan College. He chose this name 
to honor Professor Robert Milligan of Kentucky University 
(Transylvania). President Hopwood regarded Milligan as the 
embodiment of Christian scholarship and Christian gentility. 

President Hopwood sought to establish a four-fold program in the 
College. He looked to the physical sciences as the source of the 
conquest of the earth. He regarded history, philosophy, and the social 
studies as the source of human self-knowledge and self-government. He 
thought of professional and vocational education as a means of 
sustaining a free social order and of reducing scientific knowledge to the 
service of humanity in material civilization. He accepted a knowledge of 
revelation and the possession of Christian faith as the necessary* controls 
through which one could establish and maintain a culture in blending 
the first three. To this end he adopted the motto, "Christian Education- 
the Hope of the World." 

President Hopwood continued in the presidency until 1903 when he left 
Milligan to found a college in Lynchburg, Virginia. From 1903 to 1915, 
Milligan had six presidents. In 1915 Dr. Hopwood, who had completed 
the founding of the colleges in Virginia and Georgia since leaving 
Milligan in 1 903, returned for a two-year interim presidency. 

In 1917 Henry J. Derthick was inaugurated as the eighth president of 
Milligan. During this period Milligan College served many young people 
from the Southern Highlands. The campus was expanded to some sixty 
acres, and the facilities of the College were increased. The 
Administration Building, now called Derthick Hall, was rebuilt after a 
fire. Dr. Derthick succeeded in bringing die College through the period 
of World War I and the Great Depression, preserving the academic 
integrity and quality of the College. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



mission 



Dean Charles E. Burns succeeded to the presidency in 1940, just prior 
to the American entrance into the Second World War. In the crisis of 
that period, Milligan offered its entire facilities to the United States 
Goi eminent From July of 1943 to the spring of 1945 a Navy V-12 
program was conducted. Milligan was the only college in the United 
States given over completely to a Navy program. 

The civilian work of the College was resumed under the presidency of 
Virgil Elliott in 1 945. Two major problems confronted the College at 
this time. The breaking of ties with alumni and friends during the 
Second World War proved to be a serious handicap. No less difficult 
was the task of assisting a large number of ex-GIs to effect a transition 
from military to civilian life. 

Dr. Dean E. Walker came to the presidency in January 1950 from a 
twenty-five year professorship at the Butler University School of 
Religion. Recognizing the need of the small college to play an 
increasingly large part in the educational program of the country, the 
College adopted a long-range development program. Students were 
enlisted from a larger area, encompassing most of the States and several 
foreign countries. During Dr. Walker's administration the campus was 
expanded to more than 135 acres of land. New buildings included the 
Student Union Building, Sutton Hall, Webb Hall, the P.H. Welshimer 
Memorial Library, the Seeger Memorial Chapel, and Hart Hall. 
On November 1, 1960 Milligan received the Quality Improvement 
Award administered by the Association of American Colleges for the 
United States Steel Foundation. On December 1, 1960, Milligan College 
was admitted into membership in the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools. 

In June 1 968, Dr. Jess W. Johnson, having served in the capacity of 
Executive Vice-President for two years, was elevated to the presidency 
of the College on the retirement of President Dean E. Walker. The 
campus continued to develop under Dr. Johnson's leadership. The 
College constructed the following buildings: The Faculty Office 
Building (1969), the Science Building (1972), and the Steve Lacy 
Fieldhouse (1976). 

On January 1, 1982, Marshall J. Leggett, the first alumnus to be 
chosen for the position, became the thirteenth president of the College. 
During his tenure, the College offered its first master's degree, the 
Master of Education. The College constructed the McMahan Student 
Center (1987) and renovated the old student union building as Paxson 
Communication Center. The College renovated the upper level of 
Hardin Hall to house the Arnold Nursing Science Center. Quillen, 
Kegley, and Williams Halls were built. During Dr. Leggett's tenure, 
enrollment increased 31%. Dr. Leggett retired on June 30, 1997, and 
became Chancellor. 

Donald R. Jeanes, a Milligan alumnus, became the fourteenth 
president onjuly 1, 1997. Under his leadership, the College has 
continued its momentum. The master's program in occupational 
therapy enrolled its first class in August 1998. To accommodate this 
program addition, the lower level of Hardin Hall was renovated as the 
McGlothlin-Street Occupational Therapy Center (1998). The 
Occupational Therapy Program received professional accreditation in 
2000. The College renovated Derthick Hall and the Baker Faculty 
Office Building. The historic Alf Taylor house was renovated in 2003 
and renamed the Taylor/Phillips House; it is used as a campus guest 
house and reception center. The Nursing Program received professional 
accreditation in 2003; in February 2004, the College began its third 
master's degree program, the Master of Business Administration. The 
college acquired additional acreage adjacent to the campus in 2004, 
increasing its size to approximately 181 acres. The W. T. Mathes Tennis 
Complex was dedicated in 2005, and a new maintenance building was 
constructed. Construction of the Elizabeth Leitner Gregory Center for 
the Liberal Arts, a 290-seat theatre along with dark rooms for 
photography, should be completed fall 2007. 



Mission 

As a Christian liberal arts college, Milligan College seeks to 
honor God by educating men and women to be setrant- 
leaders. 

Milligan College offers programs of study leading to undergraduate or 
graduate degrees. These programs have as their objectives the following: 

A Positive, Personal Christian Faith That Jesus is Lord and Savior 

The expression "Jesus is Lord and Savior" is to be understood in its 
historical, biblical significance. Jesus, the Man of Nazareth, is God's 
Son, therefore, both Savior and Lord of Life. The attainment of 
positive, personal Christian faith means the commitment of one's life to 
this Jesus. 

A Commitment to Follow the Teachings of the Christian Scripture 
in One's Personal and Social Ethics 

This commitment involves a recognition of the norms of human 
conduct that derive their sanction from the Christian faith. 

The Capacity to Recognize and Assume Responsibility in Society 

The main functions of education are to arouse within the individual an 
awareness of indebtedness to one's fellow human beings, to foster in 
each a desire to assume personal responsibility, and to prepare the 
individual to fulfill his or her obligation to society. 

The Knowledge, Meaning, and Application of Sound Scholarship 

The student is led to develop a respect and enthusiasm for sound 
scholarship and to seek it with diligence and perseverance. 

Preparation for Securing an Enriched Quality of Life for Self and 
Family 

Courses of study and campus life are designed to develop the quality of 
aesthetic appreciation, to provide a background in the liberal arts, and to 
lead to the selection of a field of interest which will provide 
opportunities for a fulfilling life. 

Participation in the Activities of a Healthy Lifestyle 

This may be accomplished through intramural and intercollegiate sports, 
residence hall living, campus fellowship, and other student activities. 

Goals 

In endeavoring to achieve its Mission, Milligan College sets forth the 
following goals: 

■ Students will express the importance of their faith and the impact 
of Christian Scriptures in activities such as the following: written 
and oral discussions, participation in communities of faith, 
involvement in Bible studies, and faith-inspired service. 

■ Students will demonstrate social responsibility in numerous ways, 
such as serving in churches, on the mission field (domestic and 
foreign), and with social agencies; mentoring, nurturing, and 
protecting others; and displaying increased understanding of and 
experience with other cultures. 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



accreditation and memberships 



Students will participate in the activities of a healthy lifestyle such 
as intramurals, intercollegiate sports, musical and theatrical groups, 
student clubs, student government, and other campus-sponsored 
extracurricular endeavors, in preparation for life-long participation 
in similar activities. 

Students, faculty, staff, and administration will create a responsible 
and caring community by giving attention to the needs and 
concerns of one another. 



Commitment to Non-Discrimination 



COMMITMENT TO ALL PEOPLE 

As members of the Milligan College community and in faithfulness to 
the teaching of Scripture, we commit ourselves to honoring and 
broadening the diversity of our community and to treating every person 
with respect, dignity, and love. By reflecting the diversity of God's 
kingdom, the College bears witness to that kingdom and equips 
students to serve in a diverse and interdependent world. 

In accordance with the Age Discrimination Act, Title IX, and Section 
504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Milligan College does not discriminate on 
the basis of age, disability, gender, race, color, national and ethnic 
origin, or political affiliation in administration of its educational policies, 
admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and 
other school-administered programs. 
Concerns should be addressed to: 

Traci J. Smith, Director of Disability Services 

P.O. Box 500 

Milligan College, TN 37682 

tj smith@milligan.edu 

423.461.8981 



Accreditation and Memberships 

SACS: Milligan College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, 
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; 404-679-4501) to award bachelor's and 
master's degrees. 

NCATE: The education program at Milligan is accredited by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE)(2010 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC, 20036; 202- 
466-7496). This accreditation program covers initial teacher and 
advanced educator preparation programs. 

ACOTE: The occupational therapy program at Milligan College is 
accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapv 
Education (ACOTE), a division of The American Occupational 
Therapy Association (AOTA) (4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 
31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220; 800-652- AOTA). 

CCNE: The nursing program at Milligan College is accredited by the 
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) (One Dupont 
Circle, NW Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120, 202-887-6791). 
This accreditation covers the baccalaureate degree program. 

The College holds membership in the following professional 
organizations: 

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions 

Officers 

American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education 

American Association of Independent Liberal Arts Colleges of 

Teacher Education 

Appalachian Athletic Conference 

Appalachian College Association 

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education 

Council for Christian Colleges and Universities 

College Placement Council 

Council for Advancement and Support of Education 

Council of Independent Colleges 

National Association of College and University Business Offices 

National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities 

National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Tennessee Association of Colleges of Teacher Education 

Tennessee Association of Independent Liberal Arts Colleges of 

Teacher Education 

Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools 

Tennessee Council of Private Colleges 

Tennessee Deans and Directors of Nursing Programs (sponsored 

by the Tennessee Board of Nursing) 

Tennessee Foundation for Independent Colleges 

Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association 



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8 campus 



Campus 



MilJigan College occupies a campus of more than 181 acres, rising 
eastward from the banks of Buffalo Creek. Richly endowed by nature 
and enhanced by skillful landscaping, the grounds possess unusual 
beauty. 

Anglin Field, with its baseball diamond and Softball and soccer fields, 
lies along the banks of Buffalo Creek. This attractive field is important 
in the activities of intercollegiate and intramural sports. The field was 
named for Senator Tom Anglin of Oklahoma, an early graduate of 
Milligan. 

Baker Faculty Office Center was renovated in 2000-2001 and houses 
most of the faculty on campus. It is named for Albert and Rhea Baker, 
friends of Milligan College and strong supporters of Christian 
education. Adjacent to it, the Paul Clark Education Center houses 
Milligan's undergraduate and graduate programs in teacher education. It 
is named for Dr. Paul Clark, a longtime professor of teacher education 
at the college. 

David Quillen Athletic Building was completed in 1993 and serves 
the baseball, Softball, and soccer programs at Anglin Field. 

Derthick Hall, built in 1919 and formerly known as the Administration 
Building, occupies the site on which the original brick building of the 
college was erected in 1867. After a partial renovation in 1978, the 
building was named in honor of Dr. and Mrs. H.J. Derthick, president 
- il the college from 1917-1940. As part of the Centra] Campus Project 
initiated in May 2001, Derthick Hall underwent a comprehensive 
renovation. 

Elizabeth Leitner Gregory Center for the Liberal Arts houses a 290- 
seat theatre auditorium and the necessary backstage support, staging, 
and workshop for theatre classes, as well as darkrooms for photography 
students. The auditorium will also be used for the College's celebrated 
theatre arts program, humanities program, academic lecture series, and 
various campus community events. The facility should be completed 
late fall 2007. 

Hardin Hall was built in 1913, honoring Mr. and Mrs. George W. 
Hardin, and was the first women's residence hall on campus. Since an 
extensive renovation in 1992, the building has housed both the nursing 
and the occupational therapy programs, including faculty offices, 
laboratories, reading and conference rooms, the health clinic, and 
general classrooms. The Arnold Nursing Science Center occupies the 
top three floors, including the Beatrice J. "Jerry" Wilson Lecture Hall, 
named in honor of the wife of Edgar C. Wilson. The lower level houses 
the Price Complex, named in honor of Dr. Eugene P. Price, with offices 
for the master of business administration degree program as well as 
those of the business faculty; and the McGlothlin-Street Center for 
Occupational Therapy, which houses the College's master's degree 
program in occupational therapy. 

Hart Hall, an air-conditioned residence hall for 188 women, was 
completed in September 1965. In May of 1968 it was named in honor 
of Dr. and Mrs. John M. Hart. 

Hyder House is the former home of Professor and Mrs. Sam Jack 
I Ivder. It now houses the Office of Institutional Advancement. 

Kegley Hall built in 1992, honors the latej. Henry Kegley, a local 
businessman and Milligan College graduate. It has six suites consisting 
of four single rooms, a living room area, and bathroom. 



Litde Hartland Welcome Center, a gift of Mr. and Mrs. John M. 
Hart, was completed in 1976 and houses the Office of the President and 
the Office of Enrollment Management. 

Lowell W. Paxson Communications Center contains classrooms, 
editing rooms, a darkroom, and well-equipped studios for both radio 
and TV productions. The center was made possible through a gift from 
Lowell W. Paxson. The building was originally the college's Student 
Union Building but was remodeled in the late 1 980s to serve the 
communications program. 

McCown Cottage was built in 1913 as a home for the college president 
and his family. The home was originally designed by and named for 
Mary Hardin McCown, home economics teacher and daughter of 
George W. Hardin, the college's treasurer. For the past 30 years, the 
building has housed the college's business and finance offices and was 
renovated and expanded in 2005. 

McMahan Student Center, built in 1987, was a gift of Grace Hart 
McMahan in memory of her husband, John E. McMahan. It provides a 
focal point of campus fellowship and includes a snack bar, recreation 
room, lounge, study carrels, TV room, bookstore, career resource 
center, Student Government Association conference room, office of 
disability services, and office for campus activities. On the upper level 
of the Student Center is the Student Development Office; on the lower 
level is the office of information technology. 

P.H. Welshimer Memorial Library is a three-story building that was 
first occupied in November 1961 and is the gift of the T.W. Phillips, Jr. 
Charitable Trust and the Phillips family of Butler, Pennsylvania, after an 
initial gift by the Kresge Foundation of Detroit, Michigan. This building 
also contains the college archives and the law library. 

The Physical Plant Center was completed in late 2005. It houses 
maintenance, housekeeping, and grounds and is located near the Lacy 
Fieldhouse. 

Quillen Hall, built in 1992, recognizes the late Congressman James H. 
Quillen. It has six suites consisting of four single rooms, a living room 
area, and bathroom. 

Seeger Memorial Chapel was dedicated November 4, 1 967. The 
Chapel is a multi-purpose structure serving the college in worship, 
instruction, lectures, concerts, and drama. The main sanctuary- 
auditorium seats 1 ,300. The George O. Walker Auditorium, located on 
the lower level of the Chapel, accommodates 350 and is named in 
honor of George O. Walker, a long-time trustee and friend of the 
College. The Chapel was made possible through major gifts by Mr. Ura 
Seeger, West Lebanon, Indiana, and Mr. and Mrs. B.D. Phillips, Butler, 
Pennsylvania. The Wilson G. Barker Commons surround Seeger 
Chapel. 

The Science Building was first occupied in 1972. The building has 
five 24-station laboratories, two classrooms, a 250-seat lecture hall, and 
several special-purpose rooms. The Charles Gee Gross Anatomy Lab, 
associated with the occupational therapy program, is named in honor of 
Dr. Gee by alumni and friends of the college. The Sisk General 
Chemistry Lab is dedicated in memory of Professor Lone L. Sisk, a 
beloved longtime faculty member. 

Steve Lacy Fieldhouse was funded by gifts from the B.D. Phillips 
Memorial Trust and the Kresge Foundation and named in honor of 
1931 alumnus Dr. Steve Lacy, a longtime board member of the college. 
Lacy contains a regulation basketball court, a 25-meter swimming pool, 
classrooms, and other facilities designed to accommodate Milligan's 
philosophy of lifetime sports. Operation of this facility began in 1976. 



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student life and services 9 



The Student Apartments, which house upperclassmen and married 
couples in apartment suites, consist of four apartment buildings: 
Mildred Welshimer Phillips Hall, Helen Welshimer Hall, James Deforest 
Murch Hall, and Rolland Ehrman Hall. 

Sutton Memorial Hall stands on the high campus toward the east. The 
residence floors have thirty suites for women. The hall contains the 
Mabel Stephens Annex, the Joe and Lora McCormick Dining Center 
which seats about 400, the kitchen, and storage rooms. The hall bears 
the name of Webb and Nanye Bishop Sutton, whose vision and 
generosity made the construction possible. It was dedicated in 1956. 

Taylor/Phillips House is the former home of Governor Alfred M. 
Taylor and Wilson G. Barker, founder of the Buffalo Male and Female 
Institute. Renovated in 2001-02, the home now serves as a hospitality 
and reception house and is overseen by the Associated Ladies for 
Milligan. 

Webb Memorial Hall, a gift of Mrs. Nanye Bishop Sutton in memory 
of Webb O. Sutton, was completed and occupied in January 1960. It 
provides accommodations for 172 men. 

Williams Hall, built in 1992, is named in honor of Milligan College 
alumnus and federal judge, Glen M. Williams. It has six suites consisting 
of four single rooms, a living room area, and bathroom. 

The W. T. Mathes Tennis Center with six lighted courts was 
dedicated in fall 2005 and named for 1942 alumnus Dr. W. T. Mathes. 



Student Life 
and Services 



For more complete information about student services available at 
Milligan College as well as the guidelines in disciplinary matters, see the 
Student Handbook available in the Office of the Vice President for 
Student Development. 

Residence Life 

Since many campus activities are centered within the residence halls, the 
College encourages all students to take advantage of this valuable 
experience; therefore, Milligan College is primarily a residential college. 
The goal of the residence life staff at Milligan is to provide the physical 
environment and professional services to help students have an 
effective educational living/learning experience which will contribute to 
every aspect of student life — spiritual, social, academic, and physical. 
Interaction and cooperation are essential to personal growth in the 
residence hall. To this end, students and staff work together to 
communicate clearly, to encourage one another, and to uphold fairly the 
standards of communal living. 

The Residence Life Staff is made up of the resident directors, resident 
assistants, and Director of Residence Life and Housing. The residence 
hall director is assisted by resident assistants who report to the Director 
of Residence Life and Housing. In addition, within the comprehensive 
residence life program there is intentional programming implementing 
by the hall councils and Residence Hall Association (RHA). The hall 
councils seek to support the mission of the Residence Hall Association 
in representing the voice of the residents in their respective halls. The 
Residence Hall Association represents the entire residential community 
in order to stimulate an environment for growth and development 
through programming and appropriate services provided. 

Residence hall rooms are equipped with all necessary furniture. Students 
are required to leave all school-provided furniture in their assigned 
rooms. Students supply blankets, pillows, bedspreads, curtains, rugs, 
study lamps, and accessories. 

Telephone, cable and Internet service is available in all residence hall 
rooms. Each residence hall room has a network connection for each 
bed to provide access from the students' own computers to the campus 
network. Students must provide their own telephones and calling cards 
for long distance calls. 

All students living off-campus must receive prior approval from the 
Student Development Office. Maintenance or use of any separate 
quarters without prior approval from the Student Development Office 
subjects the student to suspension/dismissal. 

Married Student Housing 

Milligan College has apartments available for married students. These 
units are totally electric, including heating and air conditioning. All of 
the apartments are unfurnished. Additional information may be 
obtained by contacting the Student Development Office. 

Campus Activities and Organizations 

The College seeks to enhance students' educational experience through 
challenge and support in mentor relationships, active-learning 
opportunities, and purposeful programming. 

All social activities must first be approved by the Student Development 
Office and then entered on the College Master Calendar. 



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10 student life and services 



Fine Arts 

The fine arts program at Milligan College enriches campus life through 
the exhibition of painting, sculpture, and photography. Numerous 
exhibitions of guest artists as well as student exhibitions displaying 
recent art and photography work take place each year in the Milligan 
College Art Gallery on campus. Milligan College drama, which 
involves a large portion of the student body, has frequendy received 
critical acclaim. The Festival of One Act Plays and Short Films and 
performances in the SUB 7 coffee house serve as other campus venues 
for displays and performances of the fine arts. 

Music 

There are two choral ensembles at Milligan College. The Concert 
Choir, a choir of both men and women, tours annually throughout the 
United States, appearing at churches, high schools, and conventions. 
Milligan Women's Chorale is a women's chorus singing various styles 
of music, with concerts both on and off campus. 

Eight instrumental ensembles are available at Milligan College. Students 
have the opportunity to perform in Brass Choir, Orchestra, Civic 
Band (performing with the Johnson City Community Concert Band), 
Jazz Ensemble, Johnson City Symphony Orchestra, String 
Quartet, Jazz Combo, and Pep Band. Most instrumental ensembles 
perform both on and off campus. 

Heritage, a small a cappella ensemble, is an auditioned group of four to 
eight men and women performing on and off campus for churches and 
service clubs. Participation in Heritage earns college credit and 
scholarship assistance for its members. 

Publications and Media 

Students interested in journalism or creative writing may find an 
opportunity for self-expression through the medium of several 
publications of the College: the College newspaper, The Stampede, the 
College yearbook, The Buffalo, which presents a pictorial history of 
the year's activities; and the College literary magazine, Phoenix, which 
accepts original work from students and faculty. Students interested in 
broadcasting may join the staff of WUMC 90.5 FM (campus radio 
station). 

All Milligan College printed communication with an external audience 
(off-campus) must be submitted to the Public Relations Office for 
approval. 

All printed communication (e.g. brochures, flyers) and all uses of the 
Milligan College logo must follow the guidelines in the Publication 
Policy, Identity Standards and Style Guide document available from 
the Public Relations Office. These guidelines also apply for all events 
held on Milligan's campus, even if not officially sponsored by the 
College. It is the responsibility of the Milligan College contact to make 
the parties aware of these policies. 

Representative Organizations 

( Iperating under a constitution approved by the administration of the 
College, the Student Government Association serves as the official 
representative voice of Milligan College students and promotes 
academic, social, and religious activities for the campus community. 

The Student Government Association (SGA) consists of the following 
elected members: president, vice president, secretary, treasurer, the 
president of each class, four other representatives from each class (two 
females and two males). In addition to the elected positions, SGA seeks 
representation for commuters, married students, residence halls, and 
international students. The composition of these other representatives 
changes annually depending on the needs of the student body. 



Student Organizations: 
Professional, Social, and Recreational 

All professional and social organizations of Milligan College are 
designed to aid the students in fulfilling themselves and reaching their 
full potential religiously, academically, socially, and creatively. The 
following organizations were originated by students and have received 
the sanction of the College. Additional professional or social 
organizations may be added to this list upon the initiative of several 
students who present a charter to the College, select a faculty adviser, 
and demonstrate that the proposed organization is in keeping with the 
purposes and philosophy of Milligan College. 

Academic Affairs is a subcommittee of SGA which receives and 
discusses student academic concerns and opinions and communicates 
them to the faculty. They strive continually to improve Milligan 
College's academic standing and reputation. 

Alpha Chi is a collegiate national honor society. The association is 
open to juniors and seniors in the top 10% of their class with a grade 
point average of at least 3.5. 

Alpha Psi Omega, the national theatre honorary society, is active on 
campus with membership based on a point system whereby points are 
earned by participating in the many facets of theatre work on campus. 
Popular current projects include sponsoring the yearly Festival of One 
Act Plays and a touring production that travels to area public schools. 

Arts Council functions as a way to promote and recognize the arts on 
campus as well as making students aware of art opportunities on and off 
campus. The council strives to involve more students in artistic 
activities and sponsors a 'paint night' each semester. 

The Broadcast Club is made up of students who seek creative ways to 
utilize the communications media on campus (including Milligan's radio 
station and cable television channel). 

Buffalo Ramblers is an informal association of those members of the 
Milligan College family who enjoy exploring on foot the scenic gorges, 
peaks, caves, and waterfalls surrounding the College. 

Buffalo Yearbook is responsible for coordinating and publishing the 
annual yearbook received by all students, faculty, and staff. 

Campus Activities Board (CAB) assists in the planning of various 
extracurricular activities, including dances, trips, Wonderful Wednesday, 
film showings, and musical events. 

Christians in Business Club offers business majors the chance to 

discuss how their Christian faith relates to business issues. Members 
explore business from a Christian perspective in hopes to better 
understand their faith and how that faith influences their perceptions 
and actions in business. 

Christian Pre-law Association provides a means for students 
interested in law school or various careers within the legal field to gain 
an understanding of what will be expected of them after college. In 
addition, the club explores possible methods of integrating a Christian 
perspective in the legal field. 

College Republicans is an organization made up of students interested 
in local, state, and national politics. 

Commuter Council seeks to unite and involve commuters in campus 
life. 

Fanatics boost school spirit in the areas of athletics and residence life 
and promotes student and community involvement to achieve unity. 



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student life and services 11 



The French Club exists to promote social and educational activities in 
a French language setting. This club is open to all elementary and 
intermediate French students. 

The Campus Girl Scouts Club seeks to provide service through 
volunteering in the local community. Of course, they are also 
responsible for selling the infamous Girl Scout cookies. 

Habitat for Humanity introduces students to the organization and 
allows them to serve the community as they build a better future. 

The Hill seeks to foster fellowship among non-traditional students and 
to help address and solve any issues or problems they may face when 
adjusting to a residential college setting. 

Milligan College Cycling Club exists to promote fun and fellowship 
through bike riding and other outdoor activities. 

Milligan Recycling Committee continually seeks to make recycling a 
permanent and practiced activity on campus. Students strive to 
influence the college's attitudes toward the environment and Christian 
responsibility. 

Mu Kappa promotes fellowship among children of missionaries as well 
as international students by providing a loving and supportive 
environment for those whose families may not be in the U.S. 

Multi-Cultural Affairs Committee aims to make Milligan a genuinely 
multicultural Christian community by affirming the worth of all human 
beings and affirming the value and significance of the human cultures 
and communities that have developed over the centuries. 

Music Educators National Conference has a student chapter on the 
campus. Its purpose is to afford students the opportunity for 
professional musical orientation and development. These students also 
sponsor receptions after some concerts and serve as ushers for these 
events. 

NAMI, the Nation's Voice on Mental Illness, has a chapter on 
campus. NAMI exists to educate and increase awareness of mental 
health issues and to promote early detection, intervention, and 
resources. These students also strive to combat stigma that surrounds 
mental illness by breaking silence, shame, secrecy, myths, and ignorance 
that create barriers when seeking help. 

Omicron Psiis a national honor society for non-traditional students. 
The association is open to juniors and seniors at least 24 years of age, 
with a grade point average of at least 3.0. 

Phi Alpha Theta is an honorary history society with more than 
270,000 members in over 850 chapters in colleges and universities 
across the United States. Phi Alpha Theta's mission is to promote the 
study of history through the encouragement of research, good teaching, 
publication, and exchange of learning and ideas among historians. 
Milligan history students established the Alpha lota Tail chapter of Phi 
Alpha Theta during the Spring 2001 semester. 

Photography Club increases awareness of the Milligan College 
photography program and incorporates the community through 
Christian service in the arts. 

Psi Chi is the national Honor Society in Psychology for die purpose of 
encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship and 
advancing the science of psychology. 

Rotaract Club provides an opportunity for students to grow in their 
leadership skills and to promote better relations among all people 
worldwide through a framework of friendship and service. 



The Spanish Club exists to encourage Spanish culture and language 
appreciation while hosting several social and educational activities. 

The Student Nurses Association is an organization that exists to 
provide fellowship and student support for those in the nursing major. 
This organization also provides service and health promotion activities 
to the Milligan community. 

The Student Tennessee Education Association seeks to develop 
interest in education as a lifelong career, to develop among students 
preparing to be teachers an understanding of the teaching profession 
through professional associations, to give students preparing to teach 
practical experience in working with professional associations on the 
problems of the teaching profession and society, and to provide 
students preparing to teach with the history, organization, policies, 
ethics, and programs of the professional associations. 

SUB 7, a part of the Campus Activities Board (CAB), sponsors two 
coffeehouse style performances each month. Those participating with 
SUB 7 book the acts, set up the sound equipment, and make the coffee 
for each performance. All students are invited to attend. 

Wrapped in Love is a club that utilizes the crafts of knitting, 
crocheting, and sewing to provide articles to be given to local hospitals, 
children's homes, pregnancy care centers, homeless shelters, etc. The 
club also aims to teach others how to knit, crochet, and sew. 



Campus Ministry 



To support the college's mission, campus ministry provides programs 
for Christian spirituality, mission, worship, fellowship, and instruction. 

Through discipleship and formation, campus ministry seeks to nurture 
the vision of God's Kingdom, to develop intentional faith in living by 
the Holy Spirit, and to equip God's people with the means to fulfill 
their vocation as members of Christ's Church. 



Spiritual Formation Program 

Milligan College has a co-curricular program for spiritual formation. In 
addition to academic endeavors, all traditional students must participate 
in 150 spiritual formation programs to graduate. A calendar of chapel 
services, convocations, lectures, campus ministry programs, and 
community events qualifying for this program will be provided each 
semester. 



Chapel 

As part of the Spiritual Formation program, Milligan College has, from 
its beginning, held the chapel program as an integral part of campus life. 
The primary purpose of chapel is to provide the campus community an 
opportunity for corporate worship. The chapel service is respectful and 
inclusive of the entire College community and employs the variety of 
talent, worship styles, creativity, and sentiments of the College 
community in worshiping together. All Milligan College chapel services 
qualify for the spiritual formation program and occur on Thursday 
mornings in Seeger Chapel at 1 1 :00 until 1 1:50 AM. Generally these 
services are exclusively worship venues. Occasionally, lectures, 
dialogues, or other forums may occur during the designated chapel time. 

Convocation 

Also a part of the Spiritual Formation program, programs not following 
a worship format but characterized by the integration of faith and 
learning are designated as convocation programs. These events will 
include cultural and artistic presentations, forums addressing faidi and 
contemporary issues, and special lecture presentations. Milligan College 
convocation programs traditionallv occur on Tuesday mornings at 1 1 :00 
until 1 1 :50 AM but can occasionally occur at other times and locations. 



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12 student life and services 



Campus Ministry Team: CMT 

In conjunction with the campus ministry staff, this is the organizational 
fellowship including all the various extensions of campus ministry at 
Milligan College. Members of this group are made up of the student 
leaders for Chapel, Vespers, Service Seekers, LINC, Habitat for 
Humanity, Beacon, FCA, Cross Cultural Missions Committee, Resident 
Chaplains, Campus Ministry Chair, Campus Ministry Committee, and 
work study students. 

(FCA) Fellowship of Christian Athletes: Open to all students, this 
ministry addresses the mutually benefiting opportunities for religion and 
sports and serves the unique dynamics of student athletes. FCA hosts 
monthly events qualifying for the spiritual formation program, weekly 
small groups and bible studies, retreats, and Christian leadership 
seminars. 

Vespers: An informal, contemporary student-led worship service open 
to all students. Vesper services occur at 9:00 PM on Sunday evenings in 
lower Seeger Chapel's Walker Auditorium. 

(CCMC) Cross Cultural Missions Committee: This ministry 
promotes cross cultural mission awareness and engagement through 
mission trips, monthly forums, national conferences, and other events. 

Service Seekers: This ministry encourages Milligan students to reach 
out to people in assisted living communities by visiting residents and 
leading weekly chapel services for them. 

Resident Chaplains: These students provide spirituality and vocational 
discernment programs in residence halls. 

(LINC) Linking Individuals to the Needs of the Community: This 
organization serves as a hub for coordinating individual students with 
local community service organizations but also providing the college 
opportunities to partner with national service initiatives. 

Beacon: This ministry encourages Milligan students to reach out and 
serve the needs of rural Appalachia through mission trips. 

Habitat for Humanity: This ministry is an official chapter of the 
nationwide Habitat for Humanity organization and enables Milligan 
students to participate in constructing homes for those in need. 

(CMC) Campus Ministry Committee: This committee coordinates 
discipleship and spiritual formation activities beyond those of the CMT, 
Campus Ministry Team. These activities include spiritual retreats, 
prayer vigils, Christian leadership conferences and seminars, devotional 
breakfasts, additional discipleship groups, campus ministry publicity, 
and fellowship events. 

Bible Bowl: This ministry made up of former bible bowlers 
coordinates The Milligan College Summer Bible Bowl tournament. 



Athletics 

Milligan College encourages participation in intercollegiate athletics. A 
limited number of grants-in-aid will be awarded each year on a merit 
basis. 

The Milligan College athletics program has enjoyed a proud heritage 
and long tradition of success with student-athletes participating in 
intercollegiate athletics. The Milligan College Buffaloes compete in the 
Appalachian Athletic Conference (AAC) and the National Association 
of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and sponsor teams in baseball, 
basketball, cheerleading, cross country, golf, soccer, Softball, swimming, 
tennis, track and field, and volleyball. Milligan athletic programs 
compete at a high level as evidenced by having won many conference 
titles and by having appeared in many national championship 



competitions in the recent past. Athletic scholarship awards are 
available. 

The intramural program of athletics is designed to encourage 
participation by all students in some sport. A choice of activities is 
offered including basketball, flag-football, volleyball, and Softball. In 
addition, there are several individual recreational opportunities offered 
such as hiking, skiing, and scuba diving. 



Health Services 

Milligan College takes every reasonable precaution to prevent accidents 
and illness. The services of a nurse are provided in a clinic on the 
campus to care for minor ailments and any emergency. Students are 
expected to report at once to the college nurse any accident or illness. 
When necessary, referral is made to local physicians. 

All students are required to maintain health insurance coverage on 
themselves at their own expense. In most cases this can be done 
through their family or job. However, the college does provide 
information on health insurance coverage that can be purchased 
individually. This information can be obtained through the Student 
Development office or from the campus nurse. 

The College cannot assume financial liability for off-campus physician 
and hospital services. Most families are protected today for medical and 
hospital claims through special insurance programs. Premium payment 
is the responsibility of the individual student. All students participating 
in intercollegiate athletics are required to show coverage in an accident 
and hospitalization program. 

Mental and social health is also a concern of the College. Counselors are 
available for some counseling in these areas. In addition the services of 
area mental health facilities can be utilized. However, the College is not 
equipped to provide long-term, in-depth psychotherapy or psychiatric 



Federal Laws and Acts 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, is 
a federal law which states (a) that a written institutional policv must be 
established and (b) that a statement of adopted procedures governing 
the privacy rights of students be made available. The laws provide that 
the institution will maintain the confidentiality of student education 
records. 

Milligan College accords all the rights under the law to students who are 
declared independent. No one outside the institution shall have access 
to nor will the institution disclose any information from students' 
education records without the written consent of students except to 
personnel within the institution, to officials of other institutions in 
which students seek to enroll, to persons or organizations providing 
students financial aid, to accrediting agencies carrying out their 
accreditation function, to persons in compliance with a judicial order, 
and to persons in an emergency in order to protect the health or safety 
of students or others. 

Within the Milligan College community only those members, 
individually or collectively, acting in the students' educational interest 
are allowed access to student education records. 

At its discretion, the institution may provide director)' information in 
accordance with the provisions of the Act to include: student name, 
address, telephone number, e-mail address, date and place of birth, 
major field of study, dates of attendance, degrees, honors, and awards 
received, the most recent previous educational agency or institution 
attended by the student, participation in officially recognized activities 



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student life and services 13 



and sports, grade level, enrollment status, and weight and height of 
members of athletic teams. Students may withhold directory 
information by notifying the Registrar's Office in writing within two 
weeks after the first day of class for the fall and spring terms. The 
institution honors requests for non-disclosure for only one semester; 
therefore, authorization to withhold directory information must be filed 
each semester in the Office of the Registrar. 

Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act 

Information relative to the Student Right to Know and Campus 
Security Act (Public Law 101-542) is available in the Office of the Vice 
President for Student Development. This information includes campus 
crime statistics and graduation rates by athletic participation, gender, 
and ethnicity. 

In accordance with the Tennessee College and University Security 
Information Act of 1989, Milligan College has prepared a report 
containing campus security policies and procedures, data on campus 
crimes, and other related information. A free copy of this report may be 
obtained by any student, employee, or applicant for admission or 
employment from the Office of Student Development, Milligan 
College, Milligan College, Tennessee 37682. 



Student Guidelines 

Conduct 

Milligan College is intent upon integrating Christian faith with 
scholarship and life. Because of this Christian commitment, Milligan 
College values the integrity of each individual. However, the action of 
each person affects the whole community. While attending Milligan 
College, each student is considered a representative of the College 
whether on or off the campus. The College, therefore, reserves the right 
to refuse, suspend, or dismiss any student. Public disclosure of reasons 
shall be at the discretion of the President. 

Lifestyle 

Milligan College adopts specific rules on the basis of the belief that 
God's Word, as the final rule of faith and practice, speaks on many 
matters pertaining to personal conduct. Therefore, behavior that 
conflicts with Scripture is unacceptable. Historically, communities have 
also developed guidelines that help put into practice basic moral and 
social principles. Such standards serve as a guide toward worthwhile 
goals relevant to one's academic, spiritual, social, and physical well- 
being. Specifically, the student agrees to abide by a lifestyle commitment 
in which he or she refrains from the use or possession of alcoholic 
beverages or illegal drugs. The student also agrees to refrain from 
pornography, profanity, dishonesty, sexual immorality, unethical 
conduct, vandalism, and immodest dress. Students are expected to 
observe the Lord's Day in worship and to seek to serve Christ in an 
atmosphere of trust, encouragement, and respect for one another. 



Student Complaint Policy 

After all appropriate appeals processes have been exhausted at the 
departmental level, students may lodge formal complaints, in writing, as 
follows: 

Student Affairs Issues (e.g., housing, food service, student 
activities, athletics, intramurals, spiritual life, parking): Complaints 
should be directed to the vice president for student development. 

Academic Affairs Issues (e.g., faculty, courses, schedules, 
transcripts, information technology, registration): Complaints 
should be directed to the vice president for academic affairs. 

Business Affairs Issues (e.g., financial aid, workstudy, student 
accounts, bookstore, physical facilities and grounds): Complaints 
should be directed to the vice president for business or the vice 
president for finance. 

The vice president (student development, academic affairs, business, or 
finance) will respond to complaints within a reasonable time. Should the 
response be unsatisfactory, or should a complaint arise for an area not 
listed above, a formal written complaint may be submitted to the Office 
of the President. 

Automobile 

The privilege of using an automobile is granted to all students. The 
College will not be responsible for any personal or public liability 
growing out of the student's use or possession of the car on or off 
campus. Each student vehicle driven on campus must be registered with 
the Student Development Office and have a parking sticker displayed in 
the rear window or it is subject to removal from campus at the owner's 
expense. Students who repeatedly violate the vehicular regulations may 
lose the privilege of having a vehicle on campus. 

Rules governing student use of motor vehicles are determined and 
administered by the Student Development Office and the traffic court. 

Community 

The visitor to the Milligan College campus invariably notices the 
friendliness and spirit which characterize the entire Milligan College 
circle, faculty and students alike. Each student has an adviser. This 
experienced faculty member is concerned that the student not only 
excels academically but also benefits from the opportunities afforded by 
a small college environment. 

Provision for a well-rounded social life receives special attention. 
Student committees plan recreational and social activities. Initiative in 
student participation is encouraged. 

The cultivation of high ideals and good habits, together with their 
expression in social poise and consideration for others, is a major 
concern. Individual counsel and other friendly help are always available 
to each student. We speak of "membership" in Milligan College rather 
than "attending" Milligan. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



14 admission 



Admission 



For information about admission to the programs of study in Bachelor of Science in 
Business Administration and Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education 
(Adult Degree Completion Program), the Master of Education (M.Ed.), the Master 
of Science in Occupational Therapy (M.S.O.T.), and the Master of Business 
Administration (M.BA..), refer to the academic program section for each of these 
programs. 



Undergraduate Admission 

Freshman Class 

Character, ability, preparation, and seriousness of purpose are qualities 
emphasized in considering applicants for membership in Milligan 
College. Early application is encouraged. Those who are interested in 
attending Milligan College are encouraged to visit the campus. 
Arrangements should be made in advance with the Office of 
Enrollment Management. 

Overall excellence of performance in high school subjects as well as 
evidence of Christian commitment and academic potential provides the 
basis for admission to Milligan College. While no specific course pattern 
is required for admission, the applicant is strongly encouraged to 
include in the high school program the following subjects: 

1 . College preparatory English 

2. College preparatory mathematics 

3. College preparatory science 

4. College preparatory history and/or social science 

5. Two years of a single foreign language 

6. Some work in speech, music, or art in preparation for study in a 
liberal arts curriculum. 

To provide further evidence of academic ability, the applicant must take 
the American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT- 
I) and furnish the College with either of these scores. Freshmen 
applicants who are 21 years of age or older at the time of application are 
not required to submit ACT or SAT-I results. 

The admissions procedure includes the following steps: 

1. The student will obtain an application form, forms for requesting 
transcripts and references, a catalog, and other literature from the 
Office of Enrollment Management or from the Milligan College 
web site at www.milligan.edu. 

2. The student will return the completed application with a non- 
refundable application fee of $30.00 to the Office of Enrollment 
Management. The application mav also be filed online at 
www.milligan.edu. 

3. The Admissions Committee will review the application when the 
following credentials are on file: high school transcript, college 
transcripts (if applicable), ACT or SAT-I scores, and two 
references. The Admissions Committee may also request an 
interview. 

4. The Office of Enrollment Management will notify the applicant of 
the decision regarding admission and any relevant conditions. 
Admission is subject to the successful completion of high school 
(or completion of current college term). The student must provide 
final high school transcript showing proof of graduation (or final 
college transcript, if a transfer student). 

5. Upon admission to the College, the student must submit an 
enrollment deposit. The enrollment deposit is non-refundable after 
May 1. Upon enrollment, the deposit will be applied to the 



student's account. 

Home school 

Home school students should follow the admissions procedure outlined 
above. If the student is under the supervision of a home school agency, 
etc., a transcript should be sent by the agency, etc. direcdy to the Office 
of Enrollment Management. If the student is not under the supervision 
of a home school agency, etc., he/she must submit a portfolio of high 
school course work. Please contact the Office of Enrollment 
Management for more information. 

International Students 

Milligan College is approved by the United States Department of Justice 
for education of non-immigrant alien students. International students 
must present a TOEFL or ILETS score. The TOEFL score must be at 
least 550 on the paper-based examination or 213 on the computer- 
based examination or 79 on the internet-based examination. The ILETS 
score must be at least 5.5. 

Students who reside in the following countries should not submit a 
TOEFL or ILETS score: United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, 
Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Rather, they should submit ACT 
and/or SAT-I scores. 

Students who reside in Japan may elect to take the EIKEN Test in 
Practical English Proficiency, administered by STEP (Society for 
Testing English Proficiency). The EIKEN score must be at the Grade 
Pre-1 or Grade 1 level to demonstrate English proficiency at an 
acceptable level. 

International students also must provide an affidavit of support and 
prepay all expenses for one semester. $500 of the prepayment is non- 
refundable. All admission materials must be received by June 1 for fall 
enrollment. 

International students must complete a writing sample during new 
student orientation unless excused by the writing faculty. The writing 
sample determines the need for placement in HUMN 093 Fundamental 
College Writing. International students with no ACT or SAT-I scores 
and no college-level (non-developmental) math course with a grade of 
C- or above also must take a math competency examination to 
determine the need for MATH 090 Developmental Mathematics. 
Placement in HUMN 091 College Reading and Study Skills is 
determined on a case-by-case basis. 

Non-degree Seeking Students 

Students who are not seeking a degree at Milligan College may be in one 
of the following categories: 

1 . Special students are those who are not admitted as degree-seeking 
students but who demonstrate the potential to successfully 
complete some college-level courses. The academic dean must 
grant special student status at the beginning of each semester. 
Special students are not eligible for institutional scholarships or 
state or federal financial aid. They may not participate in 
intercollegiate athletics. At the end of each semester, special 
students may apply for admission as degree-seeking students. 

2. Transient students are those who are seeking a degree at another 
institution or are not enrolled at any institution but wish to enroll 
in selected courses at Milligan College. Transient students must 
submit to the Office of Enrollment Management a completed 
special student application and an official transcript from the last 
institution attended. After the evaluation of these documents, the 
applicant may be admitted as a transient student. Transient 
students are not eligible for institutional scholarships or state or 
federal financial aid. They may not participate in intercollegiate 
athletics. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



admission 15 



Returning Students 

A student who has withdrawn from Milligan College in good social and 
academic standing should complete an application for readmission and 
submit it to the Office of Enrollment Management. An official 
transcript(s) of all college course work attempted since withdrawing 
from Milligan must also be submitted to the Office of Enrollment 
Management. The Admissions Committee will consult representatives 
from the Student Financial Services and Student Development offices 
in making a decision regarding the student's readmission and will send 
the student a letter stating the decision. 

A student who has been academically or socially dismissed may, after 
one semester, reapply for admission by observing the following 
procedure: 

1 . In addition to completing the application for readmission and 
submitting official transcripts, the student should submit a letter 
presenting justification for readmission. 

2. The registrar will evaluate the student's original records and any 
course work completed since the suspension. The director of 
enrollment management will consult representatives from the 
Student Financial Services Office and review social dismissal with 
the vice president for student development. 

3. If there is reason to believe that the student would profit from 
another opportunity to do college work, the College will allow the 
student to enroll with probationary status following at least one 
semester of suspension. 

4. If it is necessary to suspend the student a second time, that student 
will not be eligible to apply for readmission. 

Transfer Students 

Transfer students are those who have completed twenty-four or more 
college credit hours after high school graduation at the time of 
application to Milligan College. Students who wish to transfer from an 
accredited college, who merit a letter of good standing, and who have a 
grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale will be considered for 
admission to Milligan College. Such applicants should follow the 
procedure described above, except that ACT or SAT-I scores and high 
school transcripts are not required. In addition applicants must furnish 
the College with official transcripts of all previous college work. 

Transfer applicants with fewer than twenty-four college semester hours 
earned at the time of application, must also submit an official high 
school transcript and ACT or SAT-I scores (if under 21 years of age). 



Overall excellence of performance in previous college work and 
evidence of Christian commitment and academic potential provide the 
basis for admission of transfer students to Milligan College. 

The associate registrar evaluates transfer credits for all entering transfer 
students prior to the students' enrollment at Milligan College. Students 
who do not request a transfer evaluation prior to two weeks before the 
beginning of the term receive a copy of the evaluation during new 
student orientation. 

Transfer students must complete a writing sample to determine writing 
proficiency. If they have no ACT or SAT-I scores and no college-level 
(non-developmental) math course with a grade of C- or above, they also 
must take a math competency examination. The writing sample and the 
math examination are completed during new student orientation. 
Transfer students also must demonstrate computer competency prior to 
graduating from Milligan College. 

Audits 

Any student wishing to audit a course must have permission of the 
instructor. No credit will be allowed for audit courses, and a grade of 
"AU" will be assigned. Full-time Milligan College students wishing to 
audit classes may do so as part of their regular course load. Transient 
students who wish to audit courses must submit to the Office of 
Enrollment Management a completed special student application; 
registration follows approval of the application. 

Ceremony of Matriculation 

After all admission requirements have been met, including orientation 
activities at the beginning of the year, the candidate for admission may 
participate in the ceremony of matriculation. At the conclusion of a 
general assembly, the candidates sign the matriculation book and 
officially become members of the Milligan Community. 

GED 

Students who have earned a General Education Development certificate 
(GED) should follow the procedure outlined above for a freshman 
applicant. Official results of the GED examination should be sent to 
the Office of Enrollment Management. An official high school 
transcript should also be submitted detailing course work that was 
completed prior to the earning of the GED. The Admissions 
Committee may request an interview with the applicant. GED students 
are required to submit ACT or SAT-I scores if they are under 21 years 
of age at the time of application. If twenty-four college semester hours 
have been earned at the time of application, ACT or SAT-I scores are 
not required, regardless of age (and official college transcripts should 
also be submitted). 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



16 financial information 



Financial Information 

Milligan College is a private nonprofit institution. Tuition, fees, and 
other charges paid by the student represent only a part of the income 
necessary to fund the instructional and operating expenses of the 
College. Other sources of income include earnings from endowment 
funds and contributions by alumni, churches, businesses, foundations, 
and friends of Milligan College. The Student Financial Services Office 
assists families in making the necessary financial arrangements to attend 
Milligan College. 

Tuition and other Basic Charges for 
Traditional Undergraduate Programs, 
2007-08 

Per Semester 

Tuition (12-18 hrs. per semester) S9,450. 

Board 1,420. 

Room (double room) 1,275. 

Student Activity Fee* 100. 

Technology Access Fee* 180. 

Health Fee* 25. 

Life-time transcript fee * 20. 

Total $12,470. 

*See "Explanation of Fees" section of the Catalog. 

Other Tuition Charges 

Traditional Day Students 

1 2- 1 8 hrs. (per semester) $9,450. 

1-5 hxs. (per hour) $320. 

6-11 hrs (per hour) $520. 

Over 1 8 hrs (per hour) $520. 

Summer School and Intercession (per hour) $320. 

Tuition for Nontraditional and Graduate 
Programs, 2007-08 

ADCP (Business Administration or Early Childhood Education major) 
(per hour) $275. 



M.B.A. Program (per hour) 

Returning Students (per hour) 
New Class (per hour) 

M.Ed. Program** (per hour) 



$375. 
$400. 



$320. 



**The Master of Education tuition rate becomes effective for fall of 
2007. 

M.S.O.T. Program 

Returning Students (per hour) $490. 

New Class (per hour) $520. 

Fees 

Per Semester 

Full-time Traditional Day Students 

Health Fee $25. 

Student Activity Fee $100. 

Technology Access Fee $180. 
Pan-time Traditional Day Students 

Technology Access Fee (less than 6 hrs.) $90. 

Student Activity Fee (less than 6 hrs) $50. 

Health Fee (charged to all traditional day students) $25. 

ADCP (Business Administration or Early Childhood Education major) 
Technology Access Fee $87. 



M.Ed. Program 

Technology Access Fee $180. 

Part-time Technology Access Fee (less than 6 hrs.) $90. 

M.S.O.T. Program 

Technology Access Fee $180. 

Part-time Technology Access Fee (less than 6 hrs.) $90. 

Room and Board Charges, 2007-08 

Double Room $1,275. 

Single Room (when available) $1,475. 

Board (meal plan) is required for residence hall occupants: $1,420. 

Snack Bar Plus $50. 

Special Classes and Lab Fees 

The following fees apply when a student is registered for the 
following courses: 



ART 400 

ART 441 

BIOL 200 

EDUC 150, 343, 406, 408, 443, 520, 565, 576, 577 

EDUC 152 

EDUC 355, 356 

EDUC 441 

EDUC 452, 453, 454, 455 

EDUC 456, 553 

EDUC 541 (Art portion of course only) 

EDUC 551, 552 

Science laboratory fee 

(excludes BIOL 450, 451, 460; CHEM 301, 310) 
Science laboratory fee for CHEM 302 
Language lab fee 
HPXS 101 
HPXS 105 
HPXS 158 and 159 
HPXS 160 
HPXS 302F 
HPXS 307 
HPXS 310A 
HPXS 31 0B 



$650. 

$5. 

S65./hr 

$10. 

15. 

$15. 

$20. 

$150. 

$50. 

$5. 

$100. 

$30. 
$60. 
$10. 
$15. 
$50. 
Fee for off-campus instruction 
$25. 
$55. 
$45. 
$20. 
S50. 



HUMN 200 (Humanities European Study Tour) SlOO./hr 

MUSC 101 (piano), 102, 124, 201, 211 $75. 

MUSC 1 43- 1 44, 243-244 $25. 

(a maximum fee of S1 50 for any combination of the music courses listed above) 
NURS 201C, 202L, 210C, 220C, 300, 301C, 



310C, 313, 320C, 323, 402, 410, 410C, 420 


$20. 


NURS 220 


$45. 


NURS 460 


$140. 


OT531 


$140. 


OT 535, 610, and 620 


$30. 


OT 643 and 644 


$15. 


Tuition charges in applied music 


SISO./'/ihr 


(Applied fees will be refunded if [he student drops the class within the first 6vi 


: days of classes. After 


this rime, fees will not be refunded.) 





Other Fees 

Application fee for admission(non-refundable) 

Audit fee 

Change of course fee 

Graduate diploma & graduation fee 

Undergraduate diploma & graduation fee 

Late registration fee 

CLEP fee (per instrument) 

Administrative fee (Milligan students) 
Administrative fee (non-Milligan students) 



$30. 
$30./hr 
$10. 
$90. 
$65. 
$35. 
$65. 
$12. 
$15. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



financial information 17 



DANTES fee (per instrument) 

Administrative fee (Milligan students) 
Administrative fee (non-Milligan students) 

Posting of credit by examination 

(Advanced Placement, CLEP, etc.) 

Lifetime Transcript Fee (new students) 

MAT (per instrument) 

Study-away fee 



$70. 
$12. 
$15. 

$10./hr 

$20. 

$70. 

$500. 



The College reserves the right, beginning any semester or session, to 
change the charges for tuition, fees, room, and board without written 
notice. 



Explanation of Fees 



Student Activity Fee 

The student activity fee is used to fund 100% of the Student 
Government Association (SGA) budget. Thus, the student body spends 
ever)' dollar of the fee. These funds are distributed to twenty different 
committees and organizations. These SGA committees provide a wide 
variety of activities and services to students throughout the year, 
including spiritual activities, concerts, social events, campus radio 
station, literary publications, and more. In addition, students receive 
copies of the student newspaper, The Stampede, and a copy of the 
Milligan College yearbook. 

Technology Access Fee 

The technology access fee is used to provide an extensive campus-wide 
computer network system consisting of fiber optic cabling, file servers, 
software, unlimited Internet availability, e-mail, and direct access from 
each residence hall room and several on-campus fully equipped student 
computer labs. The Library catalog is accessible through the network; 
and, through it, students can connect to other libraries and information 
databases. Computer lab software includes the Microsoft Office 
products Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint, Logos (Bible-study 
software), and various other programs for use with specific classes. This 
fee enables students to access the system for obvious added academic 
benefits. 

Computer labs are available to all students. Students who provide their 
own computers may access the computer network directly from their 
residence hall room. Suggested specific computer configurations are 
available from the information technology staff. The Milligan College 
Bookstore has computer systems, supplies, and network cards available 
for purchase. 

Lifetime Transcript Fee 

All new students will be charged a one-time fee for lifetime transcripts. 
Students can request a transcript from the Office of the Registrar. 

Health Fee 

All full-time and part-time traditional students will be charged a health 
fee, which supports health clinic services. 

Financial Registration Policy 

Students must make provision for the payment of applicable charges for 
tuition, fees, room, and board by the statement due date. A student's 
registration for classes is an obligation and commitment to pay for all 
related charges. Students must settle their account each semester to be 
permitted to register for the following semester. 

Advanced financial planning by the student is imperative. The College 
mails a statement of the student's account accompanied by a Statement 
Option Form before each semester to assist students in this matter. 
Students need to complete and return the Statement Option Form to 
Student Financial Services before the stated deadline. It is the student's 
responsibility to make payment arrangements with Student Financial 



Services. 

Meal Plan 

Milligan College offers an unlimited access continuous service meal plan 
Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. with late night service in 
the Grill. Complete meal programs are offered at traditional meal times, 
and, when the full program is not offered, beverages, cereals, deli, pizza, 
soup, salad, fruits, desserts, and breads are available. The dining hall 
becomes another community-oriented space where students can visit, 
study, or grab a bite with friends at their convenience. 

On weekends, meals are served at traditional meal time hours with a 
Saturday brunch. Serving hours may be adjusted from time to time to 
accommodate an occasional campus event; proper notice will be given 
to all students of any adjustments. 



Saturday: 

Brunch: 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 

Dinner: 5:00 - 6:00 p.m. 



Sunday: 

Continental breakfast:: 

8:00 -9:00 a.m. 
Lunch: 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m. 
Dinner 5:00- 6:00 p.m. 



Transfer Meal Option 

Students can use their meal plan at the grill. The transfer meal option 
allows a limited number of meals per semester to be taken at the grill 
rather than at the cafeteria. Menu selection is all-inclusive (grill entree, 
side item, dessert or fruit, and drink). This feature enhances the food 
service by offering more flexibility to the campus population at no extra 
charge and is automatically included in the meal plan. 

Snack Bar Plus Account (SBP) 

The Snack Bar Plus (SBP) account is an option that provides a $50 meal 
credit line at the SUB (McMahan Student Center Snack Bar) for an 
additional charge of $40 to your meal plan. This 20% bonus credit is 
only available to accounts purchased during registration. 

This added flexibility allows students to grab a quick snack or meal at 
their convenience with the ease of a prepaid credit card. Additionally, if 
students need to add to their credit lines, they may do so at any time 
after registration. SBP accounts can be purchased in increments of $25, 
entitling a student to a 10% bonus credit. Commuters not on a campus 
meal plan may also purchase an SBP account to be used for meal 
purchases in either the Student Union Building Snack Bar or cafeteria. 
Students may purchase an SBP account in the cafeteria and Student 
Union Building Snack Bar. SBP account balances are not transferable 
from one academic vear to another. 



Payment 



General Information 

Tuition, fees, and all other costs for the semester are due and payable 
on the statement due date. Tuition, fees, and all odier costs for summer 
school and intersession are due and payable on or before the first day of 
each term. Students enrolling in summer school and intersession must 
make specific payment arrangements with Student Financial Services 
before the first day of class. 

Students receiving financial aid must pay the difference between the 
total cost for the semester and the financial aid commitment (excluding 
work-study) on or before the statement due date. 

To enable financial aid to cover your student account, all financial 
processes must be completed by the end of the drop/add period. This 
includes completion of on-line entrance interviews for loans, on-line 
signature of MPN's (Master Promissory Notes), award letters signed 
and returned, and any documentation required for verification returned 
to the Student Financial Services Office. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



18 financial information 



A semester grade report, transcript, and/or diploma will not be issued 
to a student whose account is not settled by the end of a semester or 
term. In addition, a transcript will not be issued to individuals in default 
on their Federal Perkins Loans. 

If a period of 90 days passes without any activity on an account with an 
unpaid balance, the College may refer the account to a collection 
agency. The student will be responsible for any attorney fees and/or 
costs associated with the collection of the unpaid balance. A delinquent 
account is also reported to major credit bureaus. 

Monthly Tuition Payment Plan 

Milligan College is pleased to offer a special payment plan for students 
who desire to pay educational expenses in monthly installments. This is 
an interest-free payment plan available through Tuition Pay/Academic 
Management Services (AJVIS). No student, other than those participating 
in the Academic Management Services payment plan, will be permitted 
to attend classes before paying the balance of their account in full. 

The Academic Management Services plan permits families to spread 
their payments over a period of 7 to 10 months, with the last payment 
due near the end of the spring semester (before graduation). The 
current cost of the plan is S65 per year which includes life insurance 
coverage. All new students receive information about this plan with 
their billing statement prior to the beginning of each semester. 
Information is also available through the Milligan College Student 
Financial Services Office. 

ADCP and MBA students can enroll in an eighteen-month payment 
plan. The AMS application fee is $85. 

Additionally, students on the Tuition Pay/ AMS plan are fully expected 
to maintain monthly payments as agreed. A $40 late payment fee will be 
charged to accounts for delinquent payments. The College reserves the 
right to require immediate payment in full for any student who fails to 
maintain their Tuition Pay /AMS payment schedule. If payment is not 
made as required by the College, the student is subject to immediate 
dismissal. 

The Tuition Pay/AMS plan is designed for the convenience of students 
and their parents. The College encourages students to set up their own 
plans directly with Tuition Pay/AMS. The College reviews all Tuition 
Pay/AMS plans to ensure that the monthly Tuition Pay/AMS payments 
are for the proper amount. It should be understood that these plans do 
not lessen the financial obligation of students. Individuals who abuse 
the Tuition Pay/AMS payment plans will not be permitted to use them 
for future academic years. 

Tuition Reimbursement 

If you are receiving tuition reimbursement from your employer, we will 
be glad to work with you in developing a payment arrangement for the 
semester. You must present a letter from your employer stating the 
company's reimbursement policy and your eligibility for reimbursement. 
However, your student account must be paid in full prior to proceeding 
with the graduation process. 

Forms of Payment 

Students may pay their student account using cash, money orders, 
personal checks, certified checks, Visa, MasterCard, American Express, 
and Discover. The most convenient way to make a payment is to use 
our online payment feature on our website at www.milligan.edu/sfs. 



Refund Policy 



Refund in the Event of Withdrawal from the College 

The College operates on an annual budget that necessitates advance 
planning and financial commitments to teaching staff and others whose 
services are essential to its operations. For this reason, no refunds are 
granted to those persons who are dismissed from the College for 



disciplinary reasons. 

The official date of withdrawal used to compute refunds is the date on 
which the student begins the official withdrawal process in the Student 
Development office. 

Tuition and Room Refund Schedule for Fall and Spring Semesters 

Tuition and room refunds are calculated on the following schedule: 

Prior to first calendar day of the semester 100% 

During first five calendar days of the semester 90% 

During the 6th through the 14th calendar day of the semester 75% 

During the 15th through the 30th calendar day of the semester... 50% 

No refunds after the 30th calendar day of the semester 0% 

or for unofficial withdrawals 
An exception is made for illness, in which case the 50% refund period is 
extended to the ninth week. Illness must be certified by a physician's 
written statement. 

Refund Schedule for Summer and Intersession 

Prior to first day of the class 100% 

During first day of the class 90% 

During the second day of the class 75% 

During the third and fourth day of the class 50% 

No refunds after the fourth day of class 0% 

or for unofficial withdrawals 

Board Refund Schedule 

In all cases, a student is charged the pro rata share of board based on 
the number of calendar days enrolled. 

Other Fees Refund Schedule 

Unless a student withdraws during the first five calendar days of the 
semester, all other fees are not refundable. 

ADCP and M.B.A. Refund Schedule 

Students enrolled in these programs will be charged the pro rata share 
of tuition based on the number of days attended. 

Institutional Scholarship Proration Schedule 

Institutional scholarships are those scholarships granted by Milligan 
College. If a student withdraws during the first 30 calendar days of the 
semester, the institution scholarships will be calculated using the 
following schedule: 

Prior to first calendar day of the semester 0% 

During first five calendar days of the semester 10% 

During the 6th through the 14th calendar day of the semester 25% 

During the 15th through the 30fh calendar day of the semester... 50% 
After the 30th calendar day of the semester 100% 

Refund in the Event of Withdrawal from Class 

The schedule of refunds for withdrawal from a class is different from 
above. Because the College charges the same tuition for 12-18 hours, 
there is no refund for withdrawing from a class if the total hours, before 
and after withdrawal, are within the 12-18 credit hour range. Students 
withdrawing from a course or courses outside the 1 2- 1 8 hour range will 
be granted full tuition refunds to apply toward courses added. If the 
new total hours are fewer than the original total, the following schedule 
will apply: 

Prior to first calendar day of the semester 100% 

During first five calendar days of the semester 90% 

During the 6th through 14th calendar days of the semester 75% 

During the 15th through the 30th calendar day of the semester... 50% 
No refunds after the thirtieth calendar day of the semester 0% 

Return of Title IV Funds (Federal Financial Aid) 

In addition to the overall institutional refund policy requirements, the 
College is required to follow the regulations mandated by the 
Department of Education pursuant to the Higher Education 
Reconciliation Act of 2005 for any student who receives Title IV 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



financial information 19 



Federal Aid. The Return of Tide IV Fund calculations are required 
when a student withdraws, either officially or unofficially 

Steps in the Calculation for the Return of Tide IV Funds (Software 
and/or worksheets provided by the Department of Education will be 
used to complete these calculations.) 



Step 1 
Step 2 
Step 3: 
Step 4: 

Step 5: 

Step 6: 
Step 7: 



Collect information about student's Title IV Aid 

Calculate percentage of Tide IV Aid earned by the student 

Calculate amount of Title IV Aid earned by the student 

Determine if the student is due post-withdrawal disbursement 

or if Tide IV Aid must be returned 

Calculate amount of unearned Title IV Aid due from the 

school 

Determine return of funds by school 

Determine the return of funds by student 



Any federal funds that must be returned to federal programs as a result 
of the Return of Title IV calculations must be redistributed in the 
following order: 

1 . Unsubsidized FFEL/Direct Stafford Loan 

2. Subsidized FFEL/Direct Stafford Loan 

3. Perkins Loan 

4. FFEL/Direct PLUS (Graduate Student) 

5. FFEL/Direct PLUS (Parent) 

6. Pell Grant 

7. Academic Competitiveness Grant 

8. National SMART Grant 

9. FSEOG 

10. Other Tide IV Grant Funds 

Federal work-study wages will not be considered returnable. 

*Please note: Students may owe money to the College as a result of the 
Return to Tide IV calculation. 

The Student Financial Services Office is notified by the Registrar's 
Office of all withdrawals from the College. The coordinator of financial 
aid will, within 45 days of the withdrawal date, complete the calculation 
and determine the result. The student will be notified of the refund 
calculation results by memo and also by receiving a revised copy of their 
student account statement. Unofficial withdrawals (students who leave 
without going through the withdrawal process) will also have the Return 
of Tide IV Funds calculation performed and will receive notification if 
the student then owes money back to the College. 

For more specific information regarding the Return of Tide IV Funds 
calculations, see the Student Financial Services Office. 



Refund of Credit Balances 

When a credit on a student account results from overpayment or from 
federal and state financial aid that exceeds direct charges, a refund will 
be issued to the student from the Student Financial Sendees Office. 
Student refunds will only be issued for amounts up to the actual credit 
balance on the student account. No refund will be authorized or issued 
in anticipation of financial aid that will be ultimately posted to the 
student account. No refunds will be made before the official drop/add 
period for a particular semester or session. If the credit refund was 
created by proceeds from a parent PLUS Loan, the refund will be 
mailed to the parent borrower. In cases involving federal financial aid, 
federal guidelines will prevail. Student refund checks are automatically 
mailed each Friday to the student's local address. 

In addition, institutional scholarships and grant awards may not exceed 
student account charges; under no circumstances will a student receive a 
credit balance refund for institutional scholarships or grants. 

Students may be required to pay back refunds if one of the following 
occurs: 

• A change in enrollment status 

• The receipt of outside financial aid assistance 

Students withdrawing from school who have received federal financial 
aid and/or institutional scholarships will have their account adjusted 
using the appropriate refund schedule. 

Textbooks 

Textbooks may be purchased at the Milligan College Bookstore. The 
Bookstore accepts checks, cash, money orders, Visa, Discover, 
American Express, and MasterCard. The cost of textbooks generallv 
ranges from $300 to $500 per semester, depending upon the major. 

Student Financial Services offers a program that allows students to 
charge their textbooks direcdy to their student account using the 
Textbook Charge Option. Students may make this choice on the 
Statement Option Form enclosed with the Student Statement prior to 
each semester. Students can use financial aid in excess of charges to 
cover books, or elect to pay an additional amount to cover books. 
Please contact the Milligan College Bookstore or Student Financial 
Services Office for details. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



20 financial aid 



Financial Aid 



Financing a college education is one of the majot concerns for students 
and parents. The Student Financial Services Office at Miiligan College 
assists families in completing the necessary steps to apply for financial 
aid. Financial assistance is available to eligible students in the form of 
federal, state, and institutional aid. Miiligan College offers scholarships, 
grants, loans, and work-study programs. 

Any student who applies for admission to Miiligan College is eligible to 
request financial assistance. The types of federal, state, and institutional 
aid available and how to apply are discussed over the next few pages. 



General Requirements for 
Title IV Financial Aid 



■ Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) 

■ -Apply for admission to Miiligan College 

■ Be accepted and classified as a degree-seeking student 

■ Be enrolled at least half-time (6 hours per semester for 
undergraduate students and 4.5 hours per semester for graduate 
students); Federal Pell Grant recipients will remain Pell eligible if 
enrolled less than half-time 

■ Demonstrate satisfactory academic progress based on the College's 
Title IV Federal Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress 
Policy 

This policy is described in this section of the catalog. No student may 
receive Tide IV Federal financial aid as assistance beyond twelve 
semesters of attendance. Tide IV Federal Aid (excluding Federal Work- 
Study) will generally be disbursed and credited to the student account as 
follows: 



50% Fall Semester 



50% Spring Semester 



Earnings from the Federal Work-Study and Miiligan College Work- 
Study programs are paid directly to the student on a semi-monthly basis 
and will not be credited to the student's account. 



Definition of Terms 

Grants 

Financial assistance that does not have to be repaid. Eligibility is 
determined by the student's financial need. 

Loans 

Low interest government-subsidized and unsubsidized loans to be 
repaid after the student leaves school. 

Scholarships 

Financial awards funded by the College (tuition discounting) for full- 
time students. 

Employment 

On-campus jobs to give students an opportunity to earn money while in 
college. The maximum amount a student may earn (award amount) 
depends on financial need and the amount of funding the College has 
for the program. The Student Financial Services Office determines 
monetary awards. The Personnel Director assigns positions. Wages are 
paid bi-monthly based on hours worked. 



Miiligan College Programs 



Available 
Assistance 



Award Criteria 



Amounts 
Available 



Honor. Scholarships 



Mllligan's most prestigious merit-based 
scholarships. To be eligible for these 
scholarships, applicants must be admitted 
to the College by January 31. Late 
applicants will be considered if funds are 
still available. 



Award amounts range 
from $7,500 to $20,000 

annually 



Academic Scholarships 


Awards are based on the applicants 


Award amounts range 




ACT/SAT and high school grade point 


from $3,000 to $7,000 




average or previous college GPA (transfer 


annually. 




applicants). 




Miiligan College Grants 


Need-based and determined primarily 
from financial need. Awards made on the 
basis of criteria established by the College 
administration. 


Up to $3,000 annually. 


Fine Arts Scholarships 


Based on the applicants ability in theatre 
or art and the discretion of the respective 

faculty representative- 


Award amounts vary. 


Music Scholarship 


Based on the applicant's ability in music 
and the discretion of the respective faculty 
representative. 


Award amounts vary. 


Area Outstanding 


Upperclassmen in each academic area. 


Award amounts vary. 


Student Scholarships 


Based on student's overall GPA and 


These are one-year 




individual promise in designated major. 


awards. 



Athletic Scholarships 



Minimum requirements: Accepted for 
admission and selected by coach. 
Scholarships available for Basketball, 
Baseball, Softball, Volleyball, Tennis, 
Cross-Country, Track and Field, Golf, 
Soccer, Swimming, and Cheerieading. 



Award amounts vary 
based on the sport and 
the student's athlete 
ability. 

If combined with other 
scholarship awards the 
total award for an 
individual student may 
not exceed $13,000. 



Betty Goah Scholarship 



Awarded to traditionally under-represented 
ethnic minority students from Tennessee 
with U.S. citizenship or permanent U.S. 
residence status. Must have a 3.0 overall 
GPA. Minimum 21 ACT (980 SAT). 



Scholarship covers 
balance of tuition, room, 
and board not covered by 
federal and/or state 
grant aid or outside 
scholarships. 



Varying award amounts 
to Achievement Test top 



NACC Bible Bowl Any member of the first or second place 

Scholarship Bible Bowl Team at the North American 

Christian Convention. Also awards to the scorers, 
top 20 scorers on the Individual 
Achievement Test Must maintain 2.5 GPA. 

College Personnel Grant Individuals employed by the College for at Up to full tuition for 
least one year and their dependents bachelor's degree 

(spouse and children). Must maintain a programs. 
2.0 GPA. 



Miiligan College Work- 
Study Employment 



Full-time (12 credit hours) undergraduate 
students who desire work and meet 
eligibility requirements. 



From $820 to $1,640 
annually. 



Title IV Federal Financial Aid 
Satisfactory Academic Progress 
Policy 

Students must demonstrate their ability to perform satisfactorily by 
grade point average (qualitative) and by hours attempted/ completed 
(quantitative). Miiligan College will use the following standards to 
determine satisfactory progress of all students in relation to Title IV 
funding. Grade point average (GPA) and hours completed will be 
reviewed at the end of each semester. 



Undergraduate 
Qualitative Standards 



Graduate 
Qualitative Standard 



Satisfactory cumulative GPAs for students will be All graduate students must 
as follows: maintain 2.0 or higher 

cumulative GPA 



Sophomore: 26 hours earned must have a 1.6 



Junior: 58 hours earned must have a 2.0 



Senior: 92 hours earned must have a 2.0 



miiligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



financial aid 21 



Freshmen will be warned at the end of their first semester if their GPA 
and hours completed do not seem to be meeting the quantitative or 
qualitative standards. The warning letter will indicate that by the end of 
their Freshmen year they must have a 1.6 cumulative GPA and they 
must have completed 26 semester hours in order to be maintaining 
satisfactory progress. 

Students who have an unacceptable cumulative GPA, but have shown a 
substantial improvement during the semester by attaining a 2.0 will 
continue to receive aid on a semester to semester basis. 

Undergraduate Quantitative Standards 



Enrollment of 

1 2 hours or more (full-time) 



Vt time 9, 10, or 11 hours 
Vz time 6, 7, or 8 hours 

Graduate Quantitative Standards 

Enrollment of 



Minimum hrs 

satisfactorily comp. 

9 hours Freshman and 

Sophomore 

12 hours Junior or Senior 

9 hours 

6 hours 



9 hours or more (full-time) 

3 /4 time 6 3 /4, 7, 8 

Vi time 4 V2 hours, 5, 6 



Minimum hrs 
satisfactorily comp . 
9 hours 
6 Vt hours 
4 Vi hours 



Students who have not met the Qualitative or Quantitative Standards 
and/or shown substantial improvement during the semester by attaining 
a 2.0 semester GPA will be granted a one semester probationary period. 
If at the end of the probationary period Qualitative or Quantitative 
standards are not met and/or the semester GPA is less than a 2.0 all 
federal financial aid eligibility will be lost. 

■ Satisfactory grades are defined as A, B, C, D, and S. 

■ Unsatisfactory grades are F, W, I, U (Unsatisfactory) 

■ An Incomplete is counted as no hours completed. 

■ Courses repeated to raise a passing grade do not count toward 
satisfactory progress for the semester that the course is repeated. 

■ Courses repeated to raise an F do count toward satisfactory 
progress for the semester that the course is repeated. 

Although a student must pass the stated hours to retain aid, class 
progression is also important. Therefore, a student will have 3 semesters 
to change from one class level to the next. A student will be allowed 1 2 
semesters until graduation. 

Appeals 

Should extenuating circumstances prevent the student from passing the 
minimum number of classes, an appeal can be submitted, in writing, to 
the Student Financial Services Office. Some examples of acceptable 
reasons are as follows: 



1. 



Serious illness or accident, preventing the student from 

attending a significant number of classes. 

Death or serious illness in the student's immediate family, 

preventing attendance of a significant number of classes. 

Cancellation of a class by Milligan. 

Change of major where credits were not transferable. 



Appeals must be submitted by three weeks after grades have been made 
available for the preceding semester. 

Any student who has been academically dismissed will be granted one 
probationary period where they can receive Title IV financial aid. 
Should a student be dismissed again for academic reasons, that student 
will have to demonstrate satisfactory progress for a semester, upon 
subsequent readmission, before receiving financial aid. 



Students may enroll during summer sessions to attain satisfactory- 
progress. It is the student's responsibility to see that the Student 
Financial Services Office is aware of changes. 



Scholarship Guidelines, 
Milligan College 

Minimum Requirements to Retain 
Honors Scholarships (Oosting) 

■ Maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.6 by the end 
of the freshman year and a cumulative grade point average of 
3.75 each year thereafter. 

■ Be a full-time student and live in campus housing. 

■ Comply with the following regulations including: 

1 . Be a good citizen on campus 

2. Represent the school in a dignified and respectable 

manner; 

3. Comply with all moral and lifestyle expectations as set 
forth in the Student Handbook; 

4. Provide ten hours per week in tutorial service beginning 
with the sophomore year. 

Minimum requirements to Retain Honors Scholarships 
(Hopwood and Todd Beamer Scholarship for Christian 
Leadership) 

■ Maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 by the end 
of the freshman year and each year thereafter. 

■ Be a full-time student and live in campus housing. 

■ Comply with designated social regulations including: 

1. Be a good citizen on campus; 

2. Represent the school in a dignified and respectable 

manner; 

3. Comply with all moral and lifestyle expectations as set 
forth in the Student Handbook; 

4. For a student receiving the Todd Beamer Scholarship 
for Christian Leadership, be involved in a campus 
leadership position. 

Minimum Requirements to Retain Academic Scholarships 
(Presidential, Academic Dean, Transfer) 

■ Maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 by the end 
of the second semester of enrollment, 2.5 by the end of the 
fourth semester, and 2.5 each semester thereafter. 

■ Be a full-time student. 

■ Comply with the following regulations, which include: 

1. Be a good citizen on campus; 

2. Represent the school in a dignified and respectable 

manner; 

3. Comply with all moral and lifestyle expectations as set 
forth in the Student Handbook. 

Minimum Requirements to Retain 
Music and Fine Arts Scholarships 

■ Continue to major in the area in which the scholarship is 
awarded and make normal progress towards a degree as a 
full-time student. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



22 financial aid 



■ Maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 by the end 
of the second semester of enrollment, 2.5 by the end of the 
fourth semester, and 2.5 each year thereafter. 

■ Comply with the following regulations, which include: 

1 . Be a good citizen on campus; 

2. Represent the school in a dignified and respectable 
manner; 

3. Comply with all moral and lifestyle expectations as set 
forth in the Student Handbook; 

4. Enthusiastically participate in the activities of the 
academic area of the award. 

Minimum Requirements to Retain 
Athletic Scholarships 

■ Remain academically eligible for intercollegiate athletics and 
make normal progress towards a degree as a full-time student. 

■ Comply with the following regulations, which include: 



1. 
2. 



4. 
5. 

6. 



Be a good citizen on campus; 

Represent the school in a dignified and respectable 

manner; 

Comply with all moral and lifestyle expectations as set 

forth in the Student Handbook; 

Apply for any possible federal and state aid; 

Respect the directions of the coaching staff and college 

officials; 

Enthusiastically participate in the intercollegiate sport in 

which the scholarship award is made. 



Students receiving an athletic scholarship award are eligible for 
Presidential Scholarships, and Academic Dean's Scholarships but may 
not receive Transfer Scholarships, Alumni and Friends Awards, or 
Milligan College Grants. 



Scholarship/Grant Policies, 
Milligan College 

■ All academic scholarships and grants provided by Milligan College 
are available to full-time undergraduate students only. 

■ All academic scholarships and grants provided by Milligan College 
are renewable for up to eight semesters as long as the recipient 
reapplies each year through the Student Financial Services Office 
and continues to meet the criteria for the scholarship/grant. 
Students who continue their education beyond the eight semesters 
will not be eligible for those scholarships. Any exceptions must be 
made by petitioning the Appeal 

Committee before completion of the eight semesters. 

■ Scholarship recipients who leave Milligan College or begin 
attending on a part-time basis for more than two consecutive 
semesters must reapply for scholarships and will be treated as 
a new student. 



■ Institutional scholarships and grants awarded by the College 
may not exceed Milligan student account charges; under no 
circumstances will a student receive a credit balance for 
institutional scholarships or grants. 

■ Scholarship recipients who have failed to meet the minimum 
grade point average requirements and consequently lose area 
or academic scholarships may have their scholarship 
reinstated if the required minimum grade point average is 
achieved the following semester. The scholarship will then be 
reinstated for the next semester. However, it is the 
responsibility of the student to notify the Student Financial 
Services Office so that the grade point average can be verified 
with the Registrar's Office and, if appropriate, reinstate the 
scholarship. 

■ Admitted applicants to Milligan College who already hold a 
baccalaureate degree may be considered for the merit-based 
transfer scholarship according to their previous collegiate 
academic profile and the present requirements for a transfer 
scholarship. Such students must be seeking a second 
undergraduate degree as part of the traditional day program 
of the College and be enrolled full-time. College-funded 
need-based grants are not available. (Policy as of December 
2002) 

Appeals Process for Renewal of 

College Study Grant or Founders Scholarship 

■ A student who is receiving awards from the appeal process 
may be considered for renewal in future years by re-applying. 

■ These awards are made for one year; therefore, students who 
would like to be considered for the award again must contact 
the Student Financial Services Office and ask that their names 
be placed in the next Financial Aid Review (appeals) meeting. 
The Appeals Committee will review each student's need 
(from the FAFSA results) and/or academic performance and 
make a decision as to whether or not to reinstate the award 
for another year. 

Policy of Transfer Credits Counting 
toward Cumulative GPA 

■ Students who entered Milligan College spring 2001 or later 
will not have transfer grades applied to their cumulative GPA. 
Therefore, for scholarship purposes, grades for transfer work 
(including summer courses taken at other colleges) will not 
count towards the cumulative GPA. Students who wish to 
improve their cumulative GPA over the summer in order to 
have scholarships reinstated must take summer classes at 
Milligan College. 

■ Students who entered Milligan College before spring 2001 
may count transfer grades towards the cumulative GPA and 
also may take summer courses at other colleges to improve 
their GPA. 



Students receiving athletic scholarships are not eligible for the 
Alumni and Friends Award, Transfer Scholarship, or Milligan 
College Grants. These students may be eligible for the 
Presidential Scholarship, and the Academic Dean's 
Scholarship. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



financial aid 23 



State Programs 



Tennessee Education Lottery 
Scholarship Programs 



Available 
Assistance 



Award Criteria 



Amounts 
Available 



State Grant (TN*) Must be eligible to receive Federal Pell 

Grant Money that does not have to be 
repaid. 



*Up to $4,644 peryearfor 
incoming students and up to 
$5,538 for students who 
have received the grant in 
this amount in a previous 
year. 



Tennessee Teaching 
Scholars Loan 
Forgiveness Program 



Tennessee resident US citizen. 
Applicant cannot be a licensed teacher 
or receive the scholarship while 
employed in a teaching position. 
College juniors, seniors, and post- 
baccalaureate students admitted to a 
teachereducation program at an 
eligible Tennessee postsecondary 
institution. Undergraduate students 
must be enrolled full-time, graduate 
students at least half-time. Application 
deadline April 15. 



Up to $4,500 with a 
maximum of 4 years 
eligibility. Loan forgiveness 
has an employment 
obligation. 



Tennessee Math and 
Science Teacher 
Loan Forgiveness 
Program 



Tenured Tennessee public school 
teacher seeking certification or 
advanced degree in math or science 



Information about this 
program is available at 
www.CollegePaysTN.com. 
Loan forgiveness requires an 
employment obligation. 



Robert C.Byrd 
Honors Scholarship 



Tennessee resident and U.S. citizen or 
permanent resident who is an entering 
freshman with an unweighted 3.5 high 
school GPA or an average GED score of 
570 or entering freshman with at least 
a 3.0 high school GPA with at least a 
24 ACT or 1090 SAT. Must be used 
immediately following high school 
graduation or receipt of a GED. 
Application deadline March 1. 



Award amount based on 
Federal funding; 
renewable for a total of 4 
undergraduate years. 



NedMcWherter Tennessee resident and U.S. citizen 

Scholars Program who is an enteringfreshman with a 3.5 

high school GPA and a 29 ACT or 1280 

SAT. 

Application deadline February 15. 



Up to $6,000 peryearfor a 
maximum offouryearsatan 
eligibleTennessee 
postsecondary institution. 



MinorityTeaching 
Fellows Program 



Minority Tennessee resident and U.S. 
citizen who is an enteringfreshman 
with a 2.75 high school GPA and at 
least 18 ACT or 860 SAT. 
Continuing college student with a 
college GPA of 2.5. 
Application deadline April 15. 



$5,000 per year; maximum 
of $20,000 over four years 
at a Tennessee 
postsecondary institution. 



Christa McAuliffe 
Scholarship 



Tennessee resident and U.S. citizen 
who is a college senior enrolled full- 
time and admitted to a teacher 
education program at an eligible 
Tennessee postsecondary institution. 
Application deadline April 1. 



Award amount based on 
funding but may not exceed 
$500. 



Dependent 
Children's 
Scholarship 



Dependent children of law enforcement 
officers, firemen, or emergency medical 
technicians who were killed or 
permanently disabled in the line of duty 
while employed in Tennessee. Must be 
a Tennessee resident and a U.S. citizen. 
Must be enrolled full time as an 
undergraduate student at an eligible 
Tennessee postsecondary institution. 
Application deadline July 15. 



Award amount based on 
state funding and student's 
direct cost coordinated with 
other aid; renewable for four 
undergraduate years. 



*For additional information regarding available financial aid provided by 
Tennessee, contact Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation at 
800.342.1663 or www.CollegePaysTN.com. 



Available 
Assistance 



Award Criteria 



Amounts 
Available 



Tennessee HOPE Tennessee resident by September 1 of senioryear Up to $3,800 at an 

Scholarship in an eligible high school. Firsttime applicants eligible four-year 

must be entering freshmen. Students must be Tennessee 

admitted to and enrolled at least half-time in an postsecondary 

eligible Tennessee postsecondary institution no institution; Awards to 

laterthan 16 months following graduation from part-time students 

high school, home school or GED program. are prorated. 

Minimum unweighted 3.0 GPA OR 21 ACT (980 Scholarship awards 

SAT). Home school graduates: 21 ACT (980 SAT) or based on available 

525 GED and 21 ACT 980 SAT). Renewal criteria: funding from State 

must have cumulative GPA of 2.75 after 24 Lottery, 
attempted hours; must have a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 3.0 after48,72,96, and 120 

attempted semester hours 

General Must be HOPE eligible. Minimum weighted 3.75 $1,000 supplement 

Assembly GPA and 29 ACT (1280 SAT). Home school to the Tennessee 

Merit students must complete 12 college credit hours HOPE Scholarship. 

Scholarship (at least 4 courses with a minimum of 3.0 GPA) at Scholarship awards 

a Tennessee college or university while they are based on available 

enrolled in a home school program. Renewal funding from State 

criteria: Same as Tennessee HOPE Scholarship. Lottery. 

Aspire Award Must meet HOPE Scholarship requirements and $1,500 supplement 
parents' or independent students and spouse's to the Tennessee 
adjusted gross income must be $36,000 or less HOPE Scholarship, 
on the IRS tax form. Renewal criteria: Same as Scholarship awards 
Tennessee HOPE Scholarship. Student may based on available 
receive either Aspire Award or General Assembly funding from State 
Merit Scholarship (GAMS) but not both. Lottery. 



Tennessee HOPE Minimum unweighted 2.75 GPA and 18 ACT 
Access Grant (860SAT). Parents' or independent student's and 

spouse's adjusted gross income of $36,000 or 
less. May be eligible for Tennessee HOPE 
Scholarship in the second year by meeting HOPE 
Scholarship renewal criteria. 



$2,650 at an eligible 
four-year Tennessee 
postsecondary 
institution; 
Scholarship awards 
based on available 
funding from State 
Lottery. 



Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after January 1 at 
www.fafsa.gov. Application priority date Is February 15. Early application 
is recommended. To renew award, complete renewal FAFSA. 



APPLICATION 

PROCESS FOR 

THETENNESSEE 

EDUCATION 

LOTTERY 

SCHOLARSHIP 

PROGRAMS 



*For additional or the most current information specific to the 
Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Program(s), contact 
Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation at 800.342.1663 or 
www.CollegePaysTN.com OR contact the Milligan College Student 
Financial Services Office at 800.447.4880. 

*For additional information specific to the renewal criteria and/or the 
appeal process, particularly due to loss of the Tennessee Education 
Lottery Scholarship(s), based on renewal criteria, contact the Student 
Financial Services Office at 800.447.4880. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



24 financial aid 



Federal Programs 



Available 
Assistance 



Award Criteria 



Amounts 
Available 



'Federal Pell Grant Based on results of information 

submitted on the Free Application for 
Federal Aid (FAFSA) and Federal 
Methodology. Need based federal grant 

* 'Academic U.S. citizen; Federal Pell Grant recipient 
Competitiveness enrolled full-time in a degree program; 
Grant Program enrolled in the 1" or 2" academic year of 
program of study. Must have completed a 
rigorous secondary program of study 
(after Jan. 1, 2006, if a first year student 
and after Jan. 1,2005, if a second year 
student Must have at least a 3.0 on a 4.0 
scale for the first academic year. 



"National SMART 
Grant Program 



U.S. citizen; Federal Pell Grant recipient; 
enrolled full-time in a degree program; 
with a major in physical, life, or computer 
science, engineering, mathematics, 
technology, or a critical foreign language; 
and have at least a cumulative 3.0 GPA 
on a 4.0 scale in the coursework required 
for the student's major. 



Awards range from 
$400 to $4,310 



$750 for the first 
academic year of study; 
$1,300 for the second 
academic year of study 



$4,000 for each of the 
third and fourth years 
of study 



Federal 


Students must have exceptional financial 


Awards based on 


Supplemental 


need. Priority given to Pell Grant 


federal funding level. 


Education 


recipients. Need based federal grant. 


Generally range from 


Opportunity Grant 




$250 to $1,000 


(FSEOG) 




annually 


Federal Work Study 


Undergraduate students who are enrolled 


From $820 to $1,640 




at least half-time who desire work and 


annually. 




meet the eligibility requirements. 




Federal Perkins 


Low interest (5%) loan for students with 


Awards based on 


Loan 


exceptional need. Repayment beginning 


federal funding level. 




9 months after ceasing to be enrolled less 


Generally range from 




than half-time. 


$500 to $2,000 
annually 


Federal Stafford 


Must indicate on your award letter your 


Annual Loan Limits 


Student Loan 


intent to borrow 


$3,500-Dependent 


Programs 




1st Yr. Students 




Must complete a Master Promissory Note 


$7,500-lndependent 


Subsidized and 


(MPN) and Entrance Loan Counseling 


1st Yr. Students 


Unsubsidized 




$4,500-Dependent 




Subsidized-Need based, government 


2nd Yr. Students 




pays interest while student is in college. 


$8,500-lndependent 




Unsubsidized-Available to all students, 


2nd Yr. Students 




not need-based. Interest accrues while 


$5,500-Other 




student is in college. 


Dependent 

Undergraduates 

$10,500-Other 

Independent 

Undergraduates 

$20,500-Graduate or 

Professional Students 



Federal Parent PLUS Low cost parent and graduate student Cost - Financial Aid = 

Loan for loan program, not need-based. Minimum Annual Eligibility 

Undergraduate monthly payment $50. Repayment begins 

Students or PLUS within 60 days after loan is disbursed. 

Loan for Graduate 

Students 

*The college will recalculate a Federal Pell Grant award for any student 
who changes his or her enrollment status through the last date to 
"add/drop" courses during a semester. The award amount may increase 
or decrease, based on the enrollment status change. This policy is 
applied consistendy to all students. 

** For both the Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and the 
National SMART Grant Programs, the amount of the student's grant in 
combination with the student's Federal Pell Grant Assistance and other 
resources, and estimated financial assistance may not exceed the 
student's financial need (Cost of Attendance - EFC = Financial Need). 
A student may not receive more than one ACG or National SMART 
Grant award in each academic year for which the student is eligible. All 
annual award amounts for an academic year may be ratably reduced if 
sufficient funds are not available for all eligible students nationallv in an 
award year. 



Financial Aid Programs, based on 
eligibility, for Graduate Students 

(M.B.A., M.Ed., M.S.O.T.) 

■ Federal Perkins Loan Program 

■ Federal Stafford Student Loan Programs - Subsidized and 
Unsubsidized 

■ Federal PLUS Loan for Graduate Students 

■ Refer to the description of federal programs in the Financial Aid 
section of the catalog for award criteria and amounts available. 

Alternative Loan Programs (Contact the Student Financial Services 
Office at 800.447.4880 for information.) 



Disbursements of Financial Aid 

■ Generally, financial aid disbursements are made at the 
beginning of each semester. Exceptions occur during summer 
as it may be necessary to disburse financial aid in more than 
one disbursement to comply with federal guidelines related to 
the enrollment status of the student during each summer 
session. Contact your Student Financial Services Counselor 
for assistance with summer financial aid. 

■ In summer, Federal Pell, SEOG and Perkins funds can not be 
disbursed until after July 1 to disburse in accordance with the 
beginning of the federal fiscal year. 

■ For students attending one semester during the academic 
year, there will be one disbursement at the beginning of the 
semester. Loan eligibility is prorated based on the number of 
hours you are taking during your last semester of study if you 
are in an undergraduate program. 

■ Financial aid awards are adjusted if the student drops or adds 
credit hours during the drop/add period. The only exception 
occurs for traditional undergraduate students who are taking 
12 to 18 credit hours as the full-time tuition charge remains 
the same during this range. 

" If your financial aid disbursements create a credit balance on 
your student account, then the Student Financial Services 
Office will mail the credit refund check to your local address 
after the drop/add period has ended. If the credit refund was 
created by proceeds from a parent PLUS Loan, the refund 
will be mailed to the parent borrower. 



Financial Aid Application Process 

The process of applying for Federal Pell Grant, Academic 
Competitiveness Grant (ACG), National SMART Grant, Federal 
SEOG, Federal Work Study, Milligan College Work Study, Federal 
Subsidized Stafford Loan, Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Federal 
Perkins Loan, Federal Parent PLUS Loan, Tennessee Student 
Assistance Award, Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Programs, 
and Milligan College Scholarship is as follows: 

1 . Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and 
submit it to the federal processor (electronic version: 
www.fafsa.ed.gov). 

a. Be sure to include Milligan's code (00351 1) on the FAFSA 

b. For a Tennessee Student Assistance award, students should 
complete the FAFSA by March 1 . 

c. The FAFSA is also your application for the Tennessee 
Education Lottery Scholarship (TELS/HOPE Program). The 
deadline for application may vary each year due to the 
availability of funds. 



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financial aid 25 



2. Milligan College Financial Aid/Scholarship Renewal Application: 

a. Incoming students are not required to complete this 
application. An admission application must be completed, 
and students must receive acceptance into the College. 

b. Returning students must complete this application to renew 
their initial academic/athletic scholarship and/or Milligan 
College Grant award. 

c. Non-traditional students (Adult Degree Completion Program, 
Master of Business Administration, Master of Education, 
Master of Science in Occupational Therapy) must complete 
the Milligan College Financial Aid/Scholarship Renewal 
Application for Non-Traditional Students. 

3. To accept Federal Financial Aid, students must sign and return 
their award letter. 

4. To accept a Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Perkins Loan, 
students must indicate their intent to borrow on their award letter. 
Loans will be certified electronically. Before loans will be 
processed, students must sign a Master Promissory Note (MPN) 
with their lender, complete entrance loan counseling, and be pre- 
registered. More information may be obtained from the Student 
Financial Services Office or online at www.milligan.edu/sfs. 

5. Parents or graduate students wishing to apply for the Federal 
PLUS Loan should contact the Student Financial Services Office 
so loan eligibility can be determined. After PLUS loan eligibility 
has been determined, Parent Borrowers or graduate students are 
required to complete Milligan College's PLUS Loan Request Form 
and the PLUS Loan Master Promissory Note (MPN). A list of 
PLUS lenders is available at www.milligan.edu/sfs or in the 
Student Financial Services Office. Parents or graduate students 
may complete the MPN online at www.milligan.edu/sfs or request 
a paper MPN by calling the Student Financial Services Office. 

6. Quickly respond to any other document requests you receive from 
the Student Financial Services Office. 

7. If you feel that a mistake has been made regarding your financial 
aid or student account information, you may consult with your 
SFS counselor to be advised of the appropriate action. 



Financial Aid Calendar 

It is important to meet the priority deadlines and to respond quickly to 
requests from the Student Financial Services Office for additional 
documentation. Some awards are issued on a first-come, first-served 
basis. 

February 15 Priority deadline for completing the FAFSA online 

at www.fafsa.ed.gov 

March 1 Priority deadline for having your financial aid 

file complete (FAFSA filed and requested 
documents submitted) 



Student Rights 

All students have the right to know: 

a. The cost of attending a particular school and the school's policy on 
refunds to students who withdraw (Milligan College Catalog). 

b. The forms of available financial assistance, including information 
on all federal, state, local, private, and institutional financial aid 
programs (Milligan College Catalog; Student Financial Services 
website; Award Letter Instruction Booklet) . 

c. The identity of the school's financial aid personnel, their location, 
and how to contact them for information (Milligan College 
Student Handbook). 

d. The procedures and deadlines for submitting applications for each 
available financial aid program (Milligan College Catalog). 

e. The methods through which the school determines financial need. 
This process includes methods of determining costs for tuition and 
fees, room and board, travel, books and supplies, and personal and 
miscellaneous expenses. It also includes the resources considered 
in calculating need (such as other outside scholarships, veteran 
benefits, etc.) (Milligan College Catalog or Student Financial 
Services Website link to www.studentaid.ed.gov/pubs 

f. How and when the student receives financial aid (Student 
Financial Services website). 

g. An explanation of each type and amount of assistance in the 
financial aid package (Award Letter and Award Letter Instruction 
Booklet). 

h. The interest rate on any student loan, the total amount that must 
be repaid, the acceptable time frame for repayment, and any 
applicable cancellation or deferment (postponement) provisions 
(SFS and lender websites). 

i. Work Study Guidelines if a federal work-study job is assigned 

(nature of job, required hours, pay rate, and method of payment). 
This information is available in the Work Study Guidelines 
brochure, and the Work Studv Contract. 

j. The school's policy in reconsidering your aid package if you 

believe a mistake has been made, or if your enrollment or financial 
circumstances have changed (Milligan College Catalog and Award 
Instruction Booklet). 

k. The manner in which the school determines satisfactory academic 
progress according to guidelines for receiving Federal Tide XV 
financial assistance and the school's policies for addressing 
unsatisfactory academic performance. The Tide IV Satisfactory 
Progress Policy is stated in this catalog or is available in the 
Student Financial Services Office. 

Student Responsibilities 

All students must: 



Student Rights and Responsibilities 

As recipients of federal student aid (as opposed to state, institutional, or 
private aid), students have certain rights and responsibilities. Being 
aware of these rights and responsibilities enables students to make 
informed decisions about their educational goals and the best means of 
achieving them. 



b. 



Complete the Free Application For Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) 
and either the Milligan College Admissions Application or the 
Milligan College Financial Aid/Scholarship Renewal Application 
and submit them on time. Errors can delay or prevent the 
awarding of aid. 

Know and comply with all deadlines for applying or re-applying 
for aid. 



milligan college academic catalog I 2007-08 I www milligan.edu 



26 financial aid 



c. Provide all documentation, corrections, and/or new information 
to the Student Financial Services Office. 

d. Notify the Student Financial Services Office of any information 
that has changed since the original application was completed. 

e. Read, understand, and keep copies of all financial aid forms signed. 

f. Repay any student loans. Signing a promissory note indicates 
agreement to repay the loan. 

g. Complete both an entrance and exit interview if awarded a Federal 
Perkins Loan, Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan, or Federal 
Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. 



New and transfer student veterans are required to provide a photocopy 
of Member Copy 4 of Department of Defense (DD) Form 214, 
Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty, a copy of DD 
Form 2366 Montgomery GI Bill Act of 1984 (GI Bill election form), if 
available, or other veterans educational assistance benefit 
entidement/eligibility documents, including but not limited to college 
fund contracts if any. Reservists and members of the National Guard 
need to provide DD Form 2384, Selected Reserve Educational 
Assistance Program Notice of Basic Eligibility. Dependents of totally 
and permanently service-connected disabled (or deceased) veterans 
applying for educational assistance benefits should provide a copy of 
the disabled veteran Rating Decision or a copy of their USDVA 
Certificate of Eligibility, if received from a previously submitted 
application. 



h. Notify the Student Financial Services Office and the lending 

institution(s) of any change in name, address, or enrollment status 
(the number of credits in which a student is enrolled during any 
given semester). 

i. Demonstrate satisfactory performance in any assigned Federal 
Work-Study job. 

For more financial aid information, contact: 
Milligan College Student Financial Services Office 
P. O. Box 250, Milligan College, TN 37682 
800.447.4880 • 423.461.8949 • www.milligan.edu/SFS 



Veterans Education Benefits 

Milligan College is eligible to receive veterans and other eligible persons 
who are entided to benefits under Chapters 30, 32, and 35 (Tide 38 
United States Code), and Chapter 1606 (Tide 10 United States Code). 



Veterans in an undergraduate standing are required to provide any 
available official uniformed services evaluations of education, training, 
and experience that have been prepared in accordance with the 
American Council on Education's Guide to the Evaluation of 
Educational Experiences in the Armed Services and/or National Guide 
to Educational Credit for Training ("ACE Guides"). Academic credit is 
generally awarded for formal education and training only. 

To receive VA education benefits while attending Milligan College, 
undergraduate students must meet the following academic standards: 

■ Sophomores (26 hours earned) must have a 1 .6 GPA. 

■ Juniors (58 hours earned) must have a 1.8 GPA. 

■ Seniors (92 hours earned) must have a 2.0 GPA. 

Payments are made each month direcdy to the veteran. The Veterans 
Administration provides counseling and vocational planning services for 
any veteran who needs this assistance. Students who desire additional 
information may contact their nearest Veterans Administration Office 
or write to the Registrar's Office of Milligan College. 



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academic policies 27 



Academic Policies 



General Policies 

1 . The candidate for the bachelor's degree must have completed the 
general education requirements, a major, and electives to total a 
minimum of 1 28 hours of credit. 

2. Students may graduate under the regulations prescribed in the 
Catalog in effect at the rime of their entrance into the College, 
provided these requirements are met within six years; otherwise 
they are required to meet current degree requirements. The six- 
year limitation is extended for the length of time in military service 
for students who enter service after enrolling at Milligan College. 

3. Rising juniors are required to take the Academic Profile, a test 
covering general knowledge. Graduating seniors are required to 
take an examination or to complete a capstone experience or other 
evaluative experience specific to the major to demonstrate 
knowledge in their major field of study. 

4. Students diagnosed as having a deficiency in math, reading, study 
skills, and/or writing must enroll in the appropriate developmental 
studies course(s) as a graduation requirement. Hours earned below 
the 100 level will not count toward the 128-hour graduation 
requirement. 

5. Some courses listed in the Catalog are not offered every year. 
Students should consult with their advisers to plan their 
curriculum. 

6. Students must take Bible survey (BIBL 123 and 124) within their 
first two years of enrollment in Milligan College. Students should 
be encouraged by their advisers to take it as early as possible, 
especially because Bible survey is a prerequisite for many upper 
division Bible courses and BIBL 471 Christ and Culture. 

7. Humanities 101 and 102 are required of all freshmen. Humanities 
201 and 202 are required of all sophomores. Once a student 
enrolls in the traditional undergraduate program at Milligan 
College, still needing humanities courses as part of the core, those 
courses must be taken at Milligan College. Should a student 
withdraw from any of these courses, the student is nonetheless 
required to satisfactorily complete all humanities coursework by 
the end of the junior year. 

8. Psychology 100 is required of all freshmen during the first 
semester of attendance. 

9. The human performance and exercise science general education 
requirements should be satisfied in the freshman year. 



12. 



agreement of the instructor and the dean. The student should 
submit a written request for rescheduling an exam to the dean with 
faculty endorsement attending the request. 

Only the instructor may waive prerequisites for courses. See the 
catalog course description to determine if a course has 
prerequisites. 



Advisers and Mentors 

All freshmen entering Milligan College are assigned a faculty mentor 
who will function as the academic adviser for that year. All other 
students will be assigned an adviser, usually from within the discipline in 
which the student is majoring. Milligan College requires regular 
meetings between students and their academic mentors or advisers- 
three meetings per semester for freshmen, and once per semester for all 
other students. At one of those meetings, the adviser approves a 
student's schedule of classes for the following semester. Failure to meet 
with academic advisers will result in an inability to pre-register for 
classes. 

Students are especially encouraged to consult with advisers on a regular 
basis. While a student's satisfactory progress toward graduation is the 
responsibility of the student, regular contact with one's adviser can help 
ensure timely progress toward graduation. 



Campus Communication 

For official communication, including any communication from 
Milligan offices or Milligan faculty to students, the e-mail address issued 
by Milligan College will be the only e-mail address used. Notices sent 
by official Milligan e-mail will be considered adequate and appropriate 
communication. It is incumbent on students to check their official 
Milligan e-mail regularly. 



Ceremony of Matriculation 

After all admission requirements have been met, including orientation 
activities at the beginning of the year, the candidate for admission may 
participate in the ceremony of matriculation. 

The ceremony of matriculation occurs prior to the first week of the 
semester. At the conclusion of a general assembly, the candidates sign 
the matriculation book and officially become members of the Milligan 
Community. 



Classification 

Progress toward the baccalaureate degree is measured by four ranks or 
classes, which are determined by the number of hours earned. These are 
freshman; sophomore, 26 hours; junior, 58 hours; senior, 92 hours. 



1 0. Milligan College makes no provision for a system of allowed 
absences, sometimes called "cuts." The student is expected to 
attend all sessions of classes. Absence from any class session 
involves a loss in learning opportunity for which there is no 
adequate compensation. The instructor's evaluation of the 
student's work is necessarily affected by absences. Penalties for 
absences are stated in individual class syllabi. 

11. All classes must meet during final exams week for an exam or 
another significant educational activity. (Any proposed alternative 
means/meetings for assessment, such as online exams, should be 
approved first by the appropriate area chair and then by the Dean.) 
The general policy is that students may not reschedule final exams; 
however, if a student has three (3) exams scheduled on the same 
day, then he or she may request permission to reschedule one at a 
later date. Any approval for exam rescheduling will be by die 



College Calendar 



The Milligan College calendar of classes is organized on a semester 
basis. The College also offers a summer session consisting of two 4- 
week terms or one 8-week term. In addition to these regularly scheduled 
terms, students may earn one, two or three semester hours of credit 
during J anuary Term and/or May Term. January Term is a one-week 
session just before the beginning of the spring semester; May Term is 
the session between the spring semester and the summer session. 
January and May Term courses shall count as residence credit. 



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28 academic policies 



Correspondence Credit 

After entering Milligan College, undergraduate students desiring to take 
correspondence courses through another college must have prior 
written approval from the registrar. Only six semester hours of 
correspondence study are recommended, and no more than twelve 
semester hours are accepted toward a bachelor's degree program. A 
student enrolled for a correspondence course must count the number of 
correspondence hours with the regular semester load in determining a 
full load for the semester. A transcript should be sent to the Milligan 
College Registrar's Office upon the completion of the course. 



Grades of "I" must be resolved no later than the end of the semester 
(or term) following the one in which the "I" was assigned. 

With the approval of the instructor and the adviser, a student may 
withdraw from a class through the eleventh week of classes. Courses 
dropped are evaluated with the grade "W." Withdrawal from a class 
with a "W" after the eleventh week of classes requires the consent of 
the instructor, the adviser, and the dean and will only be considered in 
extenuating circumstances. The signed withdrawal form must be 
received in the Registrar's Office before the end of the last class day 
(not including final exam week) of the term. 



Course Repeat Policy 



A student may repeat any course taken at Milligan College by registering 
for the course and completing a Course Repeat Form in the Registrar's 
Office. Only the most recent grade is included in the grade point 
average. The original grade is not removed from the academic record, 
but the grades for each subsequent completion of the course are noted 
in brackets on the academic record. Students will not receive additional 
credit hours for repeated courses in which they originally earned a 
passing grade. For additional information about the course repeat 
policy, contact the Registrar's Office. 



Grade Reports 



The registrar makes available mid-semester and final grades by way of 
IQWeb, a Web interface with the student records database. The College 
issues I.Ds and passwords to enrolled students allowing them access to 
the Web interface. Upon request by the student, the registrar releases 
grades to the parent(s) of students. 



Grading System (Undergraduate) 

The terms used in evaluating a student's work are letters with a grade 
point value. Advancement to the baccalaureate degree is contingent 
upon the completion of a minimum of 128 semester hours with a total 
of no fewer than 256 quality points and a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0. The grade point average (GPA) is determined by 
dividing the total number of quality points by the GPA hours. The 
following table of values is observed in all courses. 



Grade 


Quality Points 


Significance 


A 


4.0 


Outstanding 


A- 


3.7 




B+ 


3.3 




B 


3.0 


Good 


B- 


2.7 




C+ 


2.3 




C 


2.0 


Adequate 


C- 


1.7 




D+ 


1.3 




D 


1.0 


Needs significant improvement 


D- 


0.7 




F 


0.0 


Not acceptable 


S 


None 


Satisfactory 


P 


None 


Passing 


u 


None 


Unsatisfactory 


AU 


None 


Audit 


W 


None 


Withdrawal 


1 


None 


Incomplete 



Grading System (Graduate) 

A graduate student must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 
3.0 (B) to graduate. For a complete listing of the grading scale for a 
graduate program, please see the respective program's Student Handbook. 



Graduation Requirements 

It is the policy of Milligan College that only students who have 
completed all degree requirements may participate in graduation 
ceremonies. Degrees are conferred two times a year, at the end of the 
fall and the spring semesters. Students will participate in the first 
graduation ceremony following the completion of degree requirements. 

Notice of Intention to Graduate 

Each degree-seeking candidate must file the Notice of Intention in the 
Office of the Registrar. December commencement candidates must file 
the Notice of Intention to Graduate form by September 1. May 
commencement candidates must file the Notice of Intention to 
Graduate form by February 1 . Candidates must be certified for 
graduation by the Registrar's Office by completing a transcript 
evaluation. 

All fees and other obligations shall be settled two full days before the 
date on which the degree is to be conferred. All incompletes must be 
resolved at least two days before commencement. Neither the diploma 
nor transcripts can be released until all accounts are cleared. 

All candidates for degrees are encouraged to take advantage of the 
placement service in the Career Development Office. 



Honors 

Students who have completed all requirements for the baccalaureate 
degree are awarded academic honors if the cumulative grade point 
average is 3.5 or greater. The degree with honors is divided into three 
levels as follows: Summa Cum Laude, based on a grade point average of 
at least 3.95; Magna Cum l^aude, based on a grade point average of at 
least 3.75; and Cum Laude, based on a grade point average of at least 
3.50. 

Students must earn a minimum of 70 credit hours at Milligan College to 
receive the honor of "First in Class" and "Second in Class" in the May 
commencement program. 

At the close of each semester, the Office of the Dean publishes a list of 
students who have done outstanding work during that semester. The 
Dean's List is composed of students who earned semester grade point 
averages of 3.50 to 4.00. 



NG 



None 



No grade 



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academic policies 29 



Information Technology 

MCNet 

Milligan College has installed a campus local area computer network, 
MCNet, that links all residence hall rooms with faculty and staff offices 
in addition to providing access to the Internet, application programs, 
and library services. 

Milligan College students may either connect a computer they bring to 
campus in their residence hall room or use a computer in one of the 
campus computer labs. In addition, many buildings on campus (e.g. 
Library, Derthick Hall, Webb Hall, Joe and Laura McCormick Dining 
Center, McMahan Student Center) have wireless access, and students' 
laptops can access the network through those wireless connections by 
securing an access code from the Office of Information Technology. 
Residence hall room computers may be connected to MCNet, provided 
that the student's computer conforms to minimum requirements 
(available from the Information Technology Department). Lab 
computers are already connected to MCNet. Examples of software 
available in the computer labs include Microsoft Office (e.g., Word, 
Excel, Access, and PowerPoint) and other application programs specific 
to certain courses. E-mail accounts are provided for students so that 
they may send and receive e-mail both locally and across the Internet. 

For official communication, including any communication from 
Milligan offices or Milligan faculty to students, the email address issued 
by Milligan College will be the only email address used. Notices sent by 
official Milligan email will be considered adequate and appropriate 
communication. It is incumbent on students to check their official 
Milligan email regularly. 

The Milligan College Computer Use Policy outlines expected behavior 
when using the computer network. Students are expected to conform to 
provisions outlined in the policy, a copy of which is available on the 
Milligan College Information Technology Web site. 

For further information or answers to questions, contact Information 
Technology Help Desk by calling 423.461.8704 or emailing at 
HelpDesk@Milligan.edu or visiting the Milligan College Information 
Technology Web site at www.milligan.edu/it. 

MCNet in the Residence Hall Rooms 

Each residence hall room has a network connection for each bed to 
provide access from the students' own computers to the campus 
network. The computer must have an approved Ethernet network 
adapter card installed. These cards can be purchased in the College 
Bookstore. Students are responsible for installation of network adapters 
and protocols. The Information Technology Department will furnish 
necessary information pertaining to network access. 

For the recommended minimum computer configuration for 
connecting to the network, call 423.461.8704 or visit the Milligan 
College Information Technology Web site at: www.milligan.edu/it/. 



Computer Labs 

Four networked computer labs are located on campus. The Derthick 
Computer Lab is open some weekday evenings and has twenty 
computers for student use. However, most computer classes are held in 
the Derthick Computer lab, which limits its availability. A Multimedia 
Computer Lab is located in the Paxson Communication Center and has 
ten computers and an optical image scanner. It is open some weekday 
evenings and some time each weekend upon request. Several classes use 
this lab due to the special equipment installed, which limits its 
availability. A third lab, which contains 20 computers, is located on the 
third floor of Hardin Hall, which houses the nursing and occupational 
therapy programs. A fourth lab contains 1 1 laptop computers and is 
located in the Clark Education Center. The latter two labs are 
maintained within their respective departments and students within 
those areas of study will have priority to use computers within those 
labs. Laptop computers are available to be checked out for use only in 
the library. 

Each lab also has at least one letter quality printer, and a lab assistant is 
on duty each evening and on weekends in the Information Technology 
Department to assist students in using the available resources. In 
addition, the library has a letter-quality printer on each floor which can 
be accessed through the network, either from the computers in the 
library or from laptops using the wireless network. Assistance from the 
IT Help Desk is available by calling 423.461.8704 or emailing 
HelpDesk@Milligan.edu. 

Phone Service 

Milligan College maintains its own phone network. Each room has its 
own private phone connection with voice mail. Phones, however, are 
not provided. For more information about phone service, contact the 
Information Technology department at 423.461.8704 or 
HelpDesk@Milligan.edu. 

Cable TV in the Residence Hail Rooms 

Milligan College provides access to over 60 cable TV channels, 
including some that are operated by the Milligan College 
Communications Department. Each residence hall room has one cable 
TV outlet. 

For more information about the cable TV network, contact the 
Information Technology' department at 423.461.8704 or 
HelpDesk@Milligan.edu. 



Disabilities 

Students with disabilities who require assistance should contact the 
director of disability services. 

Traci ]. Smith, Director of Disability Services 
P.O. Box 500, Milligan College, TN 37682 
423.461.8981 



Because of limited resources and staff, Milligan College has 
standardized on Intel architecture and Microsoft Windows operating 
systems. Therefore, Milligan College does not recommend that students 
connect Macintosh or other non-Intel based computers to MCNet. 
However, students with Macintosh or other non-Intel based computers 
are permitted to connect to MCNet on the condition that no support is 
to be expected from the Information Technology Department. The 
Information Technology Department guarantees only a connection to 
the plug in the residence hall room. Connecting a Macintosh or other 
non-Intel based computer limits the student to only e-mail and Internet 
access. For further information or answers to questions, contact the 
Information Technology Help Desk at 423.461.8704 or email 
HelpDesk@Milligan.edu. 



Notification of Disabilities 

It is the responsibility of the student to notify the school of his or her 
disability and to follow the process for requesting appropriate auxiliary 
services and academic adjustments. 

1. Entering students should submit a written request for 
auxiliary aids to the DDS prior to matriculation at Milligan 
College. A current student who discovers the need for 
accommodations may submit a request at any point during 
his or her academic career. 

2. Along with the written request, the student must provide 
documentation of the disability. This documentation must be 
prepared by a medical doctor, psychologist, or other qualified 
diagnostician as appropriate. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



30 academic policies 



3. Complete documentation should include a diagnosis of the 
current disability, the date of this diagnosis, how the diagnosis 
was reached, the credentials of the diagnosing professional, 
how this diagnosis affects a major life activity, and how the 
disability affects the student's academic performance. 

4. If available, the student should submit other documentation 
such as an Individualized Educational Program (IEP) or a 
section 504 plan from high school. Milligan prefers these 
plans to be dated within the past three years of submission. 

General Considerations: 

1. Upon receipt of requests for auxiliary aids, the DDS will 
procure recommendations from a professional counselor or 
occupational therapist as appropriate. 

2. In all cases, the age of the student, thoroughness of the 
documentation, and adjustments being requested will assist in 
determining whether the evidence submitted is sufficient for 
eligibility. If more documentation is required, the student will 
be informed. 

3. Based on the documentation and evaluation, the DDS will 
notify faculty members each semester of specific auxiliary aids 
and/or academic adjustments that are to be granted. 

4. When a student's documentation is lacking or insufficient or 
is considered outdated, it may be necessary to secure a new 
evaluation. The need for such an evaluation will be 
established by the college professional reviewing the request. 
In such cases, the student will be referred to a local physician 
or psychologist for evaluation. It shall be the student's 
responsibility to secure the needed evaluation by sufficiently 
trained physicians or psychologists. Without the completion 
of this step, the college will assume no responsibility for 
providing requested academic adjustments. 

5. Students will be notified of their status (eligible, ineligible, 
deferred) after the college professionals have reviewed the 
documentation. If the student is ineligible or deferred, the 
notification letter will explain what is missing. If a student is 
determined eligible, then it is the student's 
responsibility to make an appointment with the DDS to 
discuss reasonable adjustments. Adjustments will not be 
initiated prior to this meeting (i.e. priority registration, 
extended time on tests, etc.). 

Grievance Procedures 

1. In cases where students believe that the recommended 
auxiliary aids have been established in error, or where 
extenuating circumstances are present that are not adequately 
addressed in the documentation, an appeal may be made in 
writing to the ADA Committee and submitted to the DDS. 

2. Students who have been granted adjustments and believe they 
are not receiving them should appeal in writing to the ADA 
Committee and submit the letter to the DDS. 

3. The ADA Committee will convene within two weeks of 
receipt of the request, unless during a holiday recess, and will 
notify the student of its determination within two weeks after 
their initial meeting. If necessary, the ADA Committee may 
ask for additional information from the student in order to 
make a well-informed decision. 

4. If the student is displeased with the decision, he or she may 
appeal to the president of the college widiin 30 days of 
receiving the determination. 



Library Services 



The Library is a participating member in the shared online catalog of 
the Appalachian College Association (ACA) Bowen Central Library of 
Appalachia. The holdings of Milligan College are set as the default 
within the catalog display. However, the catalog allows the holdings of 
other participating ACA libraries to be searched. The Library also 
subscribes to WorldCat, an online catalog that gives Milligan students 
access, through our interlibrary loan service, to the holdings of 
thousands of libraries worldwide. Locally the Library participates in 
resource-sharing agreements with the libraries of Emmanuel School of 
Religion and East Tennessee State University (main campus and 
medical school). 

Probation and Dismissal of 
Undergraduate Students 

An undergraduate student who fails to receive a 2.0 grade point average 
during any semester of enrollment in Milligan College or who fails to 
have a 2.0 cumulative grade point average is placed on academic 
probation or dismissed. The student's social behavior and attitude 
exhibited toward academic pursuit are factors in determining probation 
or dismissal. If the student on probation fails to achieve a 2.0 the 
following semester, the College is not obligated to grant the privilege of 
further study at Milligan College. 

Milligan College is seriously concerned that every student who enters 
the College makes progress toward the attainment of a degree. 
Consequently academic progress is judged to be paramount to the many 
extracurricular activities that are available to Milligan College students. 
Every student is encouraged to participate in extracurricular activities; 
but, in those cases where participation is deemed to be detrimental to 
the student's academic progress, it is the policy of the College to limit 
such participation. To participate, the student must maintain the 
following grade average: rising sophomores, a 1.6; and rising juniors and 
seniors, a 2.0. Additional limitations may be imposed as deemed 
appropriate by the dean. 



Spiritual Formation 



The P. H. Welshimer Memorial Library is a place with learning spaces, 
books, online databases, computers, journals, wireless internet access, 
and persons to assist you. Special collections within the Library contain 
materials on the history of Milligan College and the Stone-Campbell 
Restoration Movement. 



Milligan College has a co-curricular program for spiritual formation. In 
addition to academic endeavors, all traditional students must participate 
in 1 50 spiritual formation programs to graduate. A calendar of spiritual 
formation programs including chapel services, convocations, lectures, 
campus ministry programs, and community events qualifying for this 
program will be provided each semester. 



Testing Services 

(Undergraduate Students) 

All entering students are evaluated in the basic skills of reading, writing, 
and mathematics. Proficiency in these basic areas is a graduation 
requirement. Services are provided to help students attain these 
proficiencies (see Developmental Studies). 

■ The Academic Profile exam evaluates students in general 
education requirements and is administered to entering freshman 
and/or returning juniors prior to registration in the fall. 

■ The senior major exam, which is required of all baccalaureate 
degree-seeking students and evaluates the students in their major 
fields of study, is administered on the last day of classes in 
December for December graduates and the last Friday of March 
for spring and summer graduates. In some instances, the major 
exam is incorporated into a senior-level course in the major. 
Students pursuing double majors must complete a majors exam in 
each major. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



academic policies 31 



Majors Exam Policy 



Advanced Placement (AP) Policy 



Faculty 
Created 



Major 
Field Test 



Capstone 
Course 



Accounting 


X 


Bible or Bible/Ministry 


X 


Biology 


X 


Business 
Administration 


X BADM/ECON 470 


Chemistry 


X 


Child and Youth 
Development 


These students must complete the PRAXIS II for licensure 
or PRAXIS 0021 for non-licensure. 


Communications 


C0MM475.494 


Computer Information 
Systems 


CIS/CS 450 


Early Childhood 
Development 


These students must complete the PRAXIS II for licensure 
or PRAXIS 0021 for non-licensure. 


English 


X 


Fine Arts 


ART 421 


History 


X 


Human Performance 
and Exercise Science 


X 


Humanities 


HUMN 490 


Language Arts 


X 


Mathematics 


X 


General Music 


X 


Music Education 
K-12 Instrumental 


PRAXIS 10113 (Non Licensure) 
PRAXIS 10113 & 30111 (Licensure) 


Music Education 
K-12 Vocal/General 


PRAXIS 10113 (Non Licensure) 
PRAXIS 10113 & 30111 (Licensure) 


Nursing 


NURS 460 


Psychology 


X 


Public Leadership and 
Service 


X 


Sociology 


X 



Worship Leadership X 

Milligan College recognizes that not all college-level learning occurs in a 
college classroom and awards credit earned by testing. The Testing 
Office evaluates and/or administers the following testing programs: 

■ Advanced Placement Program 

■ College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

■ DANTES Program 

■ International Baccalaureate Program 

Milligan College students may submit scores on examinations taken 
through these programs to the registrar for evaluation. College credit 
will be granted on the basis of an acceptable score earned through these 
testing programs as determined by the Academic Committee rather than 
by the testing company under the conditions below. See the tables 
below for information about AP and CLEP tests, acceptable scores, and 
credits awarded. A DANTES score that is equivalent to at least a grade 
of "B" is reviewed by the director of testing for possible course credit. 
See the director of testing for specific information about the DANTES 
Program. 



Guidelines 



1. 



At least one semester of work must be completed at Milligan 

College before credit earned by testing will be recorded on 

the transcript. 

No credit by exam will be allowed after a student has earned a 

cumulative total of 64 hours of college credit. 

A maximum of 32 semester hours can be earned by testing. 

A recording fee of SI 0.00 per hour will be charged. 



AP Test 



Score Course & Credits 



Art History 


3,4,5 


HUMN 201, 3 hours, or ART 367, 3 
hours 


Biology 


4 or 5 


BIOL 112, 4 hours 


Calculus AB 


3,4,5 


MATH 211, 4 hours 


Calculus BC 


3, 4. 5 


MATH 211 & 212, 8 hours 


Chemistry 


4 oi 5 


CHEM 170, 4 hours 


Computer Science A. AB 


3,4,5 


CIS 211, 3 hours 


English Literature OR 
English Language 


4 or 5 


HUMN 101W, 3 hours, & 
General elective, 3 hours 


Environmental Science 


3,4,5 


Lab Science, 4 hours 


European History 


4 or 5 


HUMN 101S, 3 hours. & 
HUMN 202S, 3 hours 


French Language 


3,4, 5 


FREN 111& 112, 6 hours 


German Language 


3. 4, 5 


GERM 111 & 112, 6 hours 


Government & Politics 


3,4,5 


LS 202 or POLS 202, 3 hours 


Human Geography 


3,4,5 


GE0G 202, 3 hours 


Latin 


3.4,5 


LATN 111& 112,6 hours 


Macroeconomics 


3,4,5 


EC0N 201, 3 hours 


Microeconomics 


3,4,5 


ECON 202, 3 hours 


Music Theory 


3,4,5 


MUSC 143. 3 hours 


Physics C 


3,4, 5 


PHYS 20 5, 4 hours 


Physics B 


3,4.5 


PHYS 203 & 204. 8 hours 


Psychology 


3,4.5 


PSYC 250. 3 hours 


Spanish Language 


3.4,5 


SPAN 111 & 112, 6 hours 


Statistics 


3,4,5 


MATH 213, 3 hours 


Studio Art 


3,4,5 


Fine Arts elective for Fine Arts 
majors 


US History 


4 or 5 


Elective, 6 hours (The student will 
be exempt from HUMN 101S.) 



World History 



4 or 5 



HUMN 101S, 3 hours & 
HUMN 202S, 3 hours 



http://www.collegeboard.com/ap/students /worldHstory/index.htrnl 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



32 academic policies 



CLEP Policy 



CLEP Exam 



International Baccalaureate Policy 



Credit Score 
Granted Required 



Equivalent 
Course(s) 



Composition & Literature 


American Literature 


6 


55 


Lower-division American 

literature credit 

(no credit for majors or 

minors) 


Analyzing & Interpreting 
Literature 


3 


54 


Lower-division literature 
credit 


Composition, Freshman 






Not accepted for credit. 


English Composition with 
Essay 


3 


55 


HUMN 101W 


English Literature 


3 


55 


HUMN 102 combined with 
CLEP Humanities 



Humanities 



Western Civilization I 
1648 to the Present 



56 HUMN 102 combined with 

CLEP English Literature 
HUMN 201 combined with 
CLEP Western Civilization 

II 



Science & Mathematics 


Algebra 


3 


52 


MATH 111 College 
Algebra 1 


Algebra-Trigonometry 


3 


55 


MATH 112 College 
Algebra II and 
Trigonometry 


Biology 


3 


55 


BIOL 110 General Biology 


Chemistry 


3 


55 


CHEM 170 General 
Chemistry 


Calculus with Elementary 
Functions 


3 


55 


MATH 211 Calculus 1 


College Mathematics 


3 


58 


MATH 107 Principles of 
Mathematics 


Natural Sciences 


3 


53 


Lab Science (required to 
take two 1-hour labs) 


Trigonometry 


3 


56 


Elective 


Foreign Languages 


French, Level 1 


6 


51 


FREN111&112 
Elementary French 


French, Level 2 


6 


66 


FREN211&212 
Intermediate French 


German, Level 1 


6 


51 


GERM 111 & 112 
Elementary German 


German, Level 2 


6 


64 


GERM 211 & 212 
Intermediate German 


Spanish, Level 1 


6 


51 


SPAN 111 & 112 
Elementary Spanish 


Spanish, Level 2 


6 


68 


SPAN 211 & 212 
Intermediate Spanish 


History & Social Sciences 


American Government 


3 


62 


POLS 202 American 
National Government 


Educational Psychology, 
Intro 


3 


55 


Elective 


History of the United 
States 1: Early 
Colonization to 1877 


3 


57 


Elective (policy effective 
2005-2006) 


History of the United 
States II: 1865 to the 
Present 


3 


53 


Elective (policy effective 
2005-2006) 


Human Growth & 
Development 


3 


60 


PSYC 252 Developmental 
Psych 


Macroeconomics, 
Principles of 


3 




Not accepted for credit 


Microeconomics, 
Principles of 


3 




Not accepted for credit 


Psychology, Introductory 


3 


60 


PSYC 250 General 
Psychology 


Social Sciences & History 


6 


60 


Elective 


Sociology, Introductory 


3 


60 


SOCL 201 Introduction to 
Sociology 


Western Civilization 1: 
Ancient Near East to 
1648 


3 


57 


HUMN 10 IS Humanities 

OR 

lower-division history 

credit 



56 HUMN201(3hrs) 

Humanities combined 
with CLEP Humanities OR 
Lower-division history 
credit 



Business 



IB Exam 


Score 


Courses and Credits 


Biology 2003 


5 


BIOL 112, 4 hrs 




6,7 


BIOL 111 and 112, 8 hrs 


Business and 
Management 2002 


6 


BADM 210, 3 hrs 


Chemistry 2003 


5.6,7 


CHEM 170. 4 hrs (in majors not 
requiring organic chemistry) 




5 


CHEM 170, 4 hrs (in majors requiring 
organic chemistry) 




6,7 


CHEM 170 and 171, 8 hrs 


Classical Languages 2003 


HL5orSL 
6,7 


General elective, 6 hrs 


Classical Languages 2003 


HL6. 7 or 
SL7 


General elective, 6 hrs 


Computer Science 2000 


6 


General elective, 3 hrs 


Creativity, Action, Service 
2003 




Not offered 


Design Technology 2003 


6,7 


General elective, 3 hrs 


Economics 1999 


6 


ECON 201,3 hrs 


Economics 2003 


6 


General elective, 3 hrs 


Film 2005 


6,7 


General elective, 3 hrs 


Further Mathematics 
Standard level 2001 


5.6,7 


MATH 213. MATH 211, 7 (11) hrs 
(MATH 212 with approval) 


Geography 2003 


5,6 


GEOG 201, 3 hrs 


History 2003 


5,6 


General elective. 3 hrs 


Islamic History 2003 


5,6 


HIST 206, 3 hrs 


IT in a Global Society HL- 
2006 SL-2004 


6 


CIS 201, 3 hrs 


Language A 1 2001 
(English: world lit) 


HL5. 6, 7 
orSL6, 7 


HUMN 101S. 3 hrs 


Language A2 1999 
(French, Germ, Span) 


HL5orSL 
6 


Elementary year. 6 hrs 


Language A2 2004 




Same as for 1999 


Language A2 1999 
(French, Germ, Span) 


HL6, 7 or 
SL7 


Elementary & Intermediate. 12 hrs 


Language ab initio 2004 
(No HL SL distinction) 


6 


French, Germ, or Span 111, 3 hrs 


Language ab initio 2004 
(No HLSL distinction) 


7 


French, Germ, or Span 111-112. 6 hrs 


Language B 1997 


HL5orSL 
6 


French, Germ, or Span 111, 3 hrs 




HL6, 7 or 
SL7 


French, Germ, or Span 111-112, 6 hrs 


Language B 2004 




Same as for 1997 


Mathematics Higher Level 
2001 


5,6,7 


MATH 213, MATH 211, 7 hrs 


Mathematical Methods 
Standard Level 2001 


6,7 


MATH 213, MATH 211. 6 (10) hrs 
(MATH 212 with approval) 


Mathematics Higher Level 
2006 


5,6,7 


MATH 213, MATH 211, 7 hrs 


Music 2002 


6,7 


General elective, 3 hrs 


Philosophy 2002 


HL5, 6, 7 
orSL6, 7 


General elective, 3 hrs 


Physics 2003 


4 


PHYS 203, 4 hrs 




5.6.7 


PHYS 203, PHYS 204, 8 hrs 


Social and Cultural 
Anthropology 2002 


5,6 


SOCL 210, 3 hrs 


The Extended Essay 1999 
(No HL SL distinction) 


6,7 


HUMN 101W, 3 hrs 


Theatre Arts 2001 


6,7 


General elective, 3 hrs 


Theory of Knowledge 
2001 




Not offered 



Visual Arts 2002 



6,7 



General elective, 3 hrs 



The following exams are nol accepted for credit: 

Accounting, Principles of Management, Principles of Marketing, Business Law, 

Introductory Information Systems & Computer Applications, Principles of Precalculus 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



academic policies 33 



Testing Services 

(Students in Degree Completion Programs) 

1 . At least one term of work must be completed at Milligan 
College before credit earned by testing will be recorded on the 
transcript. 

2. No credit by exam will be allowed after a student has finished 
two terms in the Milligan College degree completion program 
with respect to CLEP and DANTES credit. 

3. A maximum of 32 semester hours can be earned by testing. 

4. A recording fee of $10.00 per hour will be charged. 



Testing Services 



(Graduate Students) 

The Miller Analogies Test (MAT) is administered on an individual basis 
for those entering graduate studies. The MAT may be scheduled 
through the Testing Office. 

Graduate students may receive credit through CLEP testing to meet 
prerequisite program requirements or teacher licensure content area 
requirements providing that the academic adviser approves the granting 
of credit. Milligan College graduate students may submit scores on 
examinations taken through the CLEP program to the registrar for 
evaluation. College credit will be granted on the basis of an acceptable 
score earned through these testing programs as determined by the 
Academic Committee rather than by the testing company. See the 
undergraduate CLEP table for information about CLEP tests, 
acceptable scores, and credits awarded. 

Guidelines 

1 . Credit earned through CLEP testing will count as post- 
baccalaureate credit. 

2. A recording fee of $10.00 per hour will be charged. 

3. Credit may not duplicate previously earned college credit. 



Transfer Credit Policy 



For transfer courses, only the credit hours are posted to the student's 
transcript. No grades are recorded for the transferred credit. Quality 
points for transfer credits are not included in the Milligan College grade 
point average. Milligan College does not accept any transfer credit for 
courses at other institutions for which a grade below a C- was earned. 
The minimum number of credit hours earned at Milligan toward a 
bachelor's degree shall be 45. 

After matriculation, for undergraduate students in traditional programs, 
no transfer credit will be allowed for: Freshman and Sophomore 
Humanities (HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202); Christ and Culture (BIBL 
471); Old and New Testament Survey (BIBL 123, 124). 

Milligan College will award transfer credit, subject to approval of the 
Registrar's Office, for a maximum of 16 semester hours of dual 
enrollment credit (college or university credit earned concurrently with 
high school enrollment). Additional (non-dual enrollment) college 
credits may be earned prior to enrollment at Milligan College with the 
approval of the registrar. 

The transfer of credits after matriculation requires advance advising and 
approval. A matriculated student may receive credit from another 
institution only if appropriate signatures are secured before taking the 
course. "Appropriate signatures" are defined as the signature of any one 
of the three registrars and, if deemed necessary by the registrar, the 
signature of the student's adviser or area chair. 

A student transferring from another college must be in residence during 
the three semesters (may include one eight-week summer session) 
immediately preceding graduation and must successfully complete not 



fewer than 45 of the 128 required semester hours through instruction at 
Milligan College. A minimum of one-third of the hours within a major 
must be earned at Milligan College to receive a degree from Milligan. 

Students enrolled concurrently at another institution must count the 
number of hours with the hours at Milligan College in determining a full 
load for the semester. 



Transcripts 



Official transcripts of the student's academic record in Milligan College 
are furnished only upon the request of the student. Requests must be 
addressed to the Registrar's Office and must be signed by the student. A 
one-time transcript fee is charged to all matriculating students. This is a 
lifetime fee for all transcripts. Transcripts are withheld if the student or 
alumnus has an unsettled obligation to the College. 

Withdrawal 

From College 

No student may withdraw from the College without the permission of 
the dean. Upon securing the consent of the dean, the student is 
expected to meet all obligations involving instructors, fellow students, 
deans, residence hall directors, the vice president for business, the vice 
president for finance, and the registrar. The withdrawal process begins 
and ends in the Office of the Vice President for Student Development; 
other college offices (dean, registrar, financial aid, student accounts) are 
notified of the student's withdrawal. 

Students who leave the College without ful fillin g these obligations 
receive "Fs" in all courses in which they are enrolled and forfeit any 
returnable fees which may have been paid to the College. 

Students withdrawing from the College during the first eleven weeks of 
the semester (or the equivalent of 11/15 of an academic term when the 
term length is other than 1 5 weeks) will receive a grade of "W" in all 
courses. Withdrawals from the College after the eleventh week will be 
recorded with "W" or "F" at the discretion of the instructor. A student 
who does not withdraw by the official procedure will receive an "F" for 
each course. 

The College may administratively withdraw a student who is not 
attending class or otherwise not demonstrating a serious academic 
effort. Administrative withdrawals during the first eleven weeks of the 
semester (or the equivalent of 11/15 of an academic term when the 
term length is other than 1 5 weeks) will receive a grade of "W" in all 
courses. Administrative withdrawals from the College after the eleventh 
week will be recorded with "W" or "F" at the discretion of the 
instructor. 

The College may dismiss a student for social infractions. Social 
dismissals during the first eleven weeks of the semester (or the 
equivalent ofll/15ofan academic term when the term length is other 
than 15 weeks) will receive a grade of "W" in all courses, unless failing 
grades are also a part of the penalty. Social dismissals after the eleventh 
week will be recorded with "W" or "F" at the discretion of the 
instructor. 

From a Class 

A student mav, with the approval of the instructor and the adviser, 
withdraw from a class through the eleventh week of classes (or the 
equivalent of 1 1 / 1 5 of an academic term when the term length is other 
than 1 5 weeks). Classes dropped are evaluated with the grade "W." 
Withdrawal from a class with a "W" after the eleventh week of classes 
requires the consent of the instructor, the adviser, and the dean and will 
only be considered in extenuating circumstances. The signed withdrawal 
form must be received in the Registrar's Office before the end of the 
last class day (not including final exam week) of the term. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



34 academic programs 



Academic Programs 

Milligan College offers students a Christian liberal arts education in a 
community of inquiry, responsibility, and caring. 

The term "liberal arts" often is used to refer to a body of knowledge, 
concentrated in the humanities. This subject matter is meant to educate 
a student broadly about the historical, philosophical, and literary basis 
of our modern society. At Milligan College, these subjects are always 
taught from a perspective of God's activity with humanity; thus, biblical 
studies are also a critical element. The College's strong core curriculum, 
with an interdisciplinary humanities program and Bible, certainly 
teaches the "liberal arts." 

But liberal arts is also a way of describing an education that seeks to 
prepare students to think, to inquire about the nature and meaning of 
the world, and to analyze information and ideas. A liberal arts education 
orients students toward the world in an open and constructive way, to 
lead and to serve. Learning from a liberal arts perspective prepares one 
for an ever-changing world. This approach to the libera] arts is our goal 
at Milligan College. 

In Milligan College's educational model, the student is expected to 
acquire a general education by following a rationally determined pattern 
of course requirements comprised of required and optional courses in 
the various major disciplines. Every baccalaureate degree-seeking 
student must fulfill the requirements of a faculty-approved major. The 
declaration of the major is made no earlier than the second semester of 
the freshman year. Except in the case of a few majors, students are not 
required to pursue another less extensive study in a discipline outside 
the major discipline, known as a minor. See the description for the 
major to determine if a minor discipline of study is required. 

Milligan College grants three baccalaureate degrees and three master's 
degrees: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing (B.S.N.), Master of Business Administration 
(M.B.A.), Master of Education (M.Ed.), and Master of Science in 
Occupational Therapy (M.S.O.T.). 



Baccalaureate Degrees 

A minimum of 128 semester hours is required for graduation with any 
baccalaureate degree. Students must be enrolled at Milligan College 
during the final two semesters immediately preceding graduation to 
receive a Milligan College degree. The Academic Dean may approve an 
exception in extraordinary cases. Students transferring from another 
college must successfully complete not fewer than 45 of the 128 
required semester hours through instruction at Milligan College. A 
minimum of one-third of the hours within a major must be earned at 
Milligan College. 

Students may earn a second baccalaureate degree distinct from the first 
in major and degree type and subsequent to the completion of the first 
degree by completing at least 30 semester hours in another major. 

Bachelor of Arts degree (B.A.) 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred in all fields in which the 
College offers a major, with the exception of nursing. Foreign language 
proficiency is required through the intermediate level. The specific 
degree requirements are found in the description of each major or 
program. 

Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred in the fields of applied 
finance and accounting, biology, business administration, chemistry, 
child and youth development, communications, computer information 
systems, human performance and exercise science, mathematics, 



psychology, and sociology. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree (B.S.N.) 

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program prepares students 
for professional nursing career opportunities and for graduate study. 
Upon satisfactory completion of the nursing program requirements, 
graduates of the program become eligible to sit for the NCLEX-RN 
licensure examination. 



Graduate Degrees 

Master of Business Administration degree (M.B.A.) 

The Master of Business Administration degree program prepares 
students for roles of leadership in business. Students' knowledge of the 
major functional areas within business is reinforced while a 
commitment to Christian values and ethical conduct prepares students 
to meet the challenges of a highly competitive business environment 
with integrity and character. 

The program consists of forty credit hours delivered over approximately 
eighteen months, divided into four semesters. Classes meet one 
weekend each month and are supported by extensive internet-based 
contact among the students and with faculty between the monthly class 
sessions. The program is cohort-based, incorporating periods of 
intensive class-time together with independent, distance-based work, 
and is well suited for mature, working students. 

Master of Education degree (M.Ed.) 

The Master of Education program includes both initial licensure and 
advanced degree options. These programs are designed for prospective 
teachers (initial licensure) and licensed teachers (advanced degree), and 
are available in several licensure fields including early childhood 
education (Pre-kindergarten-grade 3), elementary education 
(kindergarten-grade 6), middle grades (grades 4-8), secondary (grades 7- 
12), and several K-12 specialty areas. Initial licensure candidates in any 
of the above licensure fields may finish the program in two summers 
and one academic year (i.e. fifteen months). The advanced degree 
program consists of core courses plus electives available in fall, spring, 
and summer terms. Students in either of the programs mav choose to 
extend course work beyond the typical program completion period. 

The initial licensure program is designed for students who have a non- 
education baccalaureate degree with a strong general education 
component and one or more specialty or endorsement areas (or 
majors). This program consists of 45 to 47 semester hours. The 
advanced degree program is designed for licensed teachers who wish to 
enhance existing professional competencies or pursue additional 
licensure or both. This program is closely tied to the National Board for 
Professional Teaching Standards certification process. This program 
consists of 36 semester hours (a twenty-four credit core and twelve 
elective credits). 

Master of Science in 

Occupational Therapy degree (M.S.O.T.) 

The Master of Science in Occupational Therapy degree program is 
designed for students who have an earned bachelor's degree and who 
have completed the prerequisite requirements for admission to the 
program. Baccalaureate degrees can be in a variety of academic areas, 
some of which include human performance and exercise science, 
human development, sociology, biology, and psychology. 

The Master of Science in Occupational Therapy degree program 
promotes integration and utilization of theory and practice in the art 
and science of occupational therapy and prepares students to meet the 
entry-level standards of the American Occupational Therapy 
Association. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



academic programs 35 



General Education Requirements 

In order for students to meet the desired outcomes listed above, the 
following general education courses, in addition to courses in a major 
and, in some cases, a minor, are required for all Milligan College 
students: 

1. Old Testament Survey (BIBL 123), New Testament Survey 
(BIBL 124), and Christ and Culture (BIBL 471). (9 hrs total) 

2. Freshman Humanities (HUMN 101 and 102) and Sophomore 
Humanities (HUMN 201 and 202). (24 hrs total) 

Students must earn a C- or better in HUMN 101W 
(beginning fall semester 2003) in order to advance to HUMN 
202W and to meet the writing requirements for graduation. 
At the writing professor's discretion, students with more 
severe writing difficulties may be required also to complete 
successfully (i.e., pass with a C- or better) HUMN 093 when 
repeating HUMN 101W. 

Students must also pass HUMN 202W (D- or better) in order 
to complete the writing requirements for graduation. 

3. Introduction to College and Calling (PSYC 100). (1 hr total) 

4. Fitness for Life (HPXS 101) and one additional hour of 
activity (chosen from any other HPXS 100 level course). (2 
hrs total) 

5. Eight credit hours of laboratory science from biology, 
chemistry, physics, or kinesiology and biomechanics (HPXS 
352). OT 531 may count as a four-hour undergraduate 
laboratory science course. (8 hrs total) 

6. Six credit hours of social learning courses, to be selected from 
economics, geography, political science, psychology, 
sociology, or LS 304 Law and Globalization, LS 330 Family 
Law, LS 340 Juvenile Justice, or LS 355 Criminal Law and 
Procedure. 

7. Three credit hours of ethnic studies, to be chosen from the 
following courses: History of Fiction Film (COMM 371); 
African-American Narrative Literature (ENGL 362); Cultural 
and Ethnic Geography (GEOG 202); History of Islam (HIST 
206); History of the Jews Since 70 A.D. (HIST 208); Seminar 
on Vietnam (HIST 480); Japanese Literature (HUMN 285); 
Law and Globalization (LS 304); World Music (MUSC 250); 
Cross-Cultural Psychology (PSYC 356); Religions of the 
World (RELG/PHIL 350); Religion, Culture and Peoples of 
Africa (RELG/SOCL 440); Introduction to Cultural 
Anthropology (SOCL 210); Latin American Cultures (SOCL 
221); Race and Ethnic Relations (SOCL 314); Aspects of 
Intercultural Studies (SOCL 360); Civilization and Culture of 
Latin America (SPAN 402). (3 hrs total) 

Additional courses are included in this list as approved by the 
College. Students may also satisfy the ethnic studies 
requirement by successfully completing a semester abroad in 
one of the following programs: China Studies Program; Latin 
American Studies Program; Middle East Studies Program; 
Russian Studies Program; Uganda Studies Program. 

8. Speech Communication (COMM 102 or an acceptable 
substitute). (3 hrs total) 

9. Three credit hours of mathematics. (3 hrs total) 



10. For bachelor of arts students, foreign language competency 
through the intermediate level. (6-12 hrs total) 

Outcomes 

The core curriculum for baccalaureate degrees at Milligan College is 
designed to provide students with a broad foundation for life-long 
learning and for further study in specific disciplines. Toward that end, 
students who complete the core curriculum should show evidence of 
the following with regard to their knowledge, skills, and attitudes: 

■ the ability to read texts critically, to discern their 
presuppositions and implications, and to evaluate intelligently 
their effectiveness. 

■ the ability to recognize and appreciate different literary and 
artistic forms, to perceive how form and content are related, 
and to recognize the interconnections among academic 
disciplines. 

■ an abiding awareness of how the present is linked to the past 
through formative ideas and events of Western-and to a 
lesser degree of non-Western-civilizations. 

■ a broad and appreciative understanding of human beings and 
human life in global, local, and personal contexts. 

■ a knowledge of the content of the Bible, as well as an 
understanding of how historical, cultural, and social contexts 
affect the Bible's composition, reception, interpretation, and 
lived application. 

■ the ability to write effectively, utilizing the conventions of 
standard written English. 

■ the ability to undertake basic academic research, employing a 
variety of learning resources and technologies. 

■ the ability to recognize the factors that influence human 
communication and to demonstrate this understanding by 
researching, preparing and delivering a variety of effective 
public speeches. 

■ the ability to think logically and reason effectively, utilizing 
scientific and mathematical methodologies to solve problems. 

■ for bachelor of arts candidates, an intermediate proficiency in 
a modern language other than one's native language, or 
translation skill in an ancient language. 

■ the ability to perform a variety of physical activities, to 
incorporate those skills into a physically active lifestyle, and to 
understand and appreciate the benefits of that lifestyle. 



Computer Literacy Requirement 

Graduates of Milligan College degree programs must demonstrate 
competency in the basic use of computers, including basic operating 
system skills, word processing, e-mail, and library and research skills. 

First-time students must complete the computer literacy and library 
assignments in Psychology 1 00 with 65% accuracy. Students who do 
not complete the assignments with 65% accuracy must enroll in CIS 
275 Computer Applications before graduation. This course must be 
completed with 65% accuracy or the course must be repeated. 

Transfer students who have not completed a computer literacy course 
at another institution may complete the computer competency exam 
during new student orientation. Students will be informed of this option 
at the time their transcripts are evaluated. Students who do not 
complete the computer competency exam during new student 
orientation with 65% accuracy must enroll in and successfully complete 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



36 academic programs 



a course with a significant computer component approved by the 
Registrar's Office before graduation. 

Adult degree completion program (ADCP) students with a major in 
business administration must complete CIS 275B Computer 
Applications. This course must be completed with 65% accuracy or the 
course must be repeated. 

Adult degree completion program (ADCP) students with a major in 
child and youth development must satisfactorily complete EDUC 152B 
Technology in Education. 

Applicants to the Master of Business Administration program must 
have prior academic work in computers and/or computer applications 
or, alternatively, must demonstrate competency as determined by the 
M.B.A. admissions committee. Such competency may be determined by 
the nature of an applicant's work experience. Further, M.B.A. students 
complete individual assignments as well as group projects and 
presentations throughout the program that require extensive use of 
computer technology. The M.B.A. faculty evaluates these assignments, 
defining successful completion as an overall grade of 80%. Additionally, 
because of the extensive use of computer technology, including 
internet-based activities, successful completion of the degree program 
inherently requires a high level of computer literacy. 

Master of Education students will complete assignments in EDUC 511 
and EDUC 512 with 70% accuracy. Successful completion of EDUC 
511 and EDUC 512 are required for graduation. 

Master of Science in Occupational Therapy students are required to use 
computer technology to complete a research project. The research 
portion of the curriculum includes the courses OT 580, OT 680, OT 
685 and OT 780. M.S.O.T. students are required to provide 
computerized presentations in other core OT courses. Students must 
achieve a 3.0 grade point average for graduation. 



College Writing cannot withdraw from these courses. However, upon 
demonstrating the ability to do "A," "B," or "C" work consistently in 
humanities courses being taken at the same time, a student mav be 
excused at midterm by the instructor from completing either College 
Reading and Study Skills or Fundamental College Writing and receive 
credit for the course. Upon satisfactory performance on the math 
competency exam given at the beginning of the semester or upon 
instructor approval, a student may withdraw from Developmental Math. 

A minimal grade of "C-" is required to pass developmental studies 
courses. Failure to pass a developmental studies course requires that the 
student retake the course unless otherwise determined by the 
developmental studies professor. 

■ Mathematics - see MATH 090 

■ College Reading and Study Skills - see HUMN 091 

■ Fundamental College Writing - see HUMN 093 

These hours do not count toward the 128 hours required for a degree 
but are included in the student's GPA. 



Writing Competency 



Students who have earned a grade of C- or better in comparable 
composition courses at other institutions may be granted transfer credit 
equivalent to having satisfactorily completed HUMN 101W and/or 
HUMN 202W at Milligan College. However, the credit will be applied 
pending the student's demonstration of writing competency 7 on the 
writing sample required of new enrollees during new student 
orientation. The writing faculty may require a student with transfer 
credit in composition to take HUMN 101W and/or HUMN 093 if the 
student's writing sample indicates writing deficiencies. Students may 
discuss the writing faculty's assessment of their writing sample with the 
Director of Writing if they wish to appeal the faculty decision. 



Developmental Studies 

The developmental studies classes in mathematics, writing, and study 
skills give students the opportunity to develop more proficiency in these 
areas and increase their chances for success in college course work. 
Applicants with ACT scores of below 19 in math or with SAT 
numerical scores of 440 or below are required to take Developmental 
Math. Students with no ACT or SAT scores and with no college level 
(not developmental) math credit with a grade of C- or above must take 
a math competency test to assess their need for developmental math. 

Applicants with ACT scores of 20 or below in English or Reading or 
with SAT verbal scores of 490 or below are required to take College 
Reading and Study Skills their first semester. Such applicants with ACT 
scores of 1 9 or 20 in English and Reading or with SAT Verbal score of 
460-490 and a high school cumulative GPA of 3.5 or above are 
exempted from the requirement to register for College Reading and 
Study Skills. 

Applicants with ACT scores of 20 or below in English or SAT verbal 
scores of 490 or below will be preregistered for Fundamental College 
Writing during their first semester. Each student's placement in 
Fundamental College Writing will be confirmed or canceled after the 
writing staff has evaluated an essay written by the student during 
orientation. Transfer students, international students, and any students 
with no ACT or SAT scores aie evaluated for Fundamental College 
Writing on the basis of a writing sample completed during orientation. 

A student whose first semester performance in freshman humanities 
indicates a need for assistance may be placed in College Reading and 
Study Skills and/or Fundamental College Writing the following 
semester on the recommendation of the student's humanities section 
leader or writing instructor. 

Students placed in College Reading and Stud}' Skills and Fundamental 



Tutoring 



Students may sign up to work with a tutor — another student at Milligan 
who has been through a particular course successfully and now offers 
assistance to others in that course. Tutors are available for a variety of 
subjects, including but not limited to Bible and Humanities. Milligan 
provides tutoring services at no cost to the student. Contact the Office 
of Student Success at any time to sign up for tutoring services. 



Co-operative Programs 

Co-operative programs enable students to enjoy the advantages of other 
colleges or programs. Further information may be obtained by 
contacting the Registrar. 

East Tennessee State University and 
Emmanuel School of Religion 

Under certain circumstances and with prior approval, Milligan College 
students who wish to enroll in courses not available at Milligan College 
may do so at East Tennessee State University and Emmanuel School of 
Religion. Generally, courses available under the co-op program must be 
required for a major or an approved course of study and must not be 
available in Milligan's course schedule in a reasonable period of time. 
Prior approval is required. 

Courses taken under the co-op program are considered part of the 
Milligan program and will receive Milligan grades; the tuition for these 
courses is part of the Milligan tuition. 

Students will be responsible for providing their own transportation to 
and from the other institution. See the Assistant Registrar for details 
about this program. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



academic programs 37 



ROTC 

Milligan College students are eligible to participate in the Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps program through East Tennessee State 
University. Interested persons should contact the Office of the Registrar 
for further information. 



Off-Campus Programs 

Milligan College offers a number of formally linked off-campus 
programs (see listing below) and allows for participation in a wide 
variety of other accredited off-campus programs. Students studying on 
formally-linked programs are eligible for campus-based financial aid 
(scholarships and grants), with the following exceptions: 

(a) athletic scholarships may not be used for study-away 
programs 

(b) faculty/ staff grants are subject to the restrictions outlined in 
the faculty and administration personnel handbooks 

(c) institutional aid is available for one off-campus semester 
study experience only per person 

Students studying on other (not formally-linked) study-away programs 
will be treated as participating in other transfer programs and may only 
receive federal and state financial aid subject to the federal and state 
policies that govern such programs. In the case of non-formally-linked 
programs, students arrange their programs and courses of study by 
mutual consent, paying to their own institutions the published fees for 
participating in the program. 

For students studying away during fall or spring semesters, Milligan will 
charge a $500 study-away fee. 

Milligan may limit the number of students participating in formally- 
linked off-campus study programs (currendy at ten students) per 
academic year. 



Fall and Spring Semester Formally-Linked Programs 

PCCIS Semester in London 

This program offers students the opportunity to study for a semester 
through Milligan's agreement with International Enrichment, Inc. 
Classes are held on the campus of Imperial College of Science, 
Technology and Medicine, part of the University of London. Stateside 
faculty from consortium member institutions travel to London and 
teach courses in their specialties. All courses are designed to gain 
maximum benefit from the great treasures that London has to offer. 
Students are required to enroll in a core course, "British Life and 
Culture", comprised of weekly lectures by British academics or 
professionals and weekly field trips to places such as Stratford-upon- 
Avon, Stonehenge, Canterbury, Oxford, etc. Students earn 1 2 to 1 5 
semester hours of credit. 

Council for Christian Colleges & Universities 

The Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU), an 
association of 107 campuses in the United States and Canada, offers the 
following semester and summer programs to students of its member 
institutions. The programs offer a unique opportunity for students to 
make the world their classroom, going beyond the confines of the 
traditional classroom. These interdisciplinary learning opportunities are 
available to second-semester sophomores, juniors and seniors. For 
further information, contact the Office of the Vice President for 
Academic Affairs and Dean. 

American Studies Program (ASP) 

Founded in 1976, the American Studies Program has served hundreds 
of students as a "Washington, D.C. campus." ASP uses Washington as a 
stimulating educational laboratory where collegians gain hands-on 



experience with an internship in their chosen field. Internships are 
tailored to fit the student's talents and aspirations and are available in a 
wide range of fields. Participants also explore pressing national and 
international issues in public policy seminars that are issue-oriented, 
interdisciplinary, and led by ASP faculty and Washington professionals. 
The ASP bridges classroom and marketplace, combining biblical 
reflection, policy analysis, and real-world experience. Students are 
exposed to on-the-job learning that helps them build for their future 
and gain perspective on the calling of God for their lives. They are 
challenged in a rigorous course of study to discover for themselves the 
meaning of Christ's lordship in putting their beliefs into practice. The 
aim of the program is to help Council schools prepare their students to 
live faithfully in contemporary society as followers of Christ. Students 
earn 1 6 semester hours of credit. 

Australia Studies Centre (ASC) 

The ASC offers students a semester at the Wesley Institute in Sydney, 
Australia, where they can explore their artistic talents through Wesley 
Institute's outstanding division of Ministry & the Arts. Faculty trained 
and working in the professional performing arts scene in Sydney will 
guide students in their thinking through the Christian's role in culture, 
whether classical or pop culture. The ASC utilizes a combination of 
classroom training at the Wesley Institute and experiential learning in 
the beautiful Australian context. Home stays, service learning, and travel 
around Australia are important components of the ASC. Students will 
examine the many faces of Australia. They will observe its beautiful 
landscape, live in the cosmopolitan melting pot of Sydney, serve the 
poor of Sydney's multi-cultural ghettos, engage the political capital 
Canberra and its power players, and come to know the traditions of 
Aborigines. ASC students participate in the core experiential course and 
choose the remainder of their credits from Wesley Institute's arts and 
ministry courses. ASC students receive up to 16 hours of credit 

China Studies Program (CSP) 

The China Studies Program enables students to engage this ancient and 
intriguing country from the inside. While living and experiencing 
Chinese civilization firsthand, students participate in seminar courses on 
the historical, cultural, religious, geographic, and economic realities of 
this strategic and populous nation. In addition to the study of standard 
Chinese language, students will be given opportunities such as assisting 
Chinese students learning English or working in an orphanage, allowing 
for one-on-one interaction. Students choose between completing a 
broad Chinese study program concentration and a business 
concentration, including an internship in an international business in 
Shanghai. The program introduces students to the diversity of China, 
including Beijing, Shanghai, Xi'an, and Xiamen. This interdisciplinary, 
cross-cultural program enables students to deal with this increasingly 
important part of the world in an informed, Christ-centered way. 
Students earn 15-17 semester hours of credit. 

Contemporary Music Center (CMC) 

The Contemporary Music Center provides students the opportunity to 
live and work in community while seeking to understand how God will 
have them integrate music, faith, and business. Both interdisciplinary 
and multidisciplinary in nature, the CMC offers two tracts: the Artist 
Track and the Executive Track. The Artist Track is tailored to students 
considering careers as vocalists, musicians, songwriters, recording 
artists, performers, producers, and recording engineers. The Executive 
Track is designed for business, arts management, marketing, 
communications, and related majors interested in possible careers as 
artist managers, agents, record company executives, music publishers, 
concert promoters, and entertainment industry entrepreneurs. Both 
Artist and Executive track students receive instruction, experience, and 
a uniquely Christian perspective on creativity and the marketplace, while 
working together to create and market a recording of original music. 
Both tracks include course work, labs, directed study, and a practicum. 
Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



38 academic programs 



Latin American Studies Program (LASP) 

Students of CCCU colleges have the opportunity to live and learn in 
Latin America through the Latin American Studies Program, based in 
San Jose, Costa Rica. The program introduces students to a wide range 
of experiences through the study of the language, literature, culture, 
politics, history, economics, ecology, and religion of the region. Living 
with a Costa Rican family, students experience and become a part of the 
day-to-day lives of typical Latin Americans. Students also take part in a 
service opportunity and travel for three weeks to nearby Central 
American nations. Students participate in one of four concentrations: 
Latin American Studies (offered both fall and spring terms); Advanced 
Language and Literature (limited to Spanish majors and offered both 
fall and spring terms); International Business and Management (offered 
only in fall terms); and Tropical Sciences (offered only during spring 
terms). Students in all concentrations earn 16-18 semester hours of 
credit. 

Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC) 

The Los Angeles Film Studies Center is designed to train students of 
Council institutions to serve in various aspects of the film industry with 
both professional skill and Christian integrity. Students live, learn, and 
work in the LA area near major studios. The curriculum consists of two 
required seminars focusing on the role of film in culture and the 
relationship of faith to work in this very influential industry. In addition, 
students choose two elective courses from a variety of offerings in film 
studies. Internships in various segments of the film industry provide 
students with hands-on experience. The combination of the internship 
and seminars allows students to explore the film industry within a 
Christian context and from a liberal arts perspective. Students earn 16 
semester hours of credit. 

Middle East Studies Program (MESP) 

This program, based in Cairo, Egypt, allows Council students to explore 
and interact with the complex and strategic world of the modern Middle 
East. The interdisciplinary seminars give students the opportunity to 
explore the diverse religious, social, cultural, and political traditions of 
Middle Eastern people. Students also study the Arabic language and 
work as volunteers with various organizations in Cairo. Through travel 
to Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Syria, and Turkey, students are exposed to 
the diversity and dynamism of the region. At a time of tension and 
change in the Middle East Region, MESP encourages and equips 
students to relate to the Muslim world in an informed, constructive, and 
Christ-centered manner. Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. 



an Integrative Seminar and the course Christianity and Cultures. The 
SSO is designed for students interested in the fields of Classics, English 
& Literature, Theology & Religious Studies, Philosophy, and History, 
though all majors may apply. Applicants are generally honors and other 
very high-achieving students. Students earn 17 semester hours of credit. 

Uganda Studies Program (USP) 

Winston Churchill is credited with nicknaming Uganda the "Pearl of 
Africa," and many visitors since his time have come to agree with him. 
The USP offers students a very personal encounter with this African 
success story, which has become an economic and public health model 
in its region. Another success story, Uganda Christian University 
(UCU), serves as the base of study for students in the USP. Set on the 
outskirts of the capital city Kampala, this rapidly growing institution 
brings USP students together with the UCU Honours College. Courses 
taught by local faculty in the English tutorial tradition will immerse 
students in a uniquely African education. Topics such as Christianity 
and Islam in Contemporary Africa, African Literature, and African 
History will present many insights into African life because of the 
guidance of faculty who live in and love Uganda and East Africa. Home 
stays, travel, service learning, and daily interaction with Honours 
College students form the backbone of the USP experience. In addition 
to the core experiential course, students will choose from an approved 
selection of courses from the UCU Honours College to earn up to 1 6 
semester hours of credit. 

Washington Journalism Center (WJC) 

The Washington Journalism Center (WJC) is a semester-long studv 
program in Washington, DC created for students interested in the field 
of journalism. While in Washington students will take classes focusing 
on the history and future of the media and how it relates to the public 
as well as on their personal writing skills. These classes - Foundations 
for Media Involvement, Reporting in Washington, and Washington 
News and Public Discourse - combined with an internship at a top 
news publication will help students learn to integrate their faith in a 
journalism career. Students will also participate in service learning 
opportunities as well as live with families in home stays as part of the 
WJC experience. Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. 



Summer Off-Campus Programs 

Summer programs may not be eligible for financial aid depending upon 
the student's circumstances. 



Russian Studies Program (RSP) 

RSP students are exposed to the depth and diversity of the culture 
during a semester spent in Russia's three largest cities: Moscow, St. 
Petersburg, and Nizhnii Novgorod. In addition to three seminar courses 
entitled History and Sociology of Religion in Russia; Russian Peoples, 
Cultures, and Literature; and Russia in Transition, students receive 
instruction in the Russian language, choosing either four or six semester 
hours of language course work. For those choosing four hours of 
Russian, a seminar course, International Relations and Business in 
Russia, is available. RSP strives to give students as wide an experience as 
possible in this complex nation. Students spend time in Moscow, the 
heart of both medieval and modern Russia. Students also spend 12 
weeks in Nizhnii Novgorod, a strategic city on the Volga River. After 
six weeks of language instruction, students live with a Russian family for 
the remainder of their stay in this city. Students participate in a service 
opportunity in Nizhnii Novgorod. The program also includes time in 
the complex and intriguing city of St. Petersburg, the Russian "window 
to the West." Students earn 16 semester hours of credit. 

The Scholars' Semester in Oxford (SSO) 

SSO is designed for students interested in doing intensive scholarship in 
this historic seat of learning. Working with academic tutors, students 
hone their skills and delve into the areas that interest them most. As 
Visiting Students of Oxford University and members of Wycliffe Hall, 
students have the privilege to study and learn in one of the university's 
historic halls. SSO students enroll in a Primary and Secondary Tutorial, 



Humanities European Study Tour 

Milligan students may earn three hours of humanities credit by 
participating in a four-week tour of Europe offered each summer. One 
or more of Milligan's humanities professors will lead the tour, which 
normally visits ten European countries. Visits are made to sites of both 
historical and cultural significance. In addition to travel, students 
complete writing assignments and fulfill other responsibilities outlined 
by the tour professor. The tour (HUMN 200) may be taken in place of 
HUMN 202S. Prerequisites include HUMN 101 and HUMN 102. 

PCCIS Summer in London 

(Private College Consortium for International Studies) 
In the summer program, students have the choice of signing up for one, 
two, or three sessions of classes or Session One plus an Internship, for 
a total study abroad experience lasting anywhere from 25 to 88 days. 
Classes are held on the campus of Imperial College of Science, 
Technology and Medicine, part of the University of London. Stateside 
faculty from consortium member institutions travel to London and 
teach courses in their specialties. The "British Life and Culture" Lecture 
Series supplements each course and provides the students with a greater 
understanding of British history and civilization. Students earn 3 credit 
hours per session and 3-6 credit hours for the Internship. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



academic programs 39 



Oxford Summer Programme (OSP) 

The Oxford Summer Programme (OSP) is a program of the CCCU and 
Wycliffe Hall, Oxford. The program is designed for students wishing to 
gain a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between 
Christianity and the development of the West and who wish to do 
specialized work under expert Oxford academics in the areas of history, 
religious studies, political theory, philosophy, English, and history of 
science. The Programme is structured for rising college sophomores, 
juniors, seniors, graduate and seminary students, non-traditional 
students, teachers, and those enrolled in continuing-education 
programs. 

International Business Institute (IBI) 

Students pursuing a major in business administration may select an 
emphasis in international business by participating in a ten-week 
academic program abroad through Milligan's affiliation with the 
International Business Institute (endorsed by the CCCU). Completion 
of this emphasis requires the student to attend the Institute during a 
summer session following completion of the required core courses at 
Milligan College. A student's course of study can often be designed so 
that graduation is possible following seven semesters of study at 
Milligan College in addition to the summer Institute. Students pursuing 
the international business emphasis are strongly encouraged to 
demonstrate competency in a foreign language through, at least, the 
intermediate level. Participation in the IBI includes the following 
required courses: 

BADM 339 Global Marketing (3 hrs) 

BADM 390 Global Business Management and Strategy (3 hrs) 
ECON 331 Comparative Economic Systems (3 hrs) 
ECON 350 International Trade and Finance (3 hrs) 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



40 programs, majors, and minors 



Programs, majors 
and minors 





Major 


Minor 


BA. 


B.S. B.S.N. Grad 


Accounting 




X 








Applied Finance 
and Accounting 


X 




X 


X 




Art tsee Fine Arts) 


X 


X 


X 






Bible 


X 


X 








Bible/Ministry 


X 




X 






Biology 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Business 
Administration 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Chemistry 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Child and Youth 
Development 


X 




X 


X 




Children's Ministry 




X 








Christian Ministry 




X 








Coaching 




X 








Communications 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Computer 

Information 

Systems 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Economics 




X 








Education 










X 


English 


X 


X 


X 






Exercise Science 




X 








Film Studies 




X 








Fine Arts 


X 




X 






Fitness and 
Wellness 




X 








French 




X 








General Science 




X 








Greek 




X 








Health Care 
Administration 




X 








History 


X 


X 


X 






Human Perform. & 
Exer. Science 


X 




X 


X 




Humanities 


X 




X 






Journalism 




X 








Language Arts 


X 




X 






Legal Studies 




X 








Mathematics 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Missions 




X 








Music (General 
Music Studies) 


X 


X 


X 






Music Education 


X 




X 






Music 

(see Fine Arts) 


X 




X 






Nursing 


X 






: 


< 


Occupational 
Therapy 










X 


Philosophy 




X 








Photography 
(see Fine Arts) 


X 


X 


X 






Physical Education 




X 








Physical Science 




X 








Political Science 




X 








Psychology 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Public Leadership 
and Service 


X 




X 






Sociology 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Spanish 




X 








Theatre Arts 
(see Fine Arts) 


X 


X 


X 






Worship Leadership 


X 




X 






Worship Ministry 




X 









Majors 

As students progress toward the baccalaureate degree, they select a 
major from the following: Applied Finance and Accounting, Bible, 
Biology, Business Aclministration, Chemistry, Child and Youth 
Development, Communications, Computer Information Systems, 
English, Fine Arts, History, Human Performance and Exercise Science, 
Humanities, Language Arts, Mathematics, Music (General Music 
Studies), Music Education, Nursing, Psychology, Public Leadership and 
Service, Sociology, and Worship Leadership. Professional teaching 
licensure is available in several fields and at both baccalaureate and 
graduate levels. A student may declare as a major only those majors that 
are available at Milligan College or available through one of the 
established cooperative agreements. 



Minors 

Except in the case of a few majors, students are not required to select a 
minor. Fields of minor concentration vary from eighteen to twenty-four 
hours in the number of semester hours credit required. Hours counted 
toward a major may not be counted also toward a minor or a second 
major. 

Minors are available in Accounting, Art, Bible, Biology, Business 
Administration, Chemistry, Children's Ministry, Christian Ministry, 
Coaching, Communications, Computer Information Systems, 
Economics, English, Exercise Science, Film Studies, Fitness and 
Wellness, French, General Science, Greek, Health Care Administration, 
History, Journalism, Legal Studies, Mathematics, Missions, Music 
(General Music Studies), Philosophy, Photography, Physical Education, 
Physical Science, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Spanish, 
Theatre Arts, Worship Ministry, and Youth Ministry. 

A transfer student must take at least one-third of the hours in the major 
field of study at Milligan College. 



Youth Ministry 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



programs, majors, and minors 41 



Majors and Minors 
by Area 

BibMCal Learning (Philip D. Kenneson, Area Chair) 
Majors 

Bible with emphases in Children's Ministry, General Studies, Missions, 

Pastoral Ministry, Youth Ministry 
Worship Leadership 



Minors 

Bible 

Children's Ministry 
Christian Ministry 



Missions 

Worship Ministry 
Youth Ministry 



BllSineSS Oohn C. Keyt, Area Chair) 

Majors 

Applied Finance and Accounting 

Business Administration 

with emphases in Accounting, Economics, General, Health Care 
Administration, International Business, Legal Studies, Management, 
Marketing, Secondary Education Licensure, Sports Management 

Computer Information Systems 



Economics 

Health Care Administration 

Legal Studies 



Minors 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Master's 

Master of Business Administration 



EdUCatiOn (Lyn C. Howell, Area Chair) 

Majors 

Child and Youth Development 

Human Performance and Exercise Science 

with emphases in Exercise Science, Fitness and Wellness, 

Physical Education 



Minors 

Coaching 
Exercise Science 


Fitness and Wellness 
Physical Education 


Master's 

Master of Education 




Humane Learni 


Jng flack L. Knowles, Area Chair) 


Majors 

English 
Humanities 
Language Arts 




Minors 

English 
French 
Greek 


Philosophy 
Spanish 



Nursing (Melinda K. Collins, Area Chair and Director) 
Major 

Nursing 



OCCUPatiOnal TheraPV (Jeff Snodgrass, Area Chair 
and Director) 

Master's 

Master of Science in Occupational Therapy 

Performing, Visual, and 

COmmUniCatiVe ArtS (C. Richard Major, Area Chair) 
Majors 

Communications 

with emphases in Broadcasting, Digital Media Studies, Film 

Studies, Interpersonal and Public Communication, Journalism, 

Public Relations 
Fine Arts 

with emphases in Art, Music, Photography, Theatre 
Music (General Music Studies) 

with emphases in Applied Study and Jazz Studies 
Music Education 

with emphases in Vocal and Instrumental 



Minors 

Art 

Communications 
Film Studies 
Journalism 



Music (General Music Studies) 

Photography 

Theatre Arts 



SCientifiC Learning (Diane E. Junker, Area Chair) 
Majors 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 



Minors 

Biology 
Chemistry 
General Science 



Mathematics 
Physical Science 



SOCial Learning (Susan G. Higgins, Area Chair) 
Majors 

History 

Psychology 

Public Leadership and Service 

Sociology 

Minors 

History 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Sociology 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



42 accounting 



Accounting 



Area of Business 

Milligan College offers an applied finance and accounting major (B.A. 
or B.S. degree) and an accounting minor. These programs support the 
following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their 
ability to read and think analytically and critically, to 
communicate clearly and effectively, to evidence knowledge 
and competencies in the liberal arts and the social sciences, 
and to understand a significant body of material in their 
major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through 
stewardship of resources and preparation for graduate studies 
and a rewarding career or profession. 

Courses in finance, economics, and accounting are designed to prepare 
the student for careers in finance, public accounting, corporate and 
managerial accounting (controllership), and related enterprise and 
institutional management areas. Basic skills are learned and practiced 
and higher-level finance and accounting concepts and principles are 
acquired through problem-oriented courses in each of the discipline 
areas. The use of finance and accounting as managerial tools is 
emphasized. 

Graduates with a major in applied finance and accounting are expected 
to: (1) possess broad finance, accounting and business knowledge as 
well as mastery of the technical knowledge of finance and accounting in 
order to serve the organizations in which they work; (2) be well 
prepared to find ready employment in the field; (3) possess the ability to 
apply computer and information technology to solve real-world finance, 
accounting and business problems; (4) have acquired leadership and 
management skills that are necessary for the successful planning, 
implementation, and control of the business enterprise, all rooted in a 
foundation of ethical and moral principles. 

Students planning to become certified public accountants should be 
aware that many states have made substantial changes in their 
educational requirements for persons desiring a CPA Certificate. These 
requirements vary in their specific requirements from state to state but 
must be met before the applicant's first sitting for the Uniform CPA 
Examination. Students should check the exact requirements for the 
particular state in which they intend to seek certification. For example, 
the State of Tennessee requires a total of 150 semester hours, which is 
an additional 22 semester hours beyond the 128 needed for a bachelor's 
degree at Milligan College. Students intending to become certified 
public accountants are encouraged to consult with their advisers early in 
their college career. 



Applied Finance and Accounting 
major - B.A. or B.S. (33 hrs) 

In addition to specific courses required in the major, the student must 
complete MATH 213, which meets the math requirement in the general 
education requirements, and CIS 275. 

ACCT 21 1 and 212 Introductory Accounting I and II (6 hrs) 

ACCT 301 and 302 Intermediate Accounting I and II (6 hrs) 

ACCT 31 1 Cost Accounting (3 hrs) 

ACCT 412 Federal Income Taxation (3 hrs) 

ECON 201 Macroeconomic Principles and 202 Microeconomic 

Principles (6 hrs) 
ECON 301 Corporate Finance (3 hrs) 
ECON 401 Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance (3 hrs) 



ECON or ACCT electives at the 300 or 400 level (3 hrs) 
The B.A. requires a foreign language through the intermediate level. 

Accounting minor (24 hours) 

ECON 201 Macroeconomic Principles and 202 Microeconomic 

Principles (6 hrs) 
ACCT 211 and 212 Introductory Accounting I and II (6 hrs) 
ACCT 301 and 302 Intermediate Accounting I and II (6 hrs) 
ACCT electives at the 300 or 400 level (6 hrs) 

Business administration majors with an accounting minor are required 
to take 12 hours of business electives in place of ECON 201 and 202 
and ACCT 211 and 212. 



Course Descriptions 

ACCT 211. Introductory Accounting I - An introduction to the 
principles and the practice of accounting. Coverage is given to the 
fundamentals of recording, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting 
financial information in accordance with generally accepted accounting 
principles. Although all business entities are discussed, the primary 
focus is the accounting system of the sole proprietorship. Offered fall 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

ACCT 212. Introductory Accounting II - A continuation of the 
fundamentals of the principles of accounting. Coverage begins with 
partnerships and corporations and the accounting issues related to these 
entities. Attention is then given to the fundamentals of managerial 
accounting principles and systems, with an emphasis on recording, 
reporting, analysis, and decision-making. Prerequisite: ACCT 211. 
Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

ACCT 301. Intermediate Accounting I - An in-depth study of 
financial accounting topics as well as recent developments in accounting 
valuation and reporting practices. Detailed attention is provided to 
recording, reporting, and disclosure of financial information. Emphasis 
is primarily given to statements of income and retained earnings and the 
asset accounts of the balance sheet. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered 
fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

ACCT 302. Intermediate Accounting II - A continuation of the in- 
depth study of financial accounting topics. Emphasis is given to 
liabilities and stockholders equity accounts of the balance sheet and the 
statement of cash flows. Also covered are the topics of: earnings per 
share, investments, income taxes, pensions and other retirement 
benefits, leases, accounting changes, and error analysis. Prerequisite: 
ACCT 301. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

ACCT 311. Cost Accounting - A study of the use of accounting 
information for managerial decisions with emphasis on the role of the 
controller and the "Planning and Control" techniques used in modern 
industrial and commercial organizations. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. 
Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

ACCT 312. Auditing I - A study of the concepts and standards of 
independent auditing with an emphasis on the decision-making process. 
The overall audit plan and program is presented with regard to: 
professional ethical and legal responsibilities, audit and other attestation 
reports, planning and documentation, evidence, materiality, and internal 
control. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered fall term alternate years. 
Three semester hours. 

ACCT 313. Auditing II - A continuation of the study of the concepts 
and standards of independent auditing with a primary emphasis on the 
detailed application of the audit process to financial statement cycles. 
Attention is given to the types and application of audit tests needed for 
evidence gathering purposes and completion of the audit process. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



art 43 



Prerequisite: ACCT 312. Offered spring term alternate years. Three 
semester hours. 

ACCT 315. Not-For-Profit Accounting - A studv of accounting 
principles and techniques uniquely applicable to the public and not-for- 
profit sectors of economic organizations. This course includes the 
principles of "Fund Accounting" as well as controllership techniques 
utilized in managing not-for-profit and governmental institutions. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered spring term alternate years. Three 
semester hours. 

ACCT 411. Federal Income Taxation - A study of the U.S. income 
taxation and return preparation of individuals. This course focuses on 
the concepts of inclusions and exclusions of gross income, exemptions, 
personal and business deductions, losses, and cost recovery as they are 
applied to individuals. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered fall term 
alternate years. Three semester hours. 

ACCT 412. Federal Income Taxation - A study of the U.S. income 
taxation of corporations, partnerships, trusts, and estates as well as the 
U.S. estate and gift taxation. Emphasis is given to the tax consequences 
of the formation and operation of those entities. Prerequisite: ACCT 
411. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

ACCT 415. Advanced Accounting: Theory - A continuation of the 
study of the principles of accounting with emphasis on the more 
complex accounting environment. This includes such areas as business 
combinations, bankruptcies and other liquidations, intercompany 
transactions, segment reporting and accounting, and reporting for the 
Securities and Exchange Commission. Prerequisite: ACCT 302. Offered 
fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

ACCT 416. Advanced Accounting: Problems - A study to prepare 
the student to handle complex accounting problems of the type that 
frequendy appear on the CPA exam. While the course is primarily 
oriented to the student planning to go into public accounting, it also has 
substantial value for the student interested in large company 
controllership. Prerequisite: ACCT 415. Three semester hours. 

ACCT 491. Internship - A practicum experience, which involves the 
student in a supervised position in business for the dual purpose of 
learning about accounting and possible occupational choices. 
Prerequisite: consent of major professor. Offered every term. One to 
six semester hours. 

ACCT 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Not offered every year. One to three 
semester hours. 



Art 



Area of Performing, Visual, and Communicative Arts 

Fine Arts major - B.A. (38 hrs) 

Art emphasis 

Milligan College offers a fine arts major with an art emphasis. For 
further information on the fine arts major, refer to the information 
under the listing for fine arts major. 



Art minor (18 hrs) 

The art minor fits well with numerous majors, including but not limited 
to Bible, business administration, communications, humanities, and 
psychology. The study of art may serve to foster students' avocational 
interests as well as to prepare them for more concentrated an studies in 
the future. 

Three hours from HUMN 101, 102, 201, and 202 (or an equivalent 

approved bv the registrar) 

ART 250 Drawing I (3 hrs) 

ART 251 Painting I (3 hrs) 

ART 367 Art History (3 hrs) 

Studio art or photography courses (6 hrs) 



Course Descriptions 

ART 110. Design Fundamentals - An introductory course designed to 
strengthen visual problem-solving, color awareness, use of value, and 
composition skills. Students will work in a variety of media (2D and 3D) 
on a series of projects that promote the above-mentioned skills, in the 
context of studying key works of art by artists of historical significance. 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

ART 120. Fine Arts Colloquium - An introductory course featuring 
lectures, discussions, guest speakers, and field trips to area museums, 
galleries, and theatres through which fine arts students will gain an 
appreciation of the many resources in the immediate geographical area. 
While enrollment is open to any student, this course is required for all 
fine arts majors in their first fall term as a fine arts major. Offered fall 
term each year. One semester hour. 

ART 237. Basic Photography - An introduction to the 35mm camera 
and basic darkroom procedures. Students develop confidence in 
picture-taking and picture-printing procedures. Offered even,' term. 
Three semester hours. 

ART 250. Drawing I - A drawing fundamentals class that is a 
requirement for the fine arts major (an emphasis) but is also appropriate 
for non-art majors. Emphases include contour, gesture, and light and 
shade techniques as well as media drawing. Subject matter includes the 
human figure, landscape, and still life as well as drawing from the 
imagination. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

ART 251. Painting I - A course at the beginning level for fine arts (art) 
majors and non-art majors. Emphases include color mixing, paint 
application techniques, knowledge of materials, and historical and 
contemporary approaches. Subject matter and projects vary from figure 
and still life to abstraction of non-figurative assignments. Offered spring 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

ART 252. Watercolor Workshop - A study in watercolor methods, 
concepts, and approaches related to the medium of watercolor, its 
practice, and its history. The course is designed so those students with 
litde or no experience should feel comfortable alongside students who 
already possess some skills and understanding of the medium. Offered 
fall term even years. Three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



44 art 



ART 253. Introduction to Ceramics - An introductory course in the 
art/craft of ceramics. The emphasis is on hand-built ceramics with the 
added potential for students to gain some knowledge of wheel-thrown 
techniques. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours. 

ART 310. Intermediate Photography - An opportunity for students 
to expand their understanding of techniques and ideas presented in 
Basic Photography. Emphasis is placed on personal interpretation and 
visual communication. Prerequisite: ART 237. Offered every term. 
Three semester hours. 

ART 312. Introduction to Color Photography - An introduction to 
basic color materials and skills. Students learn color-printing processes. 
Aesthetics and technique are integrated throughout the course in hands- 
on printing sessions, critiques of student work, and lectures on color 
photography. Cross listed as COMM 312. Prerequisites: ART 237 and 
310. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

ART 337. Photojournalism - An examination of photographic visual 
principles to help students see the photograph as a medium of 
communication. Prerequisite: ART 237. Offered spring term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

ART 350. Drawing II - A course that builds on skills developed in 
Drawing I. Composition and creative problem solving are stressed 
within the context of assignments that allow students to explore 
multiple approaches to a few select themes. Color drawing media are 
also emphasized. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours. 

ART 351. Painting II - A course designed to allow students who have 
developed a basic understanding of color and painting techniques from 
Painting I to focus on a more personal direction in terms of content and 
choice of media as agreed on between student and instructor. Offered 
spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

ART 367. Art History - An in-depth study of nineteenth and twentieth 
century art. This course alternates between a European and an 
American emphasis depending on the semester/year in which it is 
offered. Topics include painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, 
and cross-discipline arts. Offered fall term even years. Three semester 
hours. 

ART 400. Field Studies in Fine Arts - A study tour to a selected city 
in the United States for the purpose of studying various aspects of the 
fine arts, notably art, photography, and theatre. A tour leader arranges 
visits to galleries and theatres. Specific reading assignments are 
completed before the trip, and a written project is submitted after the 
trip. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour. 

ART 411. Printmalting Studio - A course designed to allow students 
to explore relief printmaking (woodcut, linocut) as well as a limited 
number of intaglio techniques. Offered spring term even years. Three 
semester hours. 



ART 431. Sculpture Studio - An introductory course in three- 
dimensional problem-solving. Students work in a variety of materials as 
a means of understanding basic approaches to sculptural design through 
projects that range from the human figure to non-figurative forms. 
Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours. 

ART 437. Advanced Black and White/Color - An advanced 
approach to black and white and/or color printing techniques. 
Emphasis is placed on establishing a persona] style and creating a strong 
body of work. The student explores further the medium of photography 
through the use of small, medium, and/or large format cameras. 
Various photographers are studied, and several critiques are held 
throughout the semester. Prerequisites: ART 237, 310, and 312. Offered 
as needed. Three semester hours. 

ART 441. Fine Arts Methods - A study of art, music, and storytelling 
strategies and techniques useful to the teacher of children, birth through 
early adolescence. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the 
professional level of the teacher education program. Offered spring 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

ART 453. Digital Imaging - An introduction to the basic design tools 
of Adobe Photoshop followed by the exploration of the depths of pixel 
based image manipulation and ending with a more advanced study of 
the world renowned industry standard software package. The course 
covers photo restoration, surreal image creation, web page/interface 
design and optimization, and artistic expression through digital media. 
Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

ART 466. History of Photography - An overview of the history of 
photography from its beginning to present day. Slide lectures and class 
discussions examine the work of major photographers through the 
framework of historical, cultural, and social trends. Offered spring term 
each year. Three semester hours. 

ART 490. Directed Studies - Independent work for the junior or 
senior art or photography student in an area of the student's interest. 
The program is under the supervision of an art or photography 
professor. Offered every term. One to three semester hours. 

ART 494. Senior Exhibition - A course designed to allow graduating 
seniors an opportunity to present an exhibition of their artwork. The 
course also allows additional directed study and individualized 
instruction. Required of all students with a fine arts major and an 
emphasis in art or photography. The program is under the supervision 
of an art or photography professor. Offered every term. Three semester 
hours. 

ART 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Not offered every year. One to three 
semester hours. 



ART 421. The Arts, Faith, and Culture - A practical exploration, 
investigation, and discussion of what it means to be an artist and a 
Christian in an ever changing world. In addition to fine arts faculty, a 
selected number of guest lecturers will present insights into how the 
fine arts can be used in creative expressions of worship as well as 
exploring the many challenges of being an artist and a Christian in 
today's society. Portfolio review, interviewing techniques, and a fine arts 
community service project are also components of the course. This is 
the senior fine arts major capstone course. Offered spring term every 
year. Three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



Bible 45 



Bible 



Area of Biblical Learning 

Study of the Bible has been foundational to Milligan College since its 
inception. As the mission statement of the College indicates, Bible 
stands at the core of the "Christian worldview" that shapes all else 
about the College. The first two values affirmed in the mission 
statement ("A Positive, Personal Christian Faith That Jesus is Lord and 
Savior" and "A Commitment to Follow the Teachings of the Christian 
Scripture in One's Personal and Social Ethics") can only find reality in 
sincere study of the Bible. And because such study is demanding and 
stimulating, students enhance "The Capacity to Recognize and Assume 
Responsibility in Society" and appreciate "The Knowledge, Meaning, 
and Application of Sound Scholarship" in the Bible major. However, 
Milligan College believes this serious study of scripture should always be 
connected with service (or "ministry"), and so each track in the Bible 
major is focused toward teaching, ministering, or serving others in some 
way. 

The Bible major aims partly to prepare people for leadership ministry in 
the church, in this and other cultures, or to equip the student otherwise 
to understand and teach the content and meaning of scripture. The 
provision of specific "tracks" within the major recognizes the desire and 
need for specialization in focus for future service. Ministry of any 
emphasis or deeper academic study both need biblical and historical 
content, so the same core of essential courses is required for each track 
within the major. Specialization for particular ministry then is provided 
through the requirements of those tracks and through choices for 
related electives. A wide diversity of options in the ministerial and 
scholarly fields can be pursued with this major. Those seeking graduate 
education with the possibility of teaching Bible or religion courses will 
find the general studies track most helpful, and those pursuing a 
ministry track will also find themselves well prepared for seminary 
study. Over the years Milligan graduates have been well prepared to 
serve ably in various fields of ministry and/or pursue further study. 

Milligan College expects those who graduate with Bible majors to: (1) 
be prepared for service in a church, whether in a professional leadership 
role or as a scholar and teacher of scripture; (2) be able, especially those 
in ministry tracks, to prepare and preach sermons or teach lessons that 
have solid scriptural content, and those in the general studies track be 
able to help others "righdy divide the word of truth"; (3) have a good 
foundation in biblical, church historical, and either practical or scholarly 
studies for lifelong learning; (4) be equipped to pursue seminary or 
graduate education with a good preparation for that advanced study; (5) 
provide a good Christian example as a student of scripture. Emphases 
of spiritual dependence upon God, solid academic study-including 
serious study of the Bible itself-and practices of both integrity and 
effectiveness highlight a Bible major from Milligan 



Bible major - B.A. (37-39 hrs) 

The Bible major at Milligan — requiring 37 to 39 hours — leads to the 
B.A. degree, which requires intermediate proficiency in a foreign 
language. Language proficiency satisfies a general education requirement 
for students completing a B.A. degree. The Bible faculty strongly 
recommends this language be Greek (or Hebrew, when available) for 
the best study of the Bible. [Note: those pursuing the General Studies 
track are required to take a biblical language to satisfy the general 
education requirement.] Anyone considering a major or minor in Bible 
is advised to take BIBL 123 and 124 immediately after enrolling. 

The Bible major consists of several components, two of which are the 
same in all of the tracks: (1) a Bible core, and (2) a church history core. 
In addition each of the ministry-focused tracks (i.e.. Children's Ministry, 
Missions, Pastoral Ministry, or Youth Ministry) have (3) a Christian 
ministry core, and (4) courses specific to each track. 



Required core courses 

Bible (12 hrs) 

BIBL 201 Jesus in the Gospels (3 hrs) 

BIBL 21 1 Old Testament Images of God (3 hrs) 

3 hrs of Old Testament from BIBL 301, 304, 351, 352, 405, or 432 

3 hrs of New Testament from BIBL 202, 321, 322, 325, 411, 412, 

or 452 
BIBL 295 (Seminar), 489 (Directed Readings), and 495 (Seminar) 

may be suitable Old or New Testament electives, depending 

on course content. 

Church History (12 hrs) 

HIST 341 and 342 Church History (6 hrs) 
HIST 431 Reformation of the Nineteenth Century (3 hrs) 
3 hrs of electives chosen from HIST/BIBL 323, HIST/BIBL 343, 
HIST 250, 352, 432, 495 (The Radical Reformation) 

Christian Ministry (7-8 hrs) 

All of the Ministry-focused tracks (Children's, Missions, Pastoral, 

and Youth) include: 
CMJN 250, 251, 252, 253 Practical Ministries Colloquium A - D 

(2 hrs) 
CMTN 273 Introduction to Ministry (3 hrs) 
CMIN 491 Practicum in Ministry (2 hrs) OR 
CMTN 491 Practicum in Missions (3 hrs) 

Ministry tracks 

The fourth component of the Bible major in the Ministry tracks consists 
of those courses specific to each ministry track. 

Children's Ministry (7 hrs) 

CMTN 217 Foundation for Youth and Children's Ministry (3 hrs) 

CMTN 261 Introduction to Christian Education (2 hrs) 

CMIN 317 Materials and Methods of Children's Ministries (2 hrs) 

Missions (6 hrs) 

CMIN 270 Introduction to Christian Missions (3 hrs) 

One additional course from the following: 

ART 421 The Arts, Faith, and Culture (3 hrs) 

CMTN 265 Effective Christian Evangelism (2 hrs) (Note: If CMIN 

265 is selected, a third hour must be taken as CMIN 490 

Directed Studies) 
CMIN 271 History of Christian Missions (3 hrs) 
CMIN 430 Servanthood in the Third Millennium (3 hrs) 
CMIN 470 Current Issues in World Mission (3 hrs) 
HIST 206 History of Islam (3 hrs) 
HIST 208 History of the Jews Since 70 A.D. (3 hrs) 
BIBL/HIST 343 History of Biblical Interpretation (3 hrs) 
HIST 450 The Holocaust (3 hrs) 
MUSC 250 World Music (3 hrs) 

A strength of the missions emphasis is its interdisciplinary 
structure. Because effective ministry entails an understanding of 
human nature, the missions emphasis incorporates a solid 
foundation in the social sciences. To accomplish this, the missions 
emphasis requires an accompanying modified minor in sociology 
comprised of the following: 

SOCL 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs) 

Fifteen additional hours of sociology selected from: 

SOCL 303 Family (3 hrs) 

SOCL 314 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 hrs) 

SOCL 360 Aspects of Intercultural Studies (3 hrs) 

SOCL 421 Sociology of Religion (3 hrs) 

SOCL 451 Sociological Theory (3 hrs) 

SOCL 461 Dynamics of Cultural Change (3 hrs) 

Other approved Bible and sociology electives 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



46 Bible 



The modified minor is available only to students pursuing the 
missions emphasis track of the Bible major. 

Pastoral Ministry (6 - 8 hrs) 

CMIN 276 Homiletics (2 hrs) 

At least two courses from the following: 

CMIN 261 Introduction to Christian Education (2 hrs) 

CMIN 265 Effective Christian Evangelism (2 hrs) 

CMIN 365 Christian Worship (3 his) 

CMIN 375 Narrative and Story-Telling (2 hrs) 

CMIN 430 Servanthood in the Third Millennium (3 hrs) 

PSYC 357 Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Counseling 

(3 hrs) 
Seminars (BIBL 295 and 495) may be suitable pastoral ministry 

electives, depending on course content. 

Youth Ministry (7 hrs) 

CMIN 217 Foundation for Youth and Children's Ministry (3 hrs) 
CMIN 261 Introduction to Christian Education (2 hrs) 
CMIN 318 Materials and Methods of Youth Ministries (2 hrs) 

General Studies track (15 hrs) 

The General Studies track is designed for those who desire a more 
concentrated focus in Bible, church history, or theology. A general 
education requirement for this track is intermediate level 
proficiency in either Greek or Hebrew. This track retains two of 
the basic components of the Bible major — the Bible core and 
Church History core. The remaining 1 5 hours consist of a Senior 
Project (BIBL 490) and 12 additional hours selected from the 
following electives: 

ART 421 The Arts, Faith, and Culture (3 hrs) 

BIBL/HIST 323 Christian Thought in the Greco-Roman World 

(3 hrs) 
BIBL/HIST 343 History of Biblical Interpretation (3 hrs) 
BIBL/HUMN 380 Jesus in the Arts (3 hrs) 
BIBL — (any Bible content electives) 
CMIN/HIST 271 History of Christian Missions (3 hrs) 
CMIN 365 Christian Worship (3 hrs) 

CMIN/RELG 430 Servanthood in the Third Millennium (3 hrs) 
COMM 495 Art of Persuasion (3 hrs) 
ENGL 364 The Fiction of C.S. Lewis (3 hrs) 
ENGL 450 Literary Criticism (3 hrs) 
GREE/HEBR (elective classes in biblical languages, beyond the 

G.E.R.) 
HIST 206 History of Islam (3 hrs) 
HIST 208 History of the Jews since A.D. 70 (3 hrs) 
HIST 250 Christ,' Hider, and Women (3 hrs) 
HIST 352 Reformation of the Sixteenth Century (3 hrs) 
MUSC 453 Music and Worship (3 hrs) 
PHIL 321 Ethics (3 hrs) 

PHIL/RELG 350 Religions of the World (3 hrs) 
RELG 351 Philosophy of Religion (3 hrs) 
RELG/SOCL 421 Sociology of Religion (3 hrs) 
SOCL 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs) 
Other courses approved by the area chair 

In addition to these, a General Studies capstone course is required, 

either: 

BIBL 490 Senior Project (3 hrs) or 

BIBL 491 Practicum in Bible (3 hrs) 



Bible minor (18 hrs) 

The Bible minor at Milligan College is intended to be strictly a study of 
scripture. It consists of six specific courses, equally divided between Old 
Testament and New Testament, and it includes the basic survey classes 
(Bible 123 and 124). 

BIBL 123 Old Testament Survey and 124 New Testament Survey 

(6 hrs) 
BIBL 21 1 Old Testament Images of God (3 hrs) 
3 additional hrs of Old Testament courses 
6 additional hrs of New Testament courses 



Course Descriptions 



BIBL 123. Old Testament Survey - An examination of the Old 
Testament, its content, background, and significance. Required of all 
students. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 124. New Testament Survey - A study of the New Testament, 
including a survey of its Jewish and Hellenistic backgrounds. Required 
of all students. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 201. Jesus in the Gospels - A study of the Gospels with the 
intent of showing their distinctive insights into the person and work of 
Christ. Required for the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered 
fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 202. Acts - An analysis of the history, theology, and nature of the 
early church as seen in the Book of Acts. Satisfies the New Testament 
elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered spring term 
each year. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 211. Old Testament Images of God - An introduction to the 
character and actions of the Lord God of Israel as seen through the Old 
Testament. Required for the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. 
Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 252. Biblical Archaeology - A study of the history and 
techniques of archaeology in the biblical world as a historical science 
together with a survey of Palestinian history as reconstructed by the 
latest archaeological evidence. The uses of archaeological data for 
biblical studies are emphasized. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in 
the Bible major. Offered periodically. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Three 
semester hours. 

BIBL 275. Selected Topics in the History of the Reformation of 
the Nineteenth Century - An examination of the Stone-Campbell 
heritage including both primary and secondary readings intended to 
help students understand the church tradition (the "Restoration 
Movement") that is linked to the history of Milligan College. Students 
may not apply this course to a major in Bible or history. Same as HIST 
275. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Offered 
periodically. One semester hour. 

BIBL 295. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from year to year. 
Offered periodically. One to three semester hours. 

BIBL 301. The Prophets - Exegetical studies in the books of the latter 
prophets. Attention will be given to the character and message of each 
prophet and book as seen against their social, political, and historical 
backgrounds. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the Bible major. 
Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 



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Bible 47 



BIBL 304. Old Testament History - Exegerical studies in the 
historiographical books of the Old Testament. Attention is given to the 
theological perspectives and historiographical methods that guided the 
composition of these books. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the 
Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered periodically. Three 
semester hours. 

BIBL 321. Prison Epistles - An exegerical study of Ephesians, 
Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon. Satisfies the New Testament 
elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. 
Three semester hours. 

BIBL 322. Pastoral Epistles - An exegerical study of 1 and 2 Timothy 
and Titus. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. 
Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 323. Christian Thought in the Greco-Roman World - A 

course of readings in various representatives of the Christian tradition 
from the second through the fifth century, including Origen, Tertullian, 
Cyprian, Athanasius, Ambrose, and Augustine in their historical 
contexts. Special attention is given to the contributions of these thinkers 
to the development of the Christian tradition. Same as HIST 323. 
Prerequisites: HUMN 101, 102, 201, and 202, or consent of the 
instructor. Satisfies the church history elective in the Bible major. 
Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 324. Johannine Literature - A study of the contents and themes 
of the Johannine Episdes and the Gospel of John. Satisfies the New 
Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered 
periodically. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 325. Apocalyptic Literature - A study of the Book of 
Revelation and other eschatological and apocalyptic passages in the 
context of Jewish apocalypticism. Satisfies the New Testament elective 
in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. Three 
semester hours. 

BIBL 343. History of Biblical Interpretation - A survey of the 
history of hermeneutics and exegesis in the Christian tradition from the 
ancient through the modern periods. The course examines the various 
principles and methods adopted by theologians in their attempts to 
explain the meaning of the biblical text. Same as HIST 343. 
Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124, HUMN 101, 102, 201, and 202, or 
consent of the instructor. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the 
Bible major. Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 351. The Pentateuch - Exegerical studies in the Pentateuch. 
Attention is given to major theological concepts and narrative artistry. 
Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: 
BIBL 123. Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 352. Old Testament Devotional and Wisdom Literature - 

Exegerical studies in the devotional and wisdom literature of the Old 
Testament. Attention is given to the theological, philosophical, and 
worship-related themes of these books. Satisfies the Old Testament 
elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered periodically. 
Three semester hours. 



BIBL 405. The Old Testament in the Church - An historical survey 
of the reception of the Old Testament as Christian scripture and 
challenges thereto. The study is based, as much as possible, on readings 
of primary texts from all periods of church history. Prerequisites: BIBL 
123 and HUMN 201 and 202, or consent of the instructor. Satisfies the 
Old Testament elective in the Bible major. Offered periodically. Three 
semester hours. 

BIBL 411. 1 and II Corinthians - An historical, exegerical, and 
thematic study of I and II Corinthians. Satisfies the New Testament 
elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodicallv. 
Three semester hours. 

BIBL 412. Romans and Galatians - An historical, exegerical, and 
thematic study of Romans and Galatians. Satisfies the New Testament 
elective in the Bible major. Offered periodically. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. 
Three semester hours. 

BIBL 422. Intertestamental Literature - A survey of the types of 
Jewish literature (e.g., apocryphal, pseudepigraphic, wisdom, 
apocalyptic) and their contents which were influential in the 
development of Judaism in the last two centuries BC and in the first 
century AD. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered periodicallv. Three 
semester hours. 

BIBL 452. General Epistles - A study of the contents and themes of 
non-Pauline letters, especially Hebrews, James, and 1 Peter. Satisfies the 
New Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. 
Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 471. Christ and Culture - An examination of how contemporary 
Western cultures shape how Christians understand and embodv their 
faith, and an exploration of how Christians might respond to these 
challenges. Required of all seniors. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. 
Offered every semester. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 473. Spirituality in Everyday Life - An historical, theological, 
and practical exploration of how life in the Spirit may be nurtured and 
sustained in the midst of everyday life. Prerequisite: junior or senior 
status. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings 
that provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. One to three semester hours. 

BIBL 490. Senior Project - An individualized course of study (major 
paper or other appropriate project) to be determined by the student and 
a faculty committee. This course serves as the culminating project for 
the General Studies track of the Bible major. Three semester hours. 

BIBL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas 
beyond regular course offerings. Topics van' from semester to semester. 
Offered periodically. One to three semester hours. 



BIBL 380. Jesus in the Arts - An exploration of the creative images of 
Jesus throughout the centuries, drawing examples from the literary, 
dramatic, visual, musical, kinetic, and cinematic arts, seeking a deeper 
appreciation for the arts in the life of the church and for the impact of 
the image of Jesus in people's lives. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered 
periodically. Three semester hours. 



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48 biology 



Biology 

Area of Scientific Learning 

The biology major supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their 
ability to read and think analytically and critically, to 
communicate clearly and effectively, to evidence knowledge 
and competencies in the liberal arts and the natural and social 
sciences, and to understand a significant body of material in 
their major field of study. 



Pre-requirements for professional and paramedical programs and 
graduate school vary depending on the program and institution. 
Students must check the pre-requirements for entrance exams and 
admission to the programs they are interested in applying to and, with 
the help of their science adviser, adjust their course of study so that the 
institution's pre-requirements are met. It is strongly recommended that 
students meet with a science adviser to plan their course of study so 
that they sequence courses to complete the major in a timely and fitting 
way. 

Eleven hours of the general education requirements (8 lab science hours 
and 3 math hours) are fulfilled in the biology major. 



■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through 
awareness of health issues, appreciation for the arts and 
sciences, stewardship of resources, and preparation for 
graduate studies and a rewarding career or profession. 

The biology curriculum is designed for the student planning a career in 
the biomedical sciences, education, research, and governmental services. 

Graduates with a major in biology are expected to (1) demonstrate 
proficiency in a broad spectrum of life science disciplines; (2) 
demonstrate familiarity with information in chemistry; (3) be capable of 
critical thinking; (4) demonstrate skill in clearly communicating scientific 
information in the following: verbal format, written format, and 
computer-based technology. 

No more than four hours credit in either BIOL 200 or 490 or a 
combined total of six hours in the three courses may be applied toward 
the requirements for a major in biology. Credit in 200 or 490 may not 
be applied toward a minor in biology. 



Biology major - B.A. (24 hrs) 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is designed for students interested in 
biology but desiring a broad choice of electives not in the sciences. 

8 hours from the following: BIOL 110 General Biology; BIOL 
111 and BIOL 1 12 Principles of Biology 

BIOL 202 Botany (4 hrs) 

BIOL electives (12 hrs) (4 hours must be at the 300 level or 
higher) 

Other required courses (11-12 hrs): 

CHEM 170 General Chemistry I AND 151 Introduction to 

Organic and Biochemistry or 171 General Chemistry II 

(8 hrs) 
MATH 211 PreCalculus/Calculus I (4 hrs) OR 213 Statistics 

(3 hrs) 
Foreign language through the intermediate level is required 



Biology major - B.S. (32 hrs) 

8 hours from the following: BIOL 110 General Biology; BIOL 

111 and BIOL 1 1 2 Principles of Biology 
BIOL 202 Botany (4 hrs) 
BIOL electives (20 hrs) (12 hours must be at the 300 level or 

higher) 

Other required courses (11-12 hrs): 

CHEM 170 General Chemistry I AND 151 Introduction to 

Organic and Biochemistry or 171 General Chemistry II 

(8 hrs) 
MATH 21 1 PreCalculus/Calculus I (4 hrs) OR 213 Statistics 

(3 hrs) 



Biology minor (20 hrs) 



8 hours from the following: BIOL 110 General Biology; BIOL 
111 and BIOL 112 Principles of Biology 
BIOL 202 Botany (4 hrs) 
BIOL electives (8 hrs) 



Course Descriptions 

BIOL 110. General Biology - An introductory course that examines 
fundamental biological concepts of plants and animals with particular 
relevance to man's place in the living world. Offered fall and spring 
term each year. Four semester hours. 

BIOL 111-112. Principles of Biology - A two-semester course which 
introduces and integrates the principles of biology including the 
chemistry of life, cells, genetics, evolution, biological diversity, biology 
of plants, biology of animals, and ecology. The course is designed to 
stimulate critical thinking. Offered as a year sequence beginning with 
the fall term each year. Four hours each semester. 

BIOL 121. Environmental Science - An introductory course which 
examines the interactions of humans with the planet earth. Dynamics 
surveyed include ecosystems, population biology, biodiversity, food 
production, geological resources, climate, pollution, and energy 
resources. Offered fall term each year. Three hours lecture and one two- 
hour lab weekly. Four semester hours. 

BIOL 200. Field Studies in Biology - An analysis of selected 
biological problems and/or in-depth study of unique ecosystems. 
Subject content varies according to selected topics. The course is 
conducted at an off-campus location, and the student may incur 
additional expenses for travel. A student may not accumulate more than 
four hours credit in this course. This course should not be used to 
satisfy college degree requirements in science except by permission of 
the science faculty chairman. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 or consent of 
instructors. Offered in the spring intersession each year. One to four 
semester hours. 

BIOL 202. Botany - An intensive survey of plants, algae, and fungi. 
Prerequisite: four hours of biology. Offered spring term each year. Four 
semester hours. 

BIOL 250-251. Anatomy and Physiology - A two-semester course 
designed to study the structure and function of the organ systems of 
humans. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 or 111 or consent of the instructor. 
Offered as a year sequence beginning with the fall term each year. Four 
hours each semester. 

BIOL 280. Introductory Microbiology and Immunology for the 
Health Sciences - An introductory course in the study of microbial 
organisms with particular emphasis on relationship to health, disease, 
and host defense mechanisms. A minimalized, hands-on lab component 
supplements lectures and discussions. This course may not be taken to 
fulfill the laboratory science requirement in the GER. This course does 
not count toward the biology major or minor. Offered spring term each 



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biology 49 



year. Three semester hours. 

BIOL 310. Genetics - A study of fundamental principles of heredity 
with related statistics and probability. Prerequisite: eight hours of 
biology. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours. 

BIOL 330. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy - A comparative study 
of the anatomic and phylogenetic development of the principal systems 
of selected classes of vertebrates. Prerequisites: BIOL 111-112 or 
consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Four semester 
hours. 

BIOL 340. Animal Physiology - A studv of the function and structure 
of the organ system of vertebrates in general but with emphasis on 
mammals. Prerequisite: BIOL 330 or consent of the instructor. Offered 
spring term each year. Four semester hours. 

BIOL 341. Animal Histology - A study of the microscopic anatomy 
of the various types of tissues and organs found in vertebrates. 
Prerequisite: eight hours of biology. Offered fall term alternate years. 
Four semester hours. 

BIOL 342. Vertebrate Embryology - A study of the general principles 
of vertebrate development from the formation of gametes to the 
formation of tissues and organs. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 
Offered as needed. Four semester hours. 

BIOL 350. Teaching Science to K-6 Students - A course focusing 
upon the understanding of scientific principles and the teaching of 
science to K-6 students. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and PHYS 104 or the 
equivalent and admission to the teacher education program. Field 
experience included. Offered spring term each year. Two semester 
hours. 

BIOL 360. Ecology - A study of the relation between organisms and 
their environment, factors affecting plant and animal structures, 
behavior and distribution, energy and material cycles, and populations. 
Prerequisite: four hours of biology. Offered fall term each year. Four 
semester hours. 

BIOL 362. Vertebrate Field Biology - A survey of the native 
vertebrate animals with emphasis on collection, preservation, 
identification, and taxonomic relationships. Prerequisite: four hours of 
biology. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours. 



BIOL 430. Advanced Anatomy - A regional study of human anatomy 
with a majority of the class hours spent in cadaver dissection. Regions 
and emphasis may vary according to the needs of the students and 
availability of materials. Prerequisites: BIOL 250 and 251 or BIOL 330 
or consent of the instructor. Offered as needed. One to four semester 
hours. 

BIOL 440. Endocrinology - A study of the structure and function of 
the endocrine glands with emphasis on their control and integration of 
biological processes. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered as 
needed. Four semester hours. 

BIOL 450. Cell and Molecular Biology - A study of the structure and 
function of various organelles of the eukaryotic cell with an emphasis 
on gene structure, gene expression and its regulation, and modern 
molecular methodology. Taken concurrendy with BIOL 451. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 310. Offered spring term each vear. Three 
semester hours. 

BIOL 451. Research Seminar - A seminar designed to introduce 
science majors to principles, politics, and methodology used in scientific 
research. A research paper and seminar emphasizing cell and molecular 
biology are required. Prerequisite: major or minor in biology; student 
must be registered concurrendy in BIOL 450 Cell and Molecular 
Biology. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour. 

BIOL 460. Neuroanatomy - A presentation of functional human 
neuroanatomy including related pathology. The course includes the 
study of the human nervous system specimens in a laboratory setting. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered spring term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

BIOL 490. Research Problem - Research on special problems in 
biology under direct supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: 
twenty hours of biology courses and consent of the biology faculty 
member to direct the research problem. Offering to be announced. One 
to four semester hours. 

BIOL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Not offered every year. One to three 
semester hours. 



BIOL 380. Microbiology and Immunology - A basic course in the 
study of microbiology including the preparation of media, sterilization, 
the isolation of micro-organisms and their identification, culture, and 
staining. Topics covered in immunology will include definitions and 
relationships of antigens and antibodies, host-antigen interaction, bursal 
and thymic influences on lymphoid cells, and humoral and cellular 
response mechanisms. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered 
fall term each year. Four semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



50 business administration 



Business 
Administration 

Area of Business 

The business administration major supports the following goals of 
Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their 
ability to read and think analytically and critically, to 
communicate clearly and effectively, to evidence knowledge 
and competencies in the liberal arts and the social sciences, 
and to understand a significant body of material in their 
major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through 
stewardship of resources and preparation for graduate studies 
and a rewarding career or profession. 

The core courses in business administration provide students with the 
broad base of knowledge and level of technical competence necessary 
to succeed in a business setting. Core courses in management, 
marketing, business law, and ethics expose students to the fundamental 
principles of business administration while providing the preparation 
necessary to continue study in upper level courses. The main purpose of 
the courses in economics is to develop in the student the ability to 
analyze and understand economic principles and institutions from an 
historical as well as a contemporary point of view. These courses 
furnish the theoretical background necessary for the achievement of a 
particular vocational or professional goal. Core courses in accounting 
provide students the requisite knowledge for understanding the financial 
aspects of the business enterprise. All core courses, as well as those 
within each emphasis, constitute the academic basis for graduate study 
in business and related fields. 

Graduates with a major in business administration are expected to: 
(1) Demonstrate knowledge of the business core that is sufficient to 
provide each student with a comprehensive understanding of the 
discipline's major functional areas. Likewise, students will possess the 
understanding necessary to successfully integrate the functional areas 
into a cohesive whole for the purpose of short and long-term decision- 
making. This body of knowledge will be sufficient for success in the 
workplace or in continued graduate studies; (2) Demonstrate knowledge 
in one or more areas of emphasis, providing students with the deeper 
understanding required for solving complex business problems 
including those faced under conditions of uncertainty; (3) Demonstrate 
knowledge of written and oral communication skills as well as the use of 
computer technology and mathematics sufficient to support the 
application of quantitative principles; and (4) Exhibit the development 
of the leadership and management skills that are necessary for the 
successful planning, implementation, and control of the business 
enterprise, all rooted in a foundation of ethical and moral principles. 

The major allows the student to complete a strong core curriculum in 
business, accounting, and economics and to choose from one of eight 
emphases, allowing for in-depth study in a specific field. Students 
majoring in business administration with an accounting emphasis may 
not minor in accounting. Students majoring in business administration 
with an economics emphasis may not minor in economics. Students 
majoring in business administration with a health care administration 
emphasis may not minor in health care administration. Students 
majoring in business administration with a legal studies emphasis may 
not minor in legal studies. 



Business Administration major - 
B.A. or B.S. (36-45 hrs) 

Required core courses (30 hrs) 

ACCT 21 1 and 212 Introductory Accounting I and II (6 hrs) 

BADM 315 Marketing (3 hrs) 

BADM 321 Business Law I (3 hrs) 

BADM 361 Principles of Management (3 hrs) 

BADM 421 Business Ethics (3 hrs) 

BADM 470 Business Strategy (3 hrs) 

ECON 201 Macroeconomic Principles and 202 Microeconomic 

Principles (6 hrs) 
ECON 301 Corporate Finance (3 hrs) 

The B.A. requires completion of a foreign language through the 
intermediate level. 

Students must complete a math course at the 200 level or above, 
determined in conjunction with their adviser, to fulfill the general 
education math requirement. Completion of ECON 201 and 202 fulfills 
the social learning requirement in the general education requirements. 
Students must demonstrate fulfillment of the College's computer 
competency requirement by successful completion of CIS 275 or by 
examination. 

Emphases 

The following emphases are available within the business administration 
major. In addition to successful completion of the general core 
requirements, students are required to complete additional courses 
within each emphasis as described below. 

Accounting (9 hrs) 

The accounting emphasis enables business students to deepen 
their understanding of accounting concepts as they relate to the 
business organization. This emphasis is recommended for students 
anticipating business careers requiring accounting knowledge at an 
advanced level, yet short of requiring an accounting major. 
Required courses within the accounting emphasis: 

ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting I (3 hrs) 
ACCT 302 Intermediate Accounting II (3 hrs) 
ACCT 31 1 Cost Accounting (3 hrs) 

Economics (9 hrs) 

The economics emphasis provides students with a deeper 
exposure to economic principles and institutions from an historical 
and modern perspective. The emphasis is recommended as an 
alternative for students interested in careers in banking, finance, or 
economics. Required courses within the economics emphasis: 

ECON 401 Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance (3 hrs) 

ECON 403 Money and Banking (3 hrs) 

ECON 460 History of Economic Thought (3 hrs) 

General (9 hrs) 

The general emphasis allows students to select any nine hours of 
course work from economics, business administration, or 
accounting. This emphasis is generally intended for those selecting 
business administration as a second major and is available with 
adviser permission only. 



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business administration 51 



Health Care Administration (15 hrs) 

The health care administration emphasis is intended to prepare the 
student for an administrative career in the health care industry. In 
addition to required course work, students selecting this emphasis 
must complete six hours of internship credit by on-site, supervised 
work at a hospital, long-term care, or other medical facility. 
Required courses within the health care administration emphasis: 

BADM 380 Intro to Health Care Administration (3 hrs) 
BADM 480 Long-Term Care Administration (3 hrs) 
BADM 481 Policies and Issues in Health Care (3 hrs) 
BADM 491 Internship (6 hrs) 

International Business (12 hrs) 

Students may select an emphasis in international business by 
participating in a ten-week academic program abroad through 
Milligan's affiliation with the International Business Institute 
(endorsed by the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities). 
Completion of this emphasis requires the student to attend the 
Institute during a summer session following completion of the 
required core courses at Milligan College. A student's course of 
study can often be designed so that graduation is possible 
following seven semesters of study at Milligan College in addition 
to the summer Institute. Students pursuing the international 
business emphasis are strongly encouraged to demonstrate 
competency in a foreign language through, at least, the 
intermediate level. Participation in the IBI includes the following 
required courses: 

BADM 339 Global Marketing (3 hrs) 

BADM 390 Global Business Management and Strategy 

(3 hrs) 
ECON 331 Comparative Economic Systems (3 hrs) 
ECON 350 International Trade and Finance (3 hrs) 

Legal Studies (9 hrs) 

The legal studies emphasis is designed to provide business 
administration majors a deeper understanding and exposure to 
legal issues affecting business. The emphasis is recommended for 
any business administration student who anticipates a business 
career requiring a legal background. Required courses for 
completion of the legal studies emphasis: 

ACCT 411 or 412 Federal Income Taxation (3 hrs) 
BADM 322 Business Law II (3 hrs) 
LS 304 Law and Globalization (3 hrs) 

Management (9 hrs) 

The management emphasis consists of courses designed to prepare 
students for successful careers in business and organizational 
management or administration. Required courses for completion 
of the management emphasis: 

BADM 362 Human Resource Management (3 hrs) 
BADM 365 Operations Management (3 hrs) 
BADM 364 or 375 Organizational Theory and Behavior or 
Small Business Management (3 hrs) 

Marketing (9 hrs) 

Students wishing to pursue careers in marketing, sales, or 
advertising should select the marketing emphasis. Required courses 
for completion of the marketing emphasis: 

BADM 304 Advertising (3 hrs) 

BADM 316 Cases in Marketing (3 hrs) 

Public relations elective from communications (3 hrs) 



Secondary Education Licensure (6 hrs)* 

The secondary education licensure emphasis consists of six hours 
of additional courses, preparing students to teach business on the 
secondary level (grades 7 - 12): 

BADM 210 Survey of Business (3 hrs) 
CIS 275 Computer Applications (3 hrs) 

*See additional education requirements in the Secondary 
Education section of the catalog (32 hrs). For a listing of the 
general education requirements for secondary education, please see 
the listing in the Education section of the catalog. To add an 
endorsement in business technology, the student must also 
complete the following courses: 

CIS 297 Visual Basic Programming (3 hrs) 

CIS 318 Web Theory (3 hrs) 

CIS 341 Systems Analysis and Design (3 hrs) 

Sports Management (12 hrs) 

The sports management emphasis consists of courses designed to 
prepare students for successful careers in the growing field of 
sports management. Required courses for completion of the sports 
management emphasis: 

HPXS 380 Sports Promotion, Finance, and Marketing (3 hrs) 
HPXS 381 Sports Facilities and Management (3 hrs) 
HPXS 404 Organization and Management of Physical 

Education and Sports (3 hrs) 
HPXS 491 Field Work (3 hrs) 



Business Administration minor 
(21 hrs) 

ACCT 21 1 Introductory Accounting I (3 hrs) 

BADM 315 Marketing (3 hrs) 

BADM 361 Principles of Management (3 hrs) 

ECON 201 Macroeconomic Principles or 202 Microeconomic 

Principles (3 hrs) 
CIS 275 Computer Applications (3 hrs) 
Accounting, business administration, or economics electives at the 

junior and senior level (6 hrs) 

Applied Finance and Accounting majors with a business adrninistration 
or economics minor are required to take business, accounting, or 
economics electives in place of ECON 201 or 202 and/or ACCT 211. 



Course Descriptions 

BADM 210. Survey of Business - This course provides students with 
an overview of business. It covers major topics such as management, 
marketing, economics/finance, accounting, and information technology. 
It also explores the role business plays within todav's social framework. 
This course is open to non-business majors, students who are 
undecided, or business majors exploring different areas of emphasis. 
(May not be taken as an upper level division business elective.) Offered 
fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

BADM 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the 
student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an 
individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. 
Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours. 

BADM 304. Advertising - A study of the principles of advertising 
along with its function and aims in business. Attention is given to the 
economic and psychological principles involved. There is also a study of 
market analysis and its importance to the field of advertising. The 
mechanics of lavout, media, and copy writing are considered. Offered 
spring term alternating years. Three semester hours. 



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52 business administration 



BADM 315. Marketing - A survey of marketing planning, buyer 
behavior, product strategy, distribution strategy, promotional strategy, 
and pricing strategy from a global perspective. Prerequisite: ECON 202. 
Offered every semester. Three semester hours. 

BADM 316. Cases in Marketing - A study of the application of 
marketing principles to individual organizations through the use of case 
studies. Prerequisite: BADM 315. Offered spring term alternating years. 
Three semester hours. 

BADM 321. Business Law I - A study of the legal system with an 
introduction to legal concepts in the areas of the American court 
system, criminal law, torts, strict liability, intellectual property, contracts, 
agency and business organizations. Emphasis is placed upon the 
application of these legal principles to commercial transactions. Offered 
fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

BADM 322. Business Law II - A study of the Uniform Commercial 
Code with an introduction to the legal concepts in the areas of sales, 
negotiable instruments, and secured transactions. Additional topics 
include bankruptcy, insurance, and property law. Emphasis is placed 
upon the application of these legal principles to commercial 
transactions. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

BADM 339. Global Marketing - A focus on the theory and practice 
of contemporary global marketing management. The context or 
environment of international marketing is covered along with the task 
of marketing in a variety of national domestic markets with their distinct 
cultural settings. The course is divided into three major areas: overview 
of the global marketing environment, moving into international 
markets, and advanced international marketing management. Classroom 
instruction is complemented by case studies and projects. Offered 
summer term each year as part of IB I program. Three semester hours. 

BADM 361. Principles of Management - A study of the basic 
principles of management. Also considered are decision-making and the 
fundamental function of management, planning, organizing, actuating, 
controlling, and applying the process of management to selected areas. 
Studies of individual firms are discussed. Offered ever)* semester. Three 
semester hours. 

BADM 362. Human Resource Management - A study of the 
principles and policies governing employer-employee relationships and 
a consideration of the problems and practices of hiring, supervising, and 
terminating workers. Prerequisite: BADM 361 or permission of the 
instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

BADM 364. Organizational Theory and Behavior - A course 
designed to describe organizational behavior theories and concepts in 
the context of current and emerging workplace realities. The course 
focuses on how knowledge management, self-leadership, network 
alliances, technology, and virtual teams are changing the way 
organizations are structured and operate in the 21st Century. Offered 
fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

BADM 365. Operations Management - A course designed to provide 
the student with a broad conceptual framework for the management of 
operations in today's competitive, global environment. This course 
emphasizes the strategic importance of operations decisions and how all 
functions within an organization interrelate. Specific attention is placed 
on developing a competitive operations strategy, decision-making, 
TQM, process management, and the use of technology to create new 
products and improve processes. Using case analysis and simulations, 
students develop a deeper understanding of realistic business issues and 
learn to apply the concepts presented in the text. Prerequisites: BADM 
361 and ECON 201. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

BADM 370. Personal Finance - An overview of personal and family 
financial planning with an emphasis on financial record keeping, 
planning spending, tax planning, consumer credit, making buying 



decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement 
and estate planning. Offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

BADM 375. Small Business Management - A study of the concepts 

and theories that will help the student create, manage, and gain profit 
from a small business. A computer simulation in which the students start 
and run their own small businesses is an integral part of the course. 
Prerequisite: BADM Administration 361 . Offered spring term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

BADM 380. Introduction to Health Care Administration - An 

introduction to various aspects of health care administration, including an 
overview of the health care deliver) 7 system in the United States and the 
various components and services within the health care industry. Guest 
lecturers from various health care agencies provide students with 
information about their professions. Offered fall term alternate years. 
Three semester hours. 

BADM 385. Professional and Personal Development - A course 
designed to provide the student with an understanding of effective 
professional and personal behavior in an organization. The course 
focuses on understanding the behavior of workers and managers in an 
organizational environment, developing effective communication styles, 
working in a team environment, handling power and politics in an 
organization, understanding change, conflict and creativity, and 
developing and reaching personal goals. Using personal assessments, 
skill building exercises, and case analysis, students build the 
interpersonal skills required for successful interaction within the 
business environment. Offered fall term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

BADM 390. Global Business Management and Strategy - A course 
designed to cover the major topics normally offered in a course in 
international business management and strategy as well as more in- 
depth coverage of such areas as international corporate finance, human 
resource management, and strategy. It also has a very important 
function of enabling the integration of field experiences, corporate 
visits, and presentations by guest faculty with the current theoretical 
developments and literature in this field. Offered summer term each 
year as part of IBI program. Three semester hours. 

BADM 421. Business Ethics - A study of theoretical and practical 
problems of moral conduct in the field of business. The course 
emphasizes both the philosophical foundations of ethical conduct and 
the practical problems encountered in the day-to-day conduct of 
business affairs. Much of the study of practical problems centers around 
actual case studies. Although there are no specific prerequisites, this 
course should generally be taken only after a number of other business 
administration courses have been completed. Offered every semester. 
Three semester hours. 

BADM 470. Business Strategy - An integrated study of the functional 
areas of finance, marketing, and management with emphasis on case 
analysis, readings, and computer simulations. Prerequisites: BADM 315 
and 361 and ECON 301. Offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

BADM 480. Long-Term Care Administration - A study of the 
principles and applications of long-term care administration, including 
general management, environmental management, patient care, 
personnel management, and government regulations. Offered spring 
term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

BADM 481. Policies and Issues in Health Care - A focus on the 
application of analytical skills of policy formation in the health 
professions. The course focuses on analyzing the processes in the 
design, adoption, implementation, and evaluation of current health 
policy. Recent political and ethical issues relating to health care policy 
are examined. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester 
hours. 



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business administration (MBA) 53 



BADM 491. Internship - A practicum experience which involves the 
student in a position in business under adequate supervision for the 
joint purposes of learning about business and possible occupational 
choices. Prerequisite: consent of major professor. One to six semester 
hours. 

BADM 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. One to three semester hours. 



Business: 

Master of Business 

Administration (MBA) 

Area of Business 

The Master of Business Administration program is designed to prepare 
students for roles of leadership in business. Students' knowledge of the 
major functional areas within business is reinforced while a 
commitment to Christian values and ethical conduct prepares students 
to meet the challenges of a highly competitive business environment 
with integrity and character. The program is a cohort-based, 40-credit 
hour degree delivered over approximately 1 8 months, divided into four 
semesters. Classes meet approximately one weekend each month and 
continue via extensive Internet-based contact with fellow students and 
with faculty in the period between class sessions. The combination of 
weekend class meetings and distance-based components is well suited 
for mature, working students. The Graduate Admissions Specialist or 
the MBA Program Manager should be contacted for current schedules 
and cohort start dates. 

The Master of Business Administration program supports the following 
goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their 
ability to read and think analytically and critically, to 
communicate clearly and effectively, to evidence knowledge 
and competencies in the liberal arts and the social sciences, 
and to understand a significant body of material in their 
major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through 
stewardship of resources and preparation for graduate studies 
and a rewarding career or profession. 



The following outcomes are expected to have been achieved upon 
completion of the curriculum and have been developed in support of 
the College's overall mission and vision as a Christian, liberal-arts 
college: 

■ The ability to acquire, integrate, and apply the body of 
knowledge found within the major functional areas, which 
include: marketing; management; accounting; finance; 
economics; strategic analysis, planning, and implementation; 
information management; and quantitative analysis. 

■ The ability to effectively communicate both orally and in 
writing including the use of computer technology as a 
communications tool. 

■ The ability to demonstrate the application of sound ethical, 
socially responsible, and moral principles in business 
decision-making and to integrate faith and work. 

■ The ability to apply the leadership, management, and team 
skills that are necessary for the successful planning, 
implementation, and control of the business enterprise both 
domestically and globally. 



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54 business administration (MBA) 



Financial Information 

Graduate tuition is $400 per semester hour for the 2007-2008 academic 
year. A non-refundable S30 application fee is required with the 
application. Applicants who are accepted in the program are required to 
submit a completed Enrollment Confirmation form and $300 deposit 
by the deadline stated in their letter of acceptance. Cohort positions are 
reserved in the order in which these items are received. Students are 
required to pay a $20 lifetime transcript fee their first semester. There 
are no other mandatory or course fees for this program. 

Students must make appropriate payment arrangements with the 
Business Office prior to the start of classes. Please refer to the Financial 
Information section of the catalog for payment and refund information. 

Financial Aid is available. Students should refer to the Financial Aid 
section of the catalog for information regarding general eligibility 
requirements, aid available for students enrolled in graduate programs, 
award criteria for the programs available, etc. Any questions students 
may have regarding financial aid may be addressed by contacting the 
Financial Aid Office, 800-447-4880. 



Laptop Computer 

Students enrolling in the program are issued a laptop computer that 
meets the minimum technical and software requirements as defined by 
the College's Information Technology Department. 

Students are required to sign a formal agreement at the beginning of the 
program stating that: 

■ The computer becomes the property of the student upon 
issuance. 

" The College maintains a security interest in the computer until 
the program is completed and all financial obligations to the 
College are satisfied. 

■ The computer will be returned to the College should the student 
withdraw from or be dismissed from the program. If the laptop 
is not returned, the student will be assessed a prorated fee. 



Library 

The P.H. Welshimer Memorial Library stands in the center of Milligan's 
campus and houses all of the general collections. The librarv currently 
holds over 77,500 volumes in its circulating collection (2,820 are 
dedicated to business). There are over 15,700 print journal volumes in 
its reference collection. The College currently subscribes to 
approximately 500 journals in print media (including the Academy of 
Management Journal, American Economic Review, Harvard Business 
Review, Journal of Accountancy, Management Review, and many 
others), and an additional 5,800 journals in electronic subscriptions. In 
addition to the volumes in the library, the College has a lending and 
usage agreement with Emmanuel School of Religion. Milligan is also a 
member of the Holston Associated Libraries, a consortium of six 
colleges and two public libraries that provide an enlarged circulating 
collection by reciprocal loan agreements. 

Admission Requirements 

The minimum requirements for admission to the MBA program 
include: 

• An undergraduate degree. 

■ Completed application, including writing sample essays that 
demonstrate the applicant's ability to communicate effectively 
in writing. 



■ Two professional recommendations that support the 
applicant's character and ability- to do graduate work. 

■ At least three years' work experience in a managerial or 
administrative position of responsibility. 

■ Coursework or demonstrated competency in accounting 
principles, principles of macro and microeconomics, 
management, marketing, computer applications, statistics 
and/or calculus. 

■ An acceptable GMAT score may be required if an applicant's 
overall undergraduate grade point average is 2.75 to 2.99. The 
GMAT is not required if an applicant's overall undergraduate 
point average is 3.00 or higher. 

■ Possible interview with members of the admissions 
committee. 

The admissions committee meets periodically throughout the year to 
evaluate applications. Applicants are encouraged to contact the 
Graduate Admissions Specialist or the MBA Program Manager for 
upcoming deadlines relative to admission. 

The admissions committee evaluates applicants on the overall merit of 
all admissions criteria. The committee allows strengths in some areas to 
compensate for weaknesses in another area. The overall intent is to 
admit students who the admissions committee believes will contribute 
effectively to the overall cohort and who are considered to have high 
potential for success in a graduate program. 

Transfer Credit 

Due to the nature of the program, transfer credit will be considered 
only on an individual basis by the MBA Director and chair of the 
Business Area. A maximum of six hours of graduate credit may be 
considered for transfer from other approved institutions to the Milligan 
College MBA program. 

Unconditional Acceptance 

Applicants who meet all admissions criteria are admitted 
unconditionally to the MBA program. Cohort positions are reserved in 
the order in which the Enrollment Confirmation form and enrollment 
deposit are received. If space is not available in the requested cohort, 
the applicant is placed on a waiting list or, alternatively, admitted to the 
next scheduled cohort. 

Conditional Acceptance 

Students may be accepted to the MBA program on a conditional basis, 
pending the completion of any or all of the following requirements 
specified by the Admissions Committee: 

o prerequisite course(s) 

o acceptable GMAT score 

o other preparations specified by the Admissions Committee 

Upon completion of all requirements, and at the discretion of the 
Admissions Committee, the applicant will either be granted 
unconditional acceptance or be declined for the program. All 
requirements must be completed and appropriate documentation 
received by the deadline(s) set by the Admissions Committee for an 
applicant to receive consideration for the requested cohort. 

Applicant Deferral Policy 

MBA applicants who have been conditionally or unconditionally 
accepted have two years from the date on the initial acceptance letter to 
satisfactorily complete anv necessary prerequisites and to matriculate as 
Milligan MBA students. If the applicant does not matriculate to Milligan 
within the time specified, it will be necessary to reapply to the program. 



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business administration (MBA) 55 



Temporary Withdrawal 
and Readmission 

Because of the nature of the program, students are encouraged to 
maintain continuous enrollment after beginning classes. Realizing that 
extenuating circumstances may occur that require a student to withdraw 
temporarily from the program, there is a provision for one such 
withdrawal. 



proper citation procedures. Failure to adhere to this level of 
academic integrity can result in dismissal from the program. 



Grade Requirements for Graduation 

Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of "B" (3.0) to 
graduate from the MBA program. 



Students who determine that it is necessary to withdraw from the 
program must notify the Director of the MBA and/or the MBA 
Program Manager. Written rationale for the decision to withdraw must 
be given by the student. That written request is attached to a withdrawal 
form that is routed to the appropriate College offices by the MBA 
Program Manager. The official date of the withdrawal is determined by 
the date the written request is received by the Director of the MBA or 
the MBA Program Manager. 

Students who withdraw from the MBA program receive "Ws" for any 
uncompleted courses in the semester in which they are enrolled at the 
time of the withdrawal. The grade of "F" is recorded for a student who 
withdraws after the withdrawal deadline. The withdrawal deadline is 
determined on a semester basis by the Registrar's Office. 

Students receiving financial aid who choose to withdraw from a course 
or from the program must understand that their decision can have 
significant consequences related to financial aid. Any refund of tuition 
or fees in case of withdrawal is governed by the refund policy in the 
finances section of the catalog. The registrar makes any exceptions to 
stated academic withdrawal policy. 

In order to be readmitted, students must have the approval by the 
Director of the MBA. Students must request readmission within three 
years of withdrawing. Readmission is granted pending space availability 
at the appropriate point in a subsequent cohort. Graduation 
requirements in effect at the time of readmission will apply. 

Please see the Milligan College Catalog regarding implications of 
withdrawal and/or readmission for recipients of financial aid.. 



Academic Probation 
and Retention Standards 

Retention in the MBA program is based upon academic performance 
and adherence to the College's code of academic integrity. Specific 
standards include but are not limited to: 

■ The student must maintain a cumulative grade point average 
of "B" (3.0 - computed at the conclusion of each semester) or 
the student is placed on academic probation. Under academic 
probation, the student has until the end of that semester to 
raise the cumulative GPA to at least 3.0. 

■ If the semester average on all courses taken during any 
semester falls below 2.0, the business faculty will review the 
student's record for possible dismissal from the MBA 
program. 

■ Students earning C or below in more than six hours of credit 
will be considered by the business faculty for possible 
probation nor dismissal. 

■ Failure to be removed from academic probation after one 
semester may result in dismissal from the program. 

■ The student must adhere to a high level of academic integrity, 
which includes, but is not limited to, completion of one's 
own work and refraining from plagiarism or the failure to use 



Faculty Adviser 



The nature of a cohort-based program minimizes the need for extensive 
and ongoing academic advising. However, it is recognized that 
questions related to such things as withdrawal, readmission, graduation 
requirements, and other academically related matters may arise. In the 
event of such questions, students should contact the MBA Director for 
assistance. The Director will either respond to your questions direcdy, 
or may forward your question to others for response. 



Course Descriptions 



ACCT 520. Accounting and Financial Reporting - This course is 
designed to increase students' knowledge of the construction and 
interrelationship of basic financial statements and their related 
components. The role of accounting and financial analysis for external 
reporting purposes, management analysis, decision-making, planning 
and control, as well as a primary means of increasing the value of the 
firm is emphasized. The relationship between ethical decision making, 
profitability, and long-term shareholder wealth is examined. Four 
semester hours. 

BADM 517. Marketing Strategy - This course examines the 
development of marketing strategy at the business unit level and its 
connection with corporate strategy. Emphasis is given to opportunity 
analysis, competitive evaluation, and marketing strategy design and 
revision. Three semester hours. 

BADM 522. Quantitative Methods for Management - This course 
focuses on the analysis of information gathered both internally and 
externally. Topics addressed include both the statistical analysis used in 
the decision-making processes at the managerial level as well as the 
constrained optimization techniques required in managerial economics. 
Four semester hours. 

BADM 530. Management and Leadership - This course examines 
current issues in leadership and appropriate strategies for implementing 
planned change. The course integrates materials from both micro and 
macro approaches to leadership and looks at the differences between 
managers and leaders, the leader-member exchange process, the leader's 
role in setting the strategic direction of an organization, and the ethical, 
moral and professional issues of leadership with emphasis on 
developing a biblical foundation of leadership. Three semester hours. 

BADM 533. Organizational Theory and Communication - This 
course examines the interaction of individuals and groups widiin 
organizations and the importance of communication within today's 
complex organizations. Topics include qualitative and quantitative 
assessment of various organizational structures, the behavior and 
interaction of individuals, small groups, and their leaders in 
organizations with primary emphasis on communication and the role of 
values and ethics within organizations. Human behavior in 
organizations is examined through case studies, group research projects, 
and individual analysis of behavior in groups. Three semester hours. 

BADM 535. Managing Human Resources - This course studies 
human resource management in depth and a strategic overview of the 
essential knowledge required to manage a firm's human resources 
effectively including both interpersonal and quantitative skills. It 
explores human resources within various structures and with different 



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56 business administration (ADCP) 



job, skill, and behavioral requirements. Emphasis is given to the ethical 
behavior by managers as they enforce standards throughout the 
organization and the strategic integration of human resource functions 
within the context of a firm's task environment. Three semester hours. 

BADM 541. Business Ethics from a Christian Perspective - This 
course examines the moral, ethical, social, and spiritual aspects of the 
practice of business. Students will explore the relationship between 
Christianity and commerce and the role of character in leadership and 
ethical decision making. Three semester hours. 

BADM 543. Strategic Management - Theory - This course examines 
policy making and administration of organizations from a general 
management point of view. It is intended to integrate and build upon 
the work of the core curriculum by emphasizing both quantitative and 
qualitative problem analysis, the process of making ethical and strategic 
decisions, administration and control, and continuous reappraisal of 
policies and objectives. Specific emphasis is placed on developing and 
implementing a strategic plan, building competitiveness through 
organizational capability, leadership and change management, and 
leveraging short-term performance through effective organizational 
leadership. Case studies emphasize the linkages between theory and 
practice. Three semester hours. 

BADM 545. Strategic Management - Application - This course 
allows students to build on the theoretical knowledge and quantitative 
and analytical skills acquired in the core curriculum. It provides an 
opportunity for the students to complete an applied project based on a 
management problem or issue. Students may choose either a case study 
project that analyzes a real-world management problem or a project that 
undertakes the investigation of a particular problem or issue within a 
real organization. This project is under the supervision of faculty of the 
Business Area and the deliverable of the course is a written 
analysis/report and a presentation to Business Faculty. 
Four semester hours. 

BADM 548. Legal Issues of Business - This course examines the 
legal environment and issues related to the practice of business. 
Students will explore legal and regulatory environmental variables and 
how they affect the process of management, decision-making, and 
strategy formulation within the firm. Three semester hours. 

CIS 520. Information Management - This course focuses on the 
management of information technology assets within an organization. 
The role of the manager in assessing, implementing, and controlling 
information technology and the handling of information is emphasized. 
Three semester hours. 

ECON 524. Managerial and Global Economics - This course 
addresses both macro and micro economic issues affecting the firm. 
The course emphasizes the application of constrained optimization 
techniques to common problems faced in the management of the 
typical business enterprise such as price determination, output lever, and 
the use of alternative productive resources. The course also addresses 
the broader environmental context in which the firm operates, 
considering issues such as international trade, market unification, and 
globalization, including an emphasis on understanding cultural 
differences. Four semester hours. 



Business 

Administration: Adult 
Degree Completion 
Program (ADCP) 

Area of Business 

Milligan College offers an adult degree completion program with a 
major in business administration. This major is designed for adults who 
have completed sixty or more semester hours of college credit and two 
or more years of full-time work experience. Degree candidates must 
also complete the College's general education core of humanities, social 
and behavioral sciences, natural sciences, and Bible as well as an 
appropriate number of elective courses. Inquiries are addressed to the 
Office for Lifelong Learning at 423.461.8782. 

The adult degree completion program in business administration 
supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearlv 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through stewardship 
of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and a rewarding 
career or profession. 

The business administration curriculum is designed for the career- 
oriented adult who intends to assume a professional role in society as a 
leader of business activities. Students are prepared for a career in 
business and industry as well as the not-for-profit sector. The study of 
business administration also contributes to the application of business 
principles in daily life. 



Graduates who complete the business administration major are 
expected to: (1) Demonstrate knowledge of the business core that is 
sufficient to provide each student with a comprehensive understanding 
of the discipline's major functional areas. Likewise, students will possess 
the requisite understanding necessary to integrate successfully the 
functional areas into a cohesive whole for the purpose of short and 
long-term decision-making. This body of knowledge will be sufficient 
for success in the workplace or in continued graduate studies; (2) 
Demonstrate knowledge of written and oral communication skills as 
well as the use of computer technology and mathematics sufficient to 
support the application of quantitative principles; (3) Exhibit the 
development of the leadership and management skills that are necessary 
for the successful planning, implementation, and control of the business 
enterprise, all rooted in a foundation of ethical and moral principles. 



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business administration (ADCP) 57 



Business Administration major - B.S. 
(48 hrs) 

ACCT 320B Accounting for Managerial Decision Making (4 hrs) 

BADM 315B Principles of Marketing (3 hrs) 

BADM 323B Business Law (4 hrs) 

BADM 362B Human Resources Management (3 hrs) 

BADM 363B Organizational Leadership (2 hrs) 

BADM 375B Small Business Management (4 hrs) 

BADM 401 B Principles of Management and Supervision (3 hrs) 

BADM 470B Business Strategy (4 hrs) 

BIBL 471B Christ and Culture (3 hrs) 

CIS 275B Computer Applications (4 hrs) 

ECON 201 B Macroeconomic Principles (3 hrs) 

ECON 202B Microeconomic Principles (3 hrs) 

ECON 301 B Corporate Finance (4 hrs) 

MATH 21 3B Business Statistics (4 hrs) 

Completing the major takes approximately 18 months. Completion of 
the degree is dependent upon the outstanding degree requirements. 
Therefore, the rime necessary to complete the degree can be better 
identified after the degree plan is filed (prior to admittance into the 
major). 

Admission Criteria 

1. Completion of fifty-two (52) or more semester hours, confirmed 
by official transcripts and evaluated by the Registrar's Office 

2. At least 21 years of age at time of application 

3. Two years of documented full-time employment or its part-time 
equivalent 

4. Good standing at previously attended institutions with a 
cumulative GPA of 2.0 (on 4.0 scale) 

5. Submission of two positive references-one character and one 
employer 

6. Acceptance of the lifestyle statement as evidenced by completing 
and signing the application form 

7. Submission of completed application and payment of the non- 
refundable application fee ($30) 



Probationary Admission 

The Admissions Committee has the option of admitting on academic 
probation any student with a cumulative GPA slightly below 2.0. 
Probationary status continues until the 2.0 is achieved. Failure to 
achieve the minimum grade point average by the end of the term may 
result in dismissal. 



Enrollment Deposit 

If a group reaches its maximum size and additional applicants wish to 
enroll, enrollment deposits of $100 (which apply toward tuition costs 
for the first term) are assessed. Confirmed admission to the group is 
granted on the date the enrollment deposit is received in the Office for 
Lifelong Learning. Enrollment deposits are accepted on a space- 
available basis and will not be accepted after the maximum number of 
students has paid a deposit. Students who pay a deposit and fail to begin 
classes for any reason can have their enrollment deposit rolled forward 
to the next group. If the student fails to enroll in that second group, the 
enrollment deposit becomes an administrative fee paid to the College. If 
the College denies admission for any reason, the enrollment deposit is 
refunded to the student. 



Returning Students 

A student who has withdrawn in good social and academic standing 
should address a letter to the director of lifelong learning requesting 
permission for readmission. A student who has been academically or 
socially dismissed may reapply for readmission by observing the 
following procedure: 

1. The student's letter requesting readmission shall be addressed to 
the director of lifelong learning 

2. The director will examine, in consultation with the registrar, the 
student's original academic records and any courses completed 
since the suspension 

3. Social dismissal is reviewed with the vice president for student 
development 

4. If there is reason to believe that the student will profit from 
another opportunity to do college work, he/she will be permitted 
to enroll with probationary status following at least one ADCP 
term out of class. 

5. In the event that it is necessary to suspend the student a second 
time, he or she will not be eligible to apply for readmission. 



Second Bachelor's Degree 

A student who holds the bachelor's degree in another field may elect to 
earn a second bachelor's degree in order to have a major in business 
administration. Students seeking a second degree must complete all 
forty-eight semester hours in the major at Milligan College and meet all 
the College's general education requirements (see General Education 
Requirements). Students who seek a second bachelor's degree may be 
eligible for financial aid. Questions regarding financial aid for a second 
degree are directed to the Financial Aid Office (423.461.8949 or 
800.447.4880). 



Tuition and Fees 

Application Fee (non-refundable) $30. 

Total Tuition ($275 per semester hour) $13,200. 

First Term $3,300. 

Second Term $3,300. 

Third Term $3,300. 

Fourth Term $3,300. 

Graduation Fee (added to Fourth Term Tuition) $65. 

*Posting Fee (per semester hour) $10. 

Technology Access Fee (per term) $87. 



*Credit earned through military training, credit by examination (includes 
CLEP and DANTES), and any other non-traditional assessment carries 
a $10 per credit posting fee. Additional fees may be charged by the 
testing organization. 

Students who must complete courses in addition to the major may 
register for additional courses at Milligan College. Tuition charges are 
based upon the current rate multiplied by the number of semester hours 
credit attached to the course(s). 

Tuition Reimbursement 

All students who use tuition reimbursement from their employer to pay 
their tuition must present a letter from the employer stating the 
company's reimbursement policy and the employee's eligibility. Milligan 
College will work widi die student and the employer and does not 
require tuition payment in advance. 



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58 business administration (ADCP) 



Institutional Scholarships 

Institutional scholarships are available only to students who pursue 
majors other than the ADCP business administration major. ADCP 
students are eligible to apply for state and federal tuition assistance 
programs, for employer reimbursement when applicable, and any other 
scholarship programs. 



Degree Requirements 

The student who completes the Bachelor of Science degree with a 
major in business administration must meet all general education 
requirements (GER). Students are not required to complete a minor; 
elective hours can constitute the balance of the degree. The degree 
requirements are as follows: 

1. Successful completion of 128 semester hours 

2. Successful completion at Milligan College of the forty-eight 
semester hours in the business administration major 

3. A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on all work (4.0 
scale) 

4. Successful completion of the general education requirements 

5. Completion of the senior examination 

General Education Requirements 
(GER) 

Some general education requirements (GER) are met in the ADCP 
business administration major. Students who choose to complete a 
second major are not required to complete any additional GER. 
General education requirements are graduation requirements and, thus, 
are not an admission factor. 



Withdrawals (intentional and 
unintentional) 

Students intentionally withdraw when they complete the appropriate 
paperwork to withdraw from a course or from the College. 
Unintentional withdrawal occurs when the student stops attending class 
and/or fails officially to withdraw. Unintentional withdrawal is a 
decision that has serious consequences regarding both academics and 
financial aid. The accumulation of significant tardiness/absence in a 
course, for any reason, can result in unintentional withdrawal. 
Unintentional withdrawal can result in a final course grade of "F." 

The deadline to withdraw officially from an ADCP course with a grade 
of "W" is prorated for the specific length of the class as follows: 



Class Length 

Three weeks 
Four weeks 
Five weeks 
Six weeks 



Deadline for Withdrawal 

End of 2nd class 
End of 3rd class 
End of 4th class 
End of 4th class 



Students intentionally withdrawing from classes receive "Ws." The 
grade of "F" is recorded for a student who withdraws (intentionally or 
unintentionally) after the withdrawal date. Students who choose to 
withdraw from a course must notify the Office for Lifelong Learning. A 
staff member from that office will complete the appropriate paperwork 
to affect the withdrawal. Students may not withdraw from class to avoid 
a failing grade in a course. 

Administrative withdrawal can occur when a student fails to meet the 
prerequisite(s) for a particular course, or when a student fails to attend 
the first two class meetings. However, the College is not obligated to 



provide administrative withdrawal, as it is the student's responsibility to 
manage attendance and registration. 

Students who determine that it is necessary to withdraw from the major 
must notify the Office for Lifelong Learning with written rationale 
regarding the decision. That written request is attached to a withdrawal 
form that is routed to the appropriate College offices. 

Any refund of tuition or fees in case of withdrawal is governed by the 
refund policy in the finances section. The registrar makes any 
exceptions to stated academic withdrawal policy. 

Students receiving financial aid who choose to withdraw or who 
unintentionally withdraw from a course or from the major must 
understand that their decision can have significant consequences related 
to financial aid. 



Failing Grades/Incomplete 

A student who fails a course (grade of "F") can be permitted to 
continue with the same group in subsequent courses for the term so 
long as the course failed is not a prerequisite to the following course. 
However, the course in which the failing grade was earned must be 
repeated successfully prior to graduation; a 2.25 cumulative GPA is 
required in the major for graduation. (See also "Probation and 
Dismissal" below.) In instances of serious personal emergency, a 
student may be unable to complete all the requirements in a particular 
course by the appointed date(s). In such cases, the student must 
continue to attend class and must contact the instructor to request that 
an Incomplete ("I" grade) be granted. The student must resolve the "I" 
within six weeks of the course's final meeting through continuing work 
with the instructor. Only under extraordinary circumstances can the 
student apply for an incomplete grade and the six-week extension to 
resolve the "incomplete" grade. Students are reminded to make every 
effort to avoid "I" grades that are recorded on the transcript. 



Repeating Courses 

Any student who must or wishes to repeat a course may do so on a 
space-available basis. Tuition is paid for any repeated courses at the 
current tuition rate for the group with which the student will meet for 
that repeated course. See Course Repeat Policy under Academic Policies 
in this Catalog. 



Course Attendance 

Because of the concentrated scheduling and the emphasis upon 
participatory learning, students need to attend even' class meeting. 
Please note that the emphasis is on attendance in a course. Students are 
expected to arrive on time for each class session. Attendance has a 
positive effect upon the learning that occurs in any course, but 
attendance is particularly important in condensed courses. Although 
emergencies may cause a student to be late for class or actually to miss 
an entire session, such situations should be the exception rather than 
the rule. When an emergency requires tardiness or absence, it is the 
student's responsibility to contact the instructor about missed 
assignments and class content. Making arrangements with a classmate to 
receive copies of class notes or a tape of the class can be useful but 
cannot equal attending class. Excessive absence can result in 
unintentional withdrawal and/or failure of the course. 



Calendar and Student Load 

Students enroll in major courses to total twelve semester hours each 
term. It is recommended that the student not enroll in any additional 
courses outside the major. However, those students who conclude that 
additional course work is prudent may take non-major courses if the 
student has the prior written consent of both the director of lifelong 



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business administration (ADCP) 59 



learning and associate registrar. Written consent is obtained when a 
Course Approval Form, available in the Office for Lifelong Learning, is 
completed. If the student fails to obtain written consent for non-major 
courses, Milligan College is not committed to apply those hours toward 
degree requirements. Although completion of all degree requirements is 
ultimately the responsibility of the student, this procedure supports 
accurate academic advising. 



Probation and Dismissal 

A student who fails to receive a 2.0 grade point average (GPA) during 
any period of enrollment at Milligan or who fails to have a 2.0 
cumulative GPA at any time is placed on academic probation or 
dismissed. The student's behavior and attitude exhibited toward 
academic pursuit are factors in determining probation or dismissal. If a 
student fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.0 by the end of the term 
in which the student is currently enrolled, the College is not obligated to 
grant the privilege of further study at Milligan College. 



Commencement and Baccalaureate 

Degree candidates are encouraged to participate in commencement 
ceremonies; ceremonies are conducted in May and December each year. 
Candidates for a degree are identified through their completion of the 
"Intent to Graduate" form. Degree candidates must have met all degree 
requirements and the student's account must be paid in full prior to 
commencement. Arrangements must be completed as early as possible 
through the Registrar's Office, the Office for Lifelong Learning, and the 
Business Office. 



Course Descriptions 

ACCT 320B. Accounting for Managerial Decision Making - A 

focus on the meaningful comprehension of accounting fundamentals 
through an analysis of the relationships between accounting events and 
financial statements. Topics include: cash flows, financial statement 
analysis, budgeting, and standards. Offered Term Two. Four semester 
hours. 

BADM 315B. Principles of Marketing - A survey of marketing 
principles and problems and a detailed analysis of markets, market 
prices, and marketing agents. Consideration is given to the struggle 
among the various agencies for the control of the market. Offered Term 
Three. Three semester hours. 

BADM 323B. Business Law - A study of the legal system with an 
introduction to legal concepts as they relate to commercial transactions. 
The course also includes an examination of different business 
organizations and legislation that regulates and affects such businesses. 
Offered Term Four. Four semester hours. 

BADM 362B. Human Resources Management - A study of the 
principles and policies governing employer-employee relationships and 
a consideration of the problems and practices of hiring, supervising, and 
terminating workers. Offered Term Three. Three semester hours. 

BADM 363B. Organizational Leadership - An introduction to 
leadership within an organizational context. The course explores the 
various dimensions of leadership and addresses how both leaders and 
followers are shaped by their organizational roles. Servant leadership 
(serving Christ as we serve others) is emphasized. Students apply these 
concepts to real world situations. Offered Term One. Two semester 
hours. 



research paper are significant parts of this study that partners theory 
with student experience in business and industry. Offered Term Four. 
Four semester hours. 

BADM 401B. Principles of Management and Supervision - An 

examination of leadership styles and motivational theory as applied to 
the management and supervision of people in business and institutional 
communities. Negotiations and arbitration are included in this focus. 
Offered Term Three. Three semester hours. 

BADM 470B. Business Strategy - An integrated study of the 
functional areas of finance, marketing, and management through a 
series of readings, lectures, and case analyses. This study of corporate 
and business level policy and strategy making is developed using a top 
management perspective. A comprehensive final project requiring 
significant research and case analysis is presented at the conclusion of 
the course. Prerequisites: BADM 315B, 401B, and ECON 301B. It is 
strongly suggested that students complete all other courses in the major 
prior to Business Strategy as this capstone course integrates the entire 
curriculum. Offered Term Four. Four semester hours. 

BIBL 471B. Christ and Culture - A study of the impact of the 
Christian faith as found in the New Testament upon contemporary 
Western culture. Some attention is given to conflicting ideologies 
expressed in literature, art, music, and media in the light of a biblical 
world. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered Term Three. Three 
semester hours. 

CIS 275B. Computer Applications - A study of the Windows 
environment and current Windows applications. "Hands-on" 
experience with word processing, spreadsheet, relational database, and 
presentation software emphasizes their utilization in a business 
environment. A student portfolio consisting of documents produced in 
each application is a significant course project. Offered Term One. Four 
semester hours. 

ECON 201B. Macroeconomic Principles - A study of demand and 
supply, private and public economic sectors, national income 
accounting, theories of employment, business cycles, and economic 
growth. Offered Term One. Three semester hours. 

ECON 202B. Microeconomic Principles - A study of economic 
decision-making at an individual consumer and firm level. Particular 
attention is paid to the theories of consumer and firm behavior as well 
as the demand for and efficient utilization of resources. Offered Term 
One. Three semester hours. 

ECON 301B. Corporate Finance - A study of the basic financial 
structure of the corporate tvpe of business enterprise. Emphasis is given 
to the various methods of financing and to the role that management 
plays in determining financial policy. Prerequisite: ACCT 320. Offered 
Term Two. Four semester hours. 

MATH 213B. Business Statistics - A study of data analysis and 
statistical inference as well as various statistical methods applied to 
topics in business administration. Emphasis is placed upon the use of 
statistical inference to reduce the impact of limited information from 
which business people must draw conclusions and make decisions. 
Topics include descriptive statistical measures, probability, random 
samples, skewness, random variables, analysis of variance, correlation, 
and regression. Twelve certifications in statistical exercises and a group 
project assist students in achieving course objectives. Offered Term 
Two. Four semester hours. 



BADM 375B. Small Business Management - A study of the 
concepts and theories that will help the student create, manage, and gain 
profit from a small business. Emphasis is upon those aspects of 
management uniquely important to small firms. Case studies and a 



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60 chemistry 



Chemistry 

Area of Scientific Learning 

The chemistry major supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearlv 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major field of study. 



■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

The chemistry curriculum is designed for the student planning a career 
in industry, research, engineering, teaching, or the biological sciences. It 
also contributes to the application of this science to daily life. 

Graduates with a major in chemistry are expected to (1) demonstrate 
skills in laboratory practices and instrumental techniques; (2) be capable 
of interpreting, evaluating, and clearly communicating scientific 
information in verbal format, written format, and/or computer-based 
technology; (3) be familiar with basic information contained in physics 
and mathematics or biology and physics or physics and mathematics; (4) 
demonstrate proficiency in three or more of the four major branches of 
chemistry (inorganic, organic, analytical, and physical). 



Chemistry major - B.A. (24 hours) 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is designed for students interested in 
chemistry but desiring a broad choice of electives not in the sciences. 

CHEM 170 and 171 General Chemistry (8 hrs) 

CHEM 202 Quantitative Analysis (4 hrs) 

CHEM 301 and 302 Organic Chemistry (8 hrs) 

CHEM elective (4 hrs) excluding CHEM 1 50 Chemistry and 

Society and 151 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry 
Other required courses (12 hrs): 
MATH 211 PreCalculus/Calculus I (4 hrs) 
PHYS 203 and 204 General Physics/Calculus (8 hrs) 

Foreign language through the intermediate level is required for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. 



Chemistry major - B.S. (32 hours) 

CHEM 170 and 171 General Chemistry (8 hrs) 

CHEM 202 Quantitative Analysis (4 hrs) 

CHEM 301 and 302 Organic Chemistry (8 hrs) 

Chemistry electives (12 hrs) excluding CHEM 150 Chemistry and 

Society and 151 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry 
Other required courses (12 hrs): 
MATH 211 PreCalculus/Calculus I (4 hrs) 
PHYS 203 and 204 General Physics/Calculus (8 hrs) 

Pre-requirements for paramedical and professional programs and 
graduate school vary depending on the program and the institution. 
Students must check the pre-requirements for admission to the 
programs they are interested in applying to and, with the help of their 
adviser, adjust their course of study so that the institution's pre- 
requirements are met.. It is strongly recommended that students meet 
with a science adviser to plan their course of study so that thev 
sequence courses to complete the major in a timely and fitting way. 
Eleven hours of the general education requirements (8 lab science and 3 
math) are fulfilled in the chemistry major. 



Chemistry minor (20 - 21 hrs) 

CHEM 170 and 171 General Chemistry (8 hrs) 

CHEM 301 and 302 Organic Chemistry (8 hrs) 

CHEM 202 Quantitative Analysis (4 hrs) OR 310 Biochemistry (5 

hrs) 



Course Descriptions 

CHEM 150. Chemistry and Society - A one-semester chemistry 
course which focuses upon chemistry in the context of every day 
experiences. Topics such as alternative fuels, plastics and polymers, 
nutrition, genetic engineering, and acid rain will be discussed within the 
context of their social, political, and ethical implications. The underlying 
chemical principles will be included on a need-to-know basis to help 
students develop critical thinking skills in the area of consumer 
chemistry. Not applicable toward a chemistry major or minor unless by 
consent of the Chair of Scientific Learning. Three-hour lecture and two- 
hour laboratory per week. Offered fall term each year. Four semester 
hours. 

CHEM 151. Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry - A one- 
semester survey of organic chemistry, including structure and 
nomenclature, functional groups, functional group reactivity, 
biologically important molecules, and introduction to human 
metabolism and nutrition. Not applicable toward a chemistry major or 
minor unless by consent of the Chair of Scientific Learning. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1 50, 1 70, or consent of the instructor. Three hours 
lecture, one-hour recitation, and one two-hour laboratory per week. 
Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours. 

CHEM 170-171. General Chemistry - A study of the principles of 
general chemistry including atomic/molecular structure, bonding, 
stoichiometry, equilibria, kinetics and descriptive chemistry of the 
elements. Laboratory work includes basic laboratory techniques and 
Qualitative Analysis during the second semester. Prerequisite: algebra, 
high school chemistry or CHEM 150, or consent of the instructor. 
Students wishing to take this course to fill the laboratorv science general 
education requirement must have the consent of the instructor. Three 
hours lecture, one hour of recitation, and one three-hour laboratory per 
week. CHEM 170 and 171 are offered as a year sequence beginning in 
the fall term each year. Four semester hours each semester. 

CHEM 202. Quantitative Analysis - A course including 
representative types of gravimetric and volumetric analysis and a studv 
of the techniques and fundamental principles of analytical chemistry and 
the stoichiometric problems. Offered fall term odd years. Four semester 
hours. 

CHEM 203. Instrumental Analysis - An introduction to the theory 

and application of electrometric, spectrometric, and chromatographic 
methods of analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 170 and 171 or consent of the 
instructor. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. 
Offered spring term odd years. Four semester hours. 

CHEM 301. Organic Chemistry I - A study of the structure, 
nomenclature, and reactivity of organic compounds, aliphatic and 
aromatic. Prerequisite: CHEM 171. Three hours lecture and one hour 
session on molecular modeling per week. Offered fall term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

CHEM 302. Organic Chemistry II - A continued study of the 
structure, nomenclature, preparation, and reactivity of organic 
compounds, aliphatic and aromatic, with the addition of spectroscopic 
techniques and functional group analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 301. 
Three hours lecture and two three -hour labs per week. Offered spring 
term each year. Five semester hours. 



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child and youth development 61 



CHEM 310. Biochemistry - A comprehensive study of the chemical 
process taking place in living cells with special emphasis on metabolism 
and related chemical principles. Prerequisites: CHEM 301 and 302 or 
the consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Five semester 
hours. 

CHEM 311. Organic Qualitative Analysis - A course in the standard 
methods of identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 
302 or concurrent enrollment. Offered spring term even years. Four 
semester hours. 

CHEM 401. Physical Chemistry - The study of the Laws of 
Thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and chemical kinetics. 
Prerequisites: CHEM 302, PHYS 204, and MATH 211 and 212. 
Offered fall term even years. Four semester hours. 

CHEM 402. Quantum Chemistry - The study of aspects of modern 
quantum theory including the Schrodinger Equation, Huckel Molecular 
Orbital Theory, and atomic structure relating to chemical reactivity. 
Prerequisites: CHEM 302, PHYS 204, and MATH 21 land 212. MATH 
307 Linear Algebra is recommended but not required; CHEM 401 is 
NOT a prerequisite. Offered spring term odd years. Four semester 
hours. 

CHEM 405. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry - Modern bonding 
theories are presented and applied to inorganic compounds, especially 
to coordination compounds. The effects of structure and bonding on 
chemical properties are explored. Synthesis and characterization of a 
variety of compounds are carried out in the laboratory. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 202 or concurrent enrollment. Three hours lecture and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. Offered spring term even years. Four 
semester hours. 

CHEM 490. Research Problem - Research on special problems in 
chemistry under the direct supervision of an instructor. Prerequisites: 
twenty hours of chemistry and consent of the faculty member to direct 
the research problem. Offered as needed. One to four semester hours. 

CHEM 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. 
One to three semester hours. 



Child and Youth 
Development 

Area of Education 

The child and youth development major supports the following goals 
of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will demonstrate social responsibility in numerous ways, 
such as serving in churches, on the mission field (domestic and 
foreign), and with social agencies; mentoring, nurturing, and 
protecting others; and displaying increased understanding of and 
experience with other cultures. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

Milligan College offers a child and youth development major for 
persons who wish to prepare for careers in working with children from 
birth through seventeen years of age. The mission of the program is to 
prepare caring and reflecting professionals who integrate their Christian 
faith, social responsibility, and sound scholarship in order to contribute 
to a responsible and caring community. 

Completion of the program prepares an individual for employment in a 
variety of settings including youth-serving organizations such as Boys & 
Girls Clubs, YMCAs, and military youth programs and private, 
governmental, and nonprofit early childhood programs such as Head 
Start, church preschools, military child development centers, and other 
settings that do not require public school licensure With the successful 
completion of the early childhood emphasis and additional courses the 
program can lead to licensure for persons who wish to teach in PreK-3 
or K-6. The child and youth development program includes general 
education courses, core courses for the major, and an emphasis in either 
early childhood administration, early childhood education, or youth 
program administration, and elective courses. 



Child and Youth Development major - 
B.S. (34 hrs) 

General Education Requirements (56 hrs) 

BIBL 123 Old Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 124 New Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 471 Christ and Culture (3 hrs) 

BIOL 110 General Biology (4 hrs) or BIOL 121 Environmental Science 

(4 hrs) 
COMM 102 Speech Communications (3 hrs) 
GEOG 202 Cultural and Ethnic Geography (3 hrs) 
HPXS 101 Fitness for Life (1 hr) and HXPS 208 Folk Dance and 

Rhythmical Activities (1 hr) 
HUMN 101 Humanities (6 hrs) 
HUMN 102 Humanities (6 hrs) 
HUMN 201 Humanities (6 hrs) 
HUMN 202 Humanities (6 hrs) 
MATH 1 53 Fundamental Concepts (3 hrs) 
PHYS 104 Earth and Space Science (4 hrs) 
PSYC 100 Introduction to College and Calling (1 hr) 
SOCL 201 Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) 



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62 child and youth development 



Core (17 hrs) 

PSYC 253 Child Development (3 hrs) or PSYC 254 Adolescent 

Development* (3 hrs) 
PSYC 280 Media Effects on Children and Adolescents (3 hrs) 
PSYC 356 Cross-Cultural Psychology (3 hrs) 
SOCL 303 Family (3 hrs) 

EDUC 231 Psychology of the Exceptional Child (3 hrs) 
EDUC 233 Child Guidance (2 hrs) 
*PSYC 254 for Youth Program Administration Emphasis 



Emphases 

Early Childhood Administration (non-licensure) (17 
hrs) 

ACCT 21 1 Introductory Accounting I (3 hrs) or ACCT 315 Not- 

for-Profit Accounting (3 hrs) 
BADM 375 Principles of Small Business Management (3 hrs) or 

CMIN 217 Foundation for Youth and Church Ministry 

(BADM 375 for public sector administration; CMIN 217 for 

church-related administration) 
EDUC 406 Eady Childhood and Elementary Curriculum & Methods 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 440 Creative Activities for Young Children (3 hrs) 
EDUC 443 Practicum (3 hrs) 
EDUC 475 Early Childhood Administration (2 hrs) 

Early Childhood Education (non-licensure) (17 hrs) 

EDUC 1 50 Introduction to Teaching (2 hrs) 

EDUC 355 Literacy Development (3 hrs) 

EDUC 406 Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum & Methods 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 440 Creative Activities for Young Children (3 hrs) 
EDUC 443 Practicum (3 hrs)** 
ENGL 354 Children's Literature (3 hrs) 



Additional requirements for licensure (using early 
childhood education non-licensure emphasis) 
PreK-3 Licensure (27 hrs) 

BIOL 350 Teaching Science to K-6 students (2 hrs) 

EDUC 1 52 Technology in Education (1 hr) 

EDUC 301 Introduction to Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education (3 hrs) 
EDUC 356 Reading Processes with Assessment and Intervention (3 hrs) 
EDUC 452 Student Teaching Early Childhood (12 hrs) 
EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 
EDUC 475 Early Childhood Administration (2 hrs) 
HIST 209 United States History Survey I (3 hrs) 
HXPS 440 Health and Physical Education Methods (2 hrs) 
MATH 253 Fundamental Concepts (3 hrs) 

K-6 Licensure (27 hrs) 

BIOL 350 Teaching Science to K-6 students (2 hrs) 

EDUC 1 52 Technology in Education (1 hr) 

EDUC 301 Introduction to Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education (3 hrs) 
EDUC 356 Reading Processes with Assessment and Intervention (3 hrs) 
EDUC 451 Student Teaching Elementary (12 hrs) 
EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 
HIST 209 and 210 US History Survey I and II (6 hrs) 
HXPS 440 Health and Physical Education Methods (2 hrs) 
MATH 253 Fundamental Concepts (3 hrs) 



**Not required if completing licensure. 

Youth Program Administration (21 hrs) 

BADM 361 Principles of Management (3 hrs) 

COMM 151 Introduction to Theatre (3 hrs) 

EDUC 440 Creative Activities for Children (3 hrs) 

EDUC 443 Practicum (3 hrs) 

HXPS 322 Psychology and Philosophy of Coaching (3 hrs) 

HXPS 409 Recreational Leadership and Outdoor Education 

(3 hrs) 
PSYC 357 Introduction to Counseling of Children and Families 

(3 hrs) 



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child and youth development (ADCP) 63 



Child and Youth 
Development (Early 
Childhood Education) 

Adult Degree Completion Program (ADCP) 

Area of Education 

Milligan College offers an adult degree completion program with a 
major in child and youth development with an early childhood 
education emphasis. Licensure in early childhood education (PreK-3) 
may be obtained by completing additional course work. This program 
prepares individuals to teach children through 8 years of age in public 
and private schools and to serve in leadership positions in church- 
related preschools, military child development centers, and in other 
early childhood programs. This major is designed for adults who have 
completed sixty or more semester hours of college credit and the 
equivalent of two or more years of work experience. Degree candidates 
must also complete the College's general education core of humanities, 
social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences, and Bible as well as an 
appropriate number of elective courses. Inquiries are addressed to the 
Office for Lifelong Learning at 423.461.8782 or Area of Education at 
423.461.8927. 

The adult degree completion program in early childhood education 
supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

• Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their 
ability to read and think analytically and critically, to 
communicate clearly and effectively, to evidence knowledge 
and competencies in the liberal arts and the natural and social 
sciences, and to understand a significant body of material in 
their major fields of study. 

• Students will gain an enriched quality of life through 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate 
studies and a rewarding career or profession. 

Graduates who complete the child and youth development major with 
early childhood education emphasis are expected to: (1) Demonstrate a 
comprehensive understanding of the growth and development of young 
children. (2) Demonstrate the teaching skills required to promote 
development and learning in young children. (3) Exhibit the leadership 
and management skirls necessary to plan and implement a 
comprehensive program for children and youth. (4) Demonstrate 
knowledge of written and oral communication skills sufficient to 
communicate effectively with students, parents, other professionals, and 
the general public. Those completing licensure are also expected to (5) 
Demonstrate the competencies required by the State of Tennessee to 
achieve a provisional teaching license and (6) Successfully complete all 
of the PRAXIS tests required by the State of Tennessee for a 
provisional teaching license. 



Child and Youth Development with 

Early Childhood Education Emphasis 

-B.S. 

(37 hours; 57 hours with licensure) 

General Education Requirements (47 hrs) 

If not completing licensure, alternatives may be considered to * courses. 
BIBL 123 Old Testament Survey (3 hrs) 



BIBL 124 New Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 471 Christ and Culture (3 hrs) 

BIOL 110 General Biology (4 hrs) or BIOL 121 Environmental Science 

(4 hrs)* 
GEOG 202 Cultural and Ethnic Geography (3 hrs) * 
Humanities (21 hours) 
MATH 153 Fundamental Concepts (3 hrs) * 
PHYS 104 Earth and Space Science (4 hrs)* 
SOCL 201 Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) * 

Core (20 - 26 hrs) 

EDUC 231B Psychology of the Exceptional Child (3 his) 

EDUC 233B Child Guidance (2 hrs) 

EDUC 440B Creative Activities for Children (3 hrs) 

EDUC 443B Practicum (3 - 6 hrs)** 

PSYC 253B Child Development (3 hrs) 

PSYC 280B Media Effects on Children and Adolescents (3 hrs) 

PSYC 356B Cross-Cultural Psychology (3 hrs) 

SOCL 303B Family (3 hrs) 

** Not required if completing licensure. 

Emphasis: Early Childhood Education (11 hrs) 

EDUC 150B Introduction to Teaching (2 hrs) 

EDUC 355B Literacy Development (3 hrs) 

EDUC 406B Earlv Childhood and Elementary Curriculum & Methods 

(3 hrs) 
ENGL 354B Children's Literature (3 hrs) 

Additional requirements for PreK-3 Licensure (32 hrs) 

BIOL 350B Teaching Science to K-6 students (2 hrs) 

EDUC 152B Technology in Education (1 hr) 

EDUC 301B Introduction to Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education (3 hrs) 
EDUC 356B Reading Processes with Assessment and Intervention 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 452B Student Teaching Early Childhood (12 hrs) *** 
EDUC 460B Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 
EDUC 475B Early Childhood Administration (2 hrs) 
HIST 209 United States History Survey I (3 hrs)* 
HPXS 440B Health and Physical Education Methods (2 hrs) 
MATH 253 Fundamental Concepts (3 hrs) * 

*** 15-weeks of supervised experience in a public school setting. 

Completing the major without licensure takes approximately 18 months. 
Completing the major with licensure takes approximately 22 months, 
depending on the outstanding degree requirements. Therefore, the time 
necessary to complete the degree can be better identified after the 
degree plan is filed (prior to admission into the major). 



Admission Criteria 

1 . Completion of 60 or more semester hours, confirmed by 
official transcripts. 

2. At least 21 years of age at time of application. 

3. Two years of documented full-time employment or its part- 
time equivalent. 

4. Good standing at previously attended institutions with a 
cumulative GPA of 2.0 (on 4.0) scale. 

5. Submission of two positive references - one character and 
one professional. 

6. Acceptance of a lifestyle statement as evidenced by 
completing and signing the application form. 



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64 child and youth development (ADCP) 



7. Submission of completed application and payment of the 
non-refundable application fee ($30). 



Probationary Admission 

The Admissions Committee has the option of admitting on academic 
probation any student with a cumulative GPA slightly below 2.0. 
Probationary status continues until the 2.0 is achieved. Failure to 
achieve the minimum grade-point average by the end of the term may 
result in dismissal. 



Enrollment Deposit 

If a cohort reaches its maximum size and additional applicants wish to 
enroll, enrollment deposits of $100 (which apply toward tuition costs 
for the first term) are assessed. Confirmed admission to the cohort is 
granted on the date the enrollment deposit is received by the Office of 
Lifelong Learning. Enrollment deposits are accepted on a space- 
available basis and will not be accepted after the maximum number of 
students has paid a deposit. Students who pay a deposit and fail to begin 
classes for any reason can have their enrollment deposit rolled forward 
to the next group. If the student fails to enroll in that second group, the 
enrollment deposit becomes an administrative fee paid to the College. If 
the College denies admission for any reason, the enrollment deposit is 
refunded to the student. 



Testing 



At least one term of work must be completed at Milligan 

College before credit earned by testing will be recorded on 

the transcript. 

No credit by exam will be allowed after a student has finished 

two terms in the Milligan College ADCP program. 

A maximum of 32 semester hours can be earned by testing. 

A recording fee of $10.00 per hour will be charged. 



Admission to the 

Teacher Education Program 

ADCP students who intend to pursue professional teaching licensure 
should file a statement of "Intent to Pursue Teaching Licensure" in the 
Center for Assistance to Students in Education (CASE) at the beginning 
of their first term at Milligan. Filing this statement will establish an 
initial program of study and designate an education adviser. Students 
initiate the application process leading to admission to teacher 
education while enrolled in Education 1 50, Introduction to Education. 
For full admission to the professional level of the teacher education 
program, students must have at least a 2.5 overall grade point average 
on a minimum of 30 credit hours. A minimum 2.75 overall grade point 
average will be required for subsequent approval to student teach. 
Students also must complete the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) 
with Tennessee approved scores, submit two letters of reference, and be 
accepted following an interview by the teacher education faculty, 
serving as an Admissions and Retention Board. Students with an 
Enhanced ACT score of 22 or an enhanced SAT score of 1020 are 
exempt from taking the PPST. Admission decisions will be made once 
each term. Completing all requirements for full admission to teacher 
education is the responsibility of the student. Students not vet admitted 
to teacher education or those admitted in either provisional or 
probationary status may not be allowed to enroll in professional level 
course work. Teacher candidates with PPST and/or grade point average 
deficiencies will not be approved for enrollment in courses numbered 
350 or above, including student teaching, without the permission of the 
instructor. 



Admission to the program does not guarantee continuance or 
completion. The teacher education faculty may recommend that a 
candidate not continue in the program if determined that such action is 
in the interest of Milligan College, the teacher candidate, or the 
profession. The candidate will then be administratively withdrawn from 
the program. 



Licensure 

Teacher candidates complete supervised field experiences and student 
teaching in public partner schools in nearby communities. During the 
final term, candidates complete a full-time student teaching experience 
and participate in a series of associated capstone seminars especially 
designed to provide opportunities to reflect on relationships between 
theory and practical experiences in education. Candidates will also 
develop and maintain a portfolio throughout the program to document 
emerging professional competencies. Final assessment of program 
outcomes (as reflected in the portfolio, the student teaching experience, 
and minimum scores on all PRAXIS II subtests required for the license 
sought) is a critical component of the capstone seminar. A passing grade 
in the capstone seminar reflects program completion and will not be 
awarded until all program outcomes are fully met. Early completion of 
all PRAXIS II subtests is strongly recommended to ensure completion 
of this course as well as the receipt of all credentials including one's 
academic transcript demonstrating program completion for submission 
to state regulatory agencies for licensure. 

Teacher candidates should anticipate various fees related to state 
licensure requirements. Fees will be incurred for completion of the Pre- 
Professional Skills Test (PPST) and the PRAXIS II, for purchase of 
liability insurance, for verification of CPR and/or first aid proficiency, 
and any other licensure requirements mandated by the State of 
Tennessee. 

Milligan College is approved by the Tennessee Department of 
Education for teacher education and is accredited by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 
Successful completion of this program leads to Tennessee licensure. 
Meeting all Tennessee licensure requirements is mandatory, even for 
those who intend to move to other states for employment. Through 
state reciprocal licensure agreements, some Milligan graduates also 
attain licensure in other states. 

Accreditation by NCATE ensures that a teacher education degree from 
Milligan is instantly recognized in Tennessee and the nation for its 
quality. Milligan College is one of only approximately 600 NCATE 
institutions nationally. Research has shown that graduates from 
NCATE institutions significantly outperform those from non-NCATE 
institutions on National Teacher Examinations. Milligan's commitment 
to meet NCATE standards means that each graduate of teacher 
education programs gains the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed 
for success as a professional educator. 

Portfolio 

Teacher candidates are required to develop a portfolio documenting 
their mastery of applicable Milligan College program outcomes. 
Portfolios are organized around outcome statements based upon 
Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium 
(INTASC) standards and must be submitted in LiveText during the 
student teaching semester. Initial and continuing full admission status is 
contingent upon periodic review of developing portfolios. Fall semester 
student teachers must submit portfolios for final review by the last 
Monday in November; spring semester student teachers must submit 
portfolios by the last Monday in April. Students failing to meet these 
deadlines will receive a grade of "Incomplete" in EDUC 460 Capstone 
Seminar. This grade of "Incomplete" will delay graduation, program 
completion, and recommendation for licensure. 



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child and youth development (ADCP) 65 



Student Teaching 



Approval to student teach is granted only to teacher candidates who 
have been fully admitted to the professional level of the teacher 
education program and who maintain eligibility at that level. In addition 
to meeting established minimum grade point averages and Tennessee- 
approved PPST scores, approval to student teach requires: 

1. A minimum overall 2.75 grade point average; 

2. A minimum grade of C-minus in all courses in the academic 
major; 

3. A minimum grade of C-minus in all required teacher 
education courses in the program of study; 

4. Liability insurance; 

5. Verification of CPR and/or first aid proficiency; 

6. Documentation of emerging teaching competencies in a 
portfolio; and 

7. Positive review by the Admission and Retention Committee. 

The candidate should expect to take no more than sixteen hours of 
credit (twelve hours of student teaching, three hours of MATH 253, 
and one hour of the capstone seminar) during the student teaching 
semester. Employment and other substantial extracurricular activities 
during the student teaching semester are strongly discouraged. As a part 
of the student teaching approval process, the director of teacher 
certification will determine that all prerequisite course work is 
completed and that any course work remaining to complete the Milligan 
College ADCP program may reasonably be completed in one remaining 
term. Prerequisite course work includes all professional level education 
courses and all courses in the academic major. 

Student teaching is an experience in instruction, assessment, and 
classroom management in an assigned partner school, combined with 
initial orientation classes and periodic evening workshops and seminars. 
Student teacher experience placements will be made with partner school 
systems located in the surrounding area in order to maintain proper 
supervision levels and the integrity of the teacher education program. 
The student teaching assignment typically involves experience at two 
grade levels during the fifteen-week period. During the student teaching 
semester, candidates observe the schedule of the assigned partner 
school instead of the Milligan College schedule. Absences for reasons 
other than documented illness or family emergency are strongly 
discouraged. Excessive absences may result in an extension of the 
student teaching experience after completion of the Milligan College 
semester. Successful completion of student teaching is a condition of 
graduation from Milligan College with recommendation for licensure. 



PRAXIS II 

Candidates completing the ADCP with licensure program are required 
to take the PRAXIS II test "Principles of Learning and Teaching" and 
appropriate Specialty Area Tests. Tennessee publishes a list of the 
required Specialty Area Tests and passing scores for each licensure area. 
This list is available in the Center for Assistance to Students in 
Education (CASE) or online at ETS. Graduation does not guarantee 
licensure. Any teacher candidate who fails to meet passing Tennessee 
scores on all required PRAXIS II tests and subtests is not a program 
completer and cannot be recommended by Milligan College for 
licensure. 



Center for Assistance to Students in 
Education (CASE) 

The Center for Assistance to Students in Education (CASE) provides 
coordinated assistance and support to students seeking professional 
teacher licensure at Milligan College. Located in the Teacher Education 
Curriculum Center, CASE attends to several critical functions 
throughout the various undergraduate and graduate teacher education 
programs of study. Accountability checkpoints have been established 
from initial contact with potential teacher candidates through post- 
graduation and post-licensure follow-up contacts. Academic 
advisement, field placements, mentoring, performance assessment and 
portfolio development, completion of graduation and licensure 
requirements, assistance with induction into initial employment and if 
necessary, tutoring and counseling are coordinated by and through 
CASE. 



Returning Students 

A student who has withdrawn in good social and academic standing 
should address a letter to the director of lifelong learning requesting 
permission for readmission. A student who has been academically or 
socially dismissed may reapply for readmission by observing the 
following procedure: 

1. The student's letter requesting readmission shall be addressed 
to the director of lifelong learning. 

2. The director will examine, in consultation with the registrar 
and the area chair for education, the student's original 
academic records and any courses completed since the 
suspension. 

3. Social dismissal is reviewed with the vice president for 
student development. 

4. If there is reason to believe that the student will profit from 
another opportunity to do undergraduate work, he/she will 
be permitted to enroll with probationary status following at 
last one ADCP term out of class. 

5. In the event that it is necessary to suspend the student a 
second time, he or she will not be eligible for readmission. 



Second Bachelor's Degree 

A student who holds the bachelor's degree in another field may elect to 
earn a second bachelor's degree in order to have a major in child and 
youth development with or without earlv childhood education licensure. 
Students seeking a second degree must complete all of the hours in the 
major at Milligan College and meet all the College's general education 
requirements (See General Education Requirements). Students seeking 
licensure must meet all the required State of Tennessee licensure 
requirements including successful completion of required PRAXIS tests 
and specific general education requirements. Students who seek a 
second bachelor's degree may be eligible for financial aid. Questions 
regarding financial aid for a second degree should be directed to the 
Financial Aid Office (423.461.8949) or 800.447.4880. 

Students who must complete courses in addition to the major may 
register for additional courses at Milligan College. Tuition charges are 
based on the current rate multiplied by the number of semester hours 
credit attached to the course(s). 



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66 child and youth development (ADCP) 



Student Accounts and Scholarships 

Students whose accounts are placed on hold by the student accounts 
coordinator due to lack of sufficient payment will not be able to 
register. Students who are not registered may not attend class or earn a 
grade. Those students must contact the student account coordinator to 
work out a payment arrangement before continuing in class. 

Institutional scholarships are available only to students who pursue 
majors other than the ADCP child and youth development with early 
childhood education emphasis major. ADCP students are eligible to 
apply for state and federal tuition assistance programs, for employer 
reimbursement when applicable, and any other scholarship programs. 



Degree Requirements 

The student who completes the Bachelor of Science degree with a 
major in child and youth development with early childhood education 
emphasis must meet genera] education requirements (GER) as outlined 
in this section of the catalog. Additional general education courses are 
required for students seeking licensure. Students are not required to 
complete a minor; elective hours can constitute the balance of the 
degree. The degree requirements are as follows: 

1. Successful completion of 128 semester hours. 

2. Successful completion at Milligan College of the child and 
youth development major (with early childhood education 
emphasis). 

3. A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 on all work (4.0 
scale). 

4. Successful completion of the general education requirements. 

5. Successful completion of the PRAXIS test in early childhood 
development (considered the student's major field test). 



Course Schedule 

First Term (12 semester hrs) 

EDUC 1 50B Introduction to Teaching (2 hrs) 
EDUC 152B Technology in Education (1 hr)* 
EDUC 301B Introduction to Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education (3 hrs)* 
PSYC 253B Child Development (3 hrs) 
SOCL 303B Family (3 hrs) 

Second Term (12 semester hrs) 

EDUC 233B Child Guidance (2 hrs) 

EDUC 355B Literacy Development (3 hrs) 

EDUC 356B Reading Processes with Assessment and Intervention 

(3 hrs)* 
ENGL 354B Children's Literature (3 hrs) 
HPXS 31 OB First Aid and CPR (1 hr) 

Third Term (12 semester hrs) 

BIBL 471B Christ and Culture (3 hrs) 

EDUC 406B Early Childhood & Elementary Curric. & Methods 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 440B Creative Activities for Children (3 hrs) 
PSYC 280B Media Effects on Children and Adolescents (3 hrs) 

Fourth Term (12 - 14 semester hrs) 

BIOL 350B Teaching Science to K-6 students (2 hrs)* 
EDUC 231B Psychology of the Exceptional Child (3 hrs) 
EDUC 443B Practicum (4 hrs) (for non-licensure only) OR 
EDUC 475B Early Childhood Administration (2 hrs)* 
HPXS 440B Health and Physical Education Methods (2 hrs)* 



PSYC 356B Cross-Cultural Psychology (3 hrs) 

Fifth Term (Required for licensure) (16 hours) 

EDUC 452B Student Teaching: Early Childhood (12 hrs)** 
EDUC 460B Capstone Seminar (1 hr)* 
MATH 253 Fundamental Concepts II (3 hrs)* 

* Required for licensure and/or to fulfill 45 hrs required at 
Milligan College. 

** 1 5 weeks of supervised experience in a public school setting 



Course Descriptions 

BIOL 350B. Teaching Science to K-6 Students - A course focusing 
upon the understanding of scientific principles and the teaching of 
science to K-6 students. Prerequisite BIOL 110 and PHYS 104 or the 
equivalent and admission to the teacher education program. Field 
experience included. Offered fourth term. Two semester hours. 

EDUC 150B. Introduction to Education - An orientation to the 
education profession from the perspective of the teacher. The readings 
and discussions are designed to be an introduction to the current 
knowledge base related to teaching. Emphasis is given to the 
characteristics of the caring and reflective teacher. Students will begin a 
teacher education portfolio in this class. A beginning school- and 
community-based practicum with related seminars is the focus of the 
course. Offered first term. Two semester hours. 

EDUC 152B. Technology in Education - Applications of technology 
for use in the PreK-12 classroom and for the teacher's record keeping 
and research. Offered first term. One semester hour. 

EDUC 231B. Psychology and Education of Exceptional Students - 

Education of exceptional students and the psychological aspects of 
exceptionalities. Includes discussion of assessment, family participation, 
IFSPs/IEPs, service delivery models, general curriculum, and 
intervention strategies. Includes observation and participation in 
classrooms with students with special needs. Offered fourth term. 
Three semester hours. 

EDUC 233B. Child Guidance - A study of skills and techniques for 
promoting positive behaviors in children birth through elementary age. 
Students learn how to manage routine situations related to care and 
education of children in a variety of professional settings from child 
development centers to elementary schools including the study of 
different approaches to classroom management. Field experience 
included. Offered second term. Two semester hours. 

EDUC 301B. Introduction to Early Childhood and Elementary 
Education - An overview of the education of children from birth 
through 12 years of age. History of the field, professional resources, 
educational models and theories, importance of working with families 
and appreciating diversity, and basics of developing curriculum. Field 
experience included. Offered first term. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 355B. Literacy Development - A study of how language with 
all its components develops and is nurtured to maturity. Emphasis is 
given to what brain research and learning research explain about 
learning, the language arts of listening, speaking, writing, spelling, 
reading, and thinking. Focus is on learning to use current methods and 
balanced strategies for assessing and teaching language and reading in 
the primary grades. Extensive field experience included. Enrollment 
limited to students admitted to the professional level of the teacher 
education program. Field experience included. Offered second term. 
Three semester hours. 

EDUC 356B. Reading Processes with Assessment and 
Intervention - A study of the diagnosis of reading skills and the 
objectives, methods, and materials for the correction of reading 
difficulties. Direct contact with children in tutorial and small group 



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child and youth development (ADCP) 67 



teaching situations is included. Enrollment limited to students admitted 
to the professional level of the teacher education program. Field 
experience included. Offered second term. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 406B. Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and 
Methods - A study of the educational needs of students in the cognitive 
realms of scientific, social, mathematical, and language learning. The 
focus is on planning and implementing a learning environment that 
provides hands-on discover}' learning where the student is an active 
participant and decision-maker. Emphasis is given to the integration of 
the content areas, especially math, science, social studies, and the 
language arts. Field experience included. Offered third term. Three 
credit hours. 

EDUC 440B. Creative Activities for Children - A study of the role of 
creativity in the education of children and pre-adolescents. The course 
includes experience in planning and conducting appropriate art, music, 
movement, and creative drama activities for children birth through 14 
years of age. Field experience included. Offered third term. Three 
semester hours. 



ENGL 354B. Children's Literature - A study of children's literature 
designed to acquaint the student with the literary contributions suitable 
for elementary grades. Not applicable towards an English major. 
Offered second term. Three semester hours. 

HPXS 440B. Health and Physical Education Methods - Reading, 
discussion, and application of fitness and health concerns of children. 
Kindergarten through Grade Eight. The course includes instruction and 
practice related to physical activity and rhythmical activities. Emphasis is 
on integration of health and physical education topics and activities into 
the school curriculum, grades K-8. Not for Human Performance and 
Exercise Science majors. Offered fourth term. Two semester hours. 

PSYC 253B. Child Development - An in-depth study of the physical, 
cognitive, social, and emotional development of the child from birth 
through adolescence. Development, care, and guidance of the child are 
examined in relationship to major theories of child and adolescent 
development. This course is designed for professionals who work with 
infants, children, and adolescents in a variety of settings. Offered first 
term. Three semester hours. 



EDUC 443B. Early Childhood Practicum - A supervised experience 
lasting for one semester or less in an early childhood setting (birth - age 
eight). For child and youth development majors who are not seeking 
professional teaching licensure. Offered fourth term. Three to six 
semester hours. 

EDUC 452B. Student Teaching: Early Childhood - An experience 
in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment, grades PreK-3. An 
extensive orientation prepares the student for student teaching 
experience (fifteen weeks) that includes the refinement of planning, 
instruction, and assessment skills in the classroom setting. Approval to 
student teach required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 460 Capstone 
Seminar required. Offered fifth term. Three, six, twelve semester hours. 

EDUC 460B. Capstone Seminar - A capstone seminar designed to 
promote reflection, in-depth discussion, and collaborative action 
research. Designed to integrate all elements of the program, document 
program outcomes in the candidate portfolio, and verify program 
completion. Also includes topical presentations by Milligan and partner 
school faculty. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the 
professional level of the teacher education program and approved to 
student teach. Co-requisite with student teaching. Offered fifth term. 
One semester hour. 

EDUC 475B. Early Childhood Administration - A study of the 
philosophy, organization, and components of developmentally 
appropriate early childhood programs. Administration, environmental 
aspects, staff development, and financial management of programs are 
examined. Offered fourth term. Two semester hours. 



PSYC 280B. Media Effects on Children and Adolescents - A 

seminar course in media literacy with an emphasis on the psychological, 
social, and educational effects on children and adolescents. The course 
includes discussion of the evolving nature of media and laws governing 
them. Such media include television, movies, the Internet, newspapers, 
magazines, music, and interactive video games. Discussion and 
assignments focus on the relative impact of these media on things such 
as body image, drug and alcohol use, sexuality, sociability, morality, and 
cognitive development. An emphasis is placed on becoming a media 
literacy advocate within one's own family, school, and community. 
Offered third term. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 356B. Cross-Cultural Psychology - An examination of 
culture's influence on behavior and thought. Students are expected to 
develop an understanding of cultural diversity from a psychological 
perspective. Students participate in a service-learning experience 
throughout the semester and visit culturally relevant sites on a class trip. 
The courses includes exploration of cross-cultural perspectives on 
cognitive, intelligence, health, emotions, communication, human 
development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. 
This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general 
education core. Offered fourth term. Three semester hours. 

SOCL 303B. Family - A study of the social significance of the modern 
American family viewed in the perspective of cultural heritage. Offered 
first term. Three semester hours. 



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68 children's ministry 



Children's Ministry 

Area of Biblical Learning 

Ministering to children in our society has become a significant service 
for Christians. Childhood is obviously a formative time of life, and 
being able to help children come to know Jesus as the Christ through 
scripture and the love and support of the church rises to great 
prominence as a form of Christian ministry. Children's ministers quite 
often meet the needs of entire families in the process of helping and 
ministering to children. 

Preparing people for this emphasis in ministry- fits very well into the 
mission of Milligan College. It clearly supports "A Positive, Personal 
Faith that Jesus is Lord and Savior" for that is the strength of this 
ministry and the whole reason for people pursuing this calling. Likewise, 
by affirming the necessity of integrity in any role of ministry, this 
specialization affirms "A Commitment to Follow the Teachings of the 
Christian Scripture in One's Personal and Social Ethics." The "Capacity 
to Recognize and Assume Responsibility in Society" obviously 
undergirds any professional ministry role, and a concern for "The 
Knowledge, Meaning, and Application of Sound Scholarship" is 
emphasized as part of a liberal arts education at Milligan College. More 
specifically, the focus on children leads naturally to "Participation in the 
Activities of a Healthy Lifestyle." Quite definitely, preparation for 
children's ministry supports Milligan College's overall mission. 

The Children's Ministry track in the Bible major, as also the Children's 
Ministry minor, prepares a person to participate fully in a ministerial 
staff of a local church and be able to assume other roles in addition to 
the focus on children. Because of the strong emphasis toward Bible and 
ministry, students are advised to take extra courses in child development 
and/or child psychology, and to consider electives from early childhood 
or elementary education backgrounds in order to broaden their 
readiness for working directly with children. Generally, such a ministry 
involves working with children from nursery age up through elementary 
and sometimes middle school ages. But ministers for both children and 
youth will find this minor or the children's ministry track in the Bible 
major effective for service preparation, as will people working with 
camps, Christian schools, evangelistic efforts, and other parachurch 
ministries. 

Milligan College expects those who graduate with a Bible major and an 
emphasis in Children's Ministry track to: (1) be equipped to stay abreast 
of changes in ministry to children and family involvement in the church 
and serve effectively through them; (2) be prepared for service in a 
leadership role of ministry in the church and able to function as part of 
a team/staff relationship; (3) have a good foundation in biblical, church 
historical and practical studies in order to prepare and deliver sound 
teaching to children and their families and to continue in lifelong 
learning; (4) be equipped to pursue seminary or graduate education with 
a good preparation for that advanced study; and (5) provide a good 
Christian example as a student of scripture and disciple of Jesus. 
Emphases of spiritual dependence upon God, solid academic study, 
including serious study of the Bible itself, and practices of both integrity 
and effectiveness highlight this program of study. 



Bible major - B.A. (39 hrs) 

Children's Ministry track (see "Bible") 

The Bible major with the Children's Ministry track — requiring 39 
minimum hours — leads to the B.A. degree, which requires 
intermediate proficiency in a foreign language. Language proficiencv 
satisfies a general education requirement, not a requirement of the Bible 
major. For biblical studies beyond undergraduate work, Greek is 
strongly recommended. 

Children's Ministry minor (21 hrs) 

Milligan College offers a minor in Children's Ministry, which consists of 
21 hours outlined below. Students pursuing the Children's Ministry 
minor are strongly encouraged to take PSYC 252 or 253 as three hours 
of their social learning requirement. 

BIBL 201 Jesus in the Gospels (3 hrs) 

BIBL 21 1 Old Testament Images of God (3 hrs) 

BIBL elective (3 hrs) 

CMTN 217 Foundation for Youth and Children's Ministry (3 hrs) 

CMTN 317 Materials and Methods of Children's Ministries (2 hrs) 

HIST 275 Selected Topics in the History of the Reformation of 

the Nineteenth Century (1 hr) 
HIST 341 and 342 Church History (6 hrs) 



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Christian ministry 69 



Christian Ministry 

Area of Biblical Learning 

Ministry or service, especially in the name of Christ, provides the fullest 
expression of realizing what Milligan College seeks to achieve. 
Motivation for ministry must come from "A Positive, Personal 
Christian Faith that Jesus is Lord and Savior" (the first statement of 
Milligan's Mission Statement) or it will never be effective or long lasting. 
Likewise, "A Commitment to Follow the Teachings of the Christian 
Scripture in One's Personal and Social Ethics," "The Capacity to 
Recognize and Assume Responsibility in Society," and "The 
Knowledge, Meaning, and Application of Sound Scholarship" all find 
opportune expression in Christian ministry. All of these are addressed 
specifically in the Bible major. 

The Christian ministry minor prepares people for serving Christ in a 
variety of ways, especially as a bi- vocational or volunteer leader. With 
the basic concept of Milligan College that "every Christian is a minister" 
of some type, this minor can prepare people specifically for service in a 
church setting or a church-related organization. Classes with this focus 
form a significant part of each major in the area of biblical learning, and 
the use of them as a minor provides a supplement to whatever other 
major is selected, positioning a person for effective service in a broad 
range of roles. 

Milligan College expects those who graduate with Christian ministry 
minors to (1) be prepared to assist in a leadership role of ministry in the 
church; (2) understand enough of the workings of a church staff to 
assume a position of responsibility in a church; (3) have a good 
sampling of biblical, church historical, and practical studies to 
encourage lifelong learning; (4) provide a good Christian example as a 
student of scripture. Emphases of spiritual dependence upon God, solid 
academic study including serious study of the Bible itself, and practices 
of both integrity and effectiveness highlight a Christian ministry minor 
from Milligan. 

Bible major - B.A. (37-39 hrs) 

See "Bible" for the major and information about specific emphases in 
various forms of Christian ministry. 



Christian Ministry minor (21 hrs) 

BIBL 201 Jesus in the Gospels (3 hrs) 

BIBL 21 1 Old Testament images of God (3 hrs) 

BIBL elective (3 hrs) 

CMTN 265 Effective Christian Evangelism or 276 Homiletics 

(2 hrs) 
CMTN 273 Introduction to Ministry (3 hrs) 
HIST 275 Selected Topics in the History of the Reformation of 

the Nineteenth Century (1 hx) 
HIST 341 and 342 Church History (6 hrs) 

A major course of study must be other than the Bible major. 



CMTN 250. Practical Ministries Colloquium A - Part of a series of 
practically oriented discussions of ministry in its various forms, 
comprised primarily of guest speakers and small group discussions, 
focusing on missions, Christian unity, and church and government. 
Required for the Bible major. Offered fall term alternate years. One-half 
hour per semester. 

CMIN 251. Practical Ministries Colloquium B - Part of a series of 
very practically oriented discussions of ministry in its various forms, 
comprised primarily of guest speakers and small group discussions, 
focusing on evangelism and "marketing," counseling, weddings, and 
funerals. Required for the Bible major. Offered spring term alternate 
years. One-half hour per semester. 

CMIN 252. Practical Ministries Colloquium C - Part of a series of 
very practically oriented discussions of ministry in its various forms, 
comprised primarily of guest speakers and small group discussions, 
focusing on ministerial ethics, finances, and church administration. 
Required for the Bible major. Offered fall term alternate years. One-half 
hour per semester. 

CMIN 253. Practical Ministries Colloquium D - Part of a series of 
very practically oriented discussions of ministry in its various forms, 
comprised primarily of guest speakers and small group discussions, 
focusing on worship, music, baptism, and communion. Required for the 
Bible major. Offered spring term alternate years. One-half hour per 
semester. 

CMIN 261. Introduction to Christian Education - A survey course 
introducing the student to the total program of Christian education in 
the local church. Principles, organization, curriculum, methods, 
leadership, and related matters are treated. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 
1 24. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours. 

CMIN 265. Effective Christian Evangelism - A focus on current 
forms and styles of Christian evangelism, following a brief overview of 
New Testament scriptures about evangelism and some methods used in 
the past. Some attention is also given to personal efforts at sharing 
Christian faith. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered spring term 
alternate years. Two semester hours. 

CMIN 270. Introduction to Christian Missions - A study of the 
biblical and theological basis for missions, pointing out the implications 
of ecumenics, anthropology, and changing world conditions for present 
missionary practice. Prerequisites: BIBL 1 23 and 1 24. Offered spring 
term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

CMIN 271. History of Christian Missions - A survey of the history 
and progress of missions since the beginning of Christianity. Same as 
HIST 271. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered spring term 
alternate years. Three semester hours. 

CMIN 273. Introduction to Ministry - A preliminary study of 
homiletics, church administration, worship leadership, ministerial ethics, 
and practical ministry (including attention to baptisms, weddings, 
funerals, etc.). Required for the Bible major. Prerequisites: COMM 102 
and BIBL 123 and 124. Offered fall term each year. Three semester 
hours. 



Course Descriptions 



CMIN 217. Foundation for Youth and Children's Ministry - A solid 
foundation in the nature and importance of the church's ministry to 
youth and children. Emphases include the nature and mission of the 
church as well as the personal and professional life of the youth or 
children's minister. Some field experience is included. Prerequisite: 
BIBL 123 and 124. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 



CMIN 276. Homiletics - A continued study of the preparation and 
deliven' of sermons, with considerable emphasis on student preaching 
and evaluation. Prerequisites: CMIN 273 and BIBL 123 and 124. 
Offered spring term alternate years. Two semester hours. 

CMIN 317. Materials and Methods of Children's Ministries - A 

study of models and resources for ministering to children in the church. 
Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124 and CMIN 217 or prior permission of 
instructor. Offered spring term alternate years. Two semester hours. 



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70 coaching 



CMIN 318. Materials and Methods of Youth Ministries - A study 
of the available models and resources for ministering to youth in the 
church. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124 and CMIN 217 or prior 
permission of instructor. Offered spring term alternate years. Two 
semester hours. 

CMIN 365. Christian Worship - A study focused on the leadership of 
Christian worship in a public context, including both practical and 
theological considerations. Some attention is given to planning and 
coordinating the various facets of a public service. Guest speakers and 
possible field trips are included. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. 
Offered fall term alternate vears. Three semester hours. 

CMIN 375. Narrative and Story-Telling - The study and practice of 
developing and using stories and other narrative forms to communicate 
biblical truth. Exercises involve the application of narrative materials to 
both sermon and lesson formats. Attention is given to using literary 
narrative materials as well as creating stories from one's own experience 
and observations. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered 
periodically. Two semester hours. 

CMIN 430. Servanthood in the Third Millennium - An examination 
of the nature of servanthood and the formation of the servant of Christ 
for the world. Topics include identity of the servant, spiritual formation, 
the role of community, the servant and culture, preparation for service, 
and serving across cultural lines. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. 
Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

CMIN 470. Current Issues in World Mission - A study of important 
movements and trends within the field of world mission. Topics of 
discussion include models of ministry, leadership and missions, the 
internationalization of mission, and mission to North America. 
Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered periodically. Three semester 
hours. 



Coaching 

Area of Education 



The coaching minor supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

■ Students will participate in the activities of a healthy lifestyle such 
as intramurals, intercollegiate sports, musical and theatrical groups, 
student clubs, student government, and other campus-sponsored 
extracurricular endeavors, in preparation for life-long participation 
in similar activities. 



Coaching minor (19 hrs) 

The coaching minor prepares students to coach in school or community 
settings or also to pursue graduate studies in coaching. 

HPXS 270 The Science of Athletic Performance (3 hrs) 

HPXS 302 Coaching and Officiating (total of six hours) 

HPXS 309 Sports Injuries (3 hrs) 

HPXS 310a First Aid and CPR (1 hr) 

HPXS 404 Organization and Management of Physical Education 

and Sport (3 hrs) 
PSYC 260 Sport Psychology (3 hrs) 



CMIN 491. Practicum in Ministry - Involvement in ministry either in 
a local congregation or a mission field with approved supervision and 
evaluation. Arrangements are to be made through the Supervisor of 
Bible internships. Two semester hours. Note: This requirement is 
normally met during a term of not less than eight weeks during the 
summer following the junior year at a location other than the student's 
home area. 

CMIN 491. Practicum in Missions - Involvement in ministry on a 
mission field with approved supervision and evaluation. Arrangements 
are made through the missions professor. Three semester hours. Note: 
This requirement is normally met during a term of not less than eight 
weeks during the summer following the junior year. 

CMIN 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Not offered every year. One to three 
semester hours. 



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communications 71 



Communications 

Area of Performing, Visual, and Communicative Arts 

The communications major supports the following goal of Milligan 
College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major field of study. 



■ The communications major prepares students to work in various 
specialties of today's media and to adjust to the inevitable changes 
that are ahead. This is accomplished through a curriculum 
blending critical analyses, theoretical issues, and practical skills. 
Central to the major is an approach to the study of 
communications from a distinctly Christian world-view. 

Graduates with a major in communications are expected to 1) 
demonstrate an understanding of how various media shape modern life, 
emphasizing the relationship between Christian faith and life; 2) 
demonstrate the ability to think and write clearly and effectively in their 
area of expertise (broadcasting, digital media studies, film studies, 
journalism, and public relations 3) demonstrate a practical knowledge of 
their area of expertise; 4) demonstrate knowledge of current research in 
their field of expertise; 5) demonstrate skill in computer applications 
relating to their area of expertise. 

The major in communications may be a B.A. program that requires 
completion of a foreign language through the intermediate level. The 
student may elect the B.S. degree that requires CIS 275 and, in the 
journalism and public relations emphases, MATH 213. 

In addition to the 15 hours of core courses, a student must complete 24 
hours in one of the following emphases: broadcasting, digital media 
studies, film studies, interpersonal and public communication, 
journalism, or public relations. 



Additional Opportunities 

Washington Journalism Center (WJC) 

A cooperative program with the Council for Christian Colleges and 
Universities, the Washington Journalism Center is an advanced, 
experiential semester in Washington, D.C. Students engage in both 
classroom instruction and hands-on reporting. The program is designed 
to cultivate professional news skills and encourage students to think 
through the implications of being a Christian working in the news 
media. Students are enrolled as full-time students for the semester and 
receive academic credit for the program from the college. 

Los Angeles Film Studies Program (LAFSP) 

A semester-long, sixteen-credit hour program sponsored by the Council 
for Christian Colleges and Universities. This program allows students to 
study filmmaking in Los Angeles while doing internships at businesses 
in the entertainment industry. In addition, the student completes 
COMM 371 History of Fiction Film. 



Communications major - B.A. or B.S. 
(39 hrs) with emphases 

Required core courses (15 hrs) 

COMM 101 Introduction to Mass Media: Culture and Religion 

(3 hrs) 
COMM 201 Principles of Interpersonal Communication (3 hrs) 
COMM 205 Reporting for Public Media (3 hrs) 
COMM 270 Film and Television Aesthetics (3 hrs) 
COMM 432 Communications Law and Ethics (3hrs) 

Emphases 

Broadcasting (24 hrs) 

COMM 284 Digital Audio Production (3 hrs) 

COMM 323 DV Production and Non-Linear Editing (3 hrs) 

COMM 325 Broadcast Writing, Production, and Performance 

(3 hrs) 
COMM 424 Broadcast Lab (1-3 hrs) 
COMM 484 Radio Lab (1 hr) 
COMM 491 Internship (3 hrs) 
COMM 494 Senior Portfolio and Exam (1 hr) 
COMM electives (8-10 hrs) 

Digital Media Studies (24 hrs) 

COMM 323 DV Production and Non-Linear Editing (3 hrs) 
COMM 451 Multimedia Production I: History, Theory, and 

Management (3 hrs) 
COMM 452 Multimedia Production II: Design and Production 

(3 hrs) 
COMM 453 Digital Imaging (3 hrs) 
COMM 491 Internship (3 hrs) 
COMM 494 Senior Portfolio and Exam (1 hr) 
COMM electives (5 hrs) 
CIS 318 Web Theory and Design (3 hrs) 

Film Studies (24 hrs) 

COMM 275 Screenwriting Workshop (3 hrs) 

COMM 323 DV Production and Non-Linear Editing (3 hrs) 

COMM 372 History of Documentary Film OR COMM 373 

History of Animated Film (3 hrs) 
COMM 470 Film and Television Criticism (3 hrs) 
COMM 475 Senior Film Workshop (Directed Studies) (3 hrs) 
COMM electives (9 hrs) 

Interpersonal and Public Communication (24 hrs) 

Required courses: 

COMM 341 Organizational Communication (3 hrs) 
COMM 345 Dynamics of Small Group Communication 
(3 hrs) 

COMM 350 Rhetoric: The Art of Persuasion (3 hrs) 
COMM 494 Senior Portfolio and Exam (1 hr) 

Additional 14 hours from the following courses or other courses 

with approval of adviser: 

CMIN 276 Homiletics (2 hrs) 

CMIN 375 Narrative and Story Telling (2 hrs) 

COMM 431 Feature Writing (3 hrs) 

COMM 489 Directed Readings (1-4 hrs) 

COMM 490 Directed Studies (1-4 hrs) 

COMM 491 Internship (3 hrs) 

ENGL 450 Introduction to Literary Criticism (3 hrs) 

HIST 343 History of Biblical Interpretation (3 hrs) 

PHIL 321 Ethics or BADM 421 Business Ethics (3 hrs) 

PSYC 259 Research Methods in Psychology I (3 hrs) 

SOCL 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs) 

SOCL 461 Dynamics of Cultural Change (3 hrs) 

THEA 141 Fundamentals of Voice and Stage Movement 

(3 hrs) 



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72 communications 



Journalism (24 hrs) 

COMM 237 Basic Photography (3 hrs) 
COMM 316 The Press in Society (3 hrs) 
COMM 431 Feature Writing (3 hrs) 
Production skills electives (6 hrs) from: 

COMM 284 Digital Audio Production (3 hrs) 

COMM 313 Desktop Publishing Layout and Design (3 hrs) 

COMM 325 Broadcast Writing, Production, and Performance 
(3 hrs) 

COMM 331 Specialty Reporting and Writing (3 hrs) 

COMM 335 Editing and Style (3 hrs) 

COMM 433 The American Magazine (3 hrs) 

CIS 318 Web Theory and Design (3 hrs) 
Visual skills elective (3 hrs) from: 

COMM 323 DV Production and Non-linear Editing (3 hrs) 

COMM 337 Photojournalism (3 hrs) 

COMM 453 Digital Imaging (3 hrs) 

COMM 456 Graphic Design (3 hrs) 
Practicum (2 hrs; must emphasize journalistic content) from: 

COMM 481 Print Media Lab 

COMM 482 Visual Media Lab 

COMM 484 Radio Lab 

COMM 485 Multimedia Lab 
COMM 491 Internship (3 hrs) 
COMM 494 Senior Portfolio and Exam (1 hr) 



COMM 141. Fundamentals of Voice/Stage Movement - A survey 
course introducing the student to major vocal production and stage 
movement theorists as well as the LeCoq-based mask work and an 
introduction to stage dialects and stage combat. Offered spring term 
each year. Three semester hours. 

COMM 151. Introduction to Theatre - The history and literature of 
the theatre from its Greek origins to the present. This course is 
designed to help the student relate drama in its historical context to 
contemporary man. Some emphasis is placed on films, dance, and 
musical theatre. The course is supplemented by films, attendance at area 
performances, and production work on the current semester's drama 
production. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

COMM 201. Principles of Interpersonal Communication - An 

introduction to the processes and dynamics of human interaction, both 
in face-to-face settings and in small groups. The study includes both 
verbal and non-verbal forms of communication as well as material 
related to symbolic interaction. Offered every term. Three semester 
hours. 

COMM 202. Intermediate Speech Communication - A study of the 
techniques of various types of speech communication, including the 
role of speech and the use of language in society. Prerequisite: COMM 
102. Offered fall term of odd years. Three semester hours. 



Note: A student may pursue alternative paths through journalism in 
conjunction mth his/ her adviser. The convergent nature of journalism may 
direct a student to different applications such as print journalism, broadcast 
journalism, or digital journalism. 

Public Relations (24 hrs) 

COMM 311 Public Relations Practices (3 hrs) 
COMM 313 Desktop Publishing Layout and Design (3 hrs) 
COMM 341 Principles of Organizational Communication (3 hrs) 
Advanced writing component (3 hrs) from: 

COMM 411 Writing for Public Relations (3 hrs) 

COMM 431 Feature Writing (3 hrs) 
COMM 491 Internship (3 hrs) 
COMM 483 Public Relations Lab (2 hrs) 
COMM 494 Senior Portfolio and Exam (1 hr) 
BADM 304 Advertising (3 hrs) 
BADM 315 Marketing (3 hrs) 



Communications minor (18 hrs) 

COMM 101 Introduction to Mass Media: Culture and Religion 

(3 hrs) 
COMM 201 Principles of Interpersonal Communication (3 hrs) 
COMM 205 Reporting for Public Media (3 hrs) 
COMM 270 Film and Television Aesthetics (3 hrs) 
COMM electives at the 300 and 400 level (6 hrs) 

A Film Studies minor (see Page 95), Photography Minor (see Page 128), 
and a Journalism minor (see Page 109) are also available. 



Course Descriptions 

COMM 101. Introduction to Mass Media: Culture and Religion - 

A foundational course designed to raise questions and issues about the 
interplay between mass media, faith, and culture. The emphasis of this 
course is on analyzing, from a Christian perspective, the relationship 
between and impact of media content, media use, individuals, belief 
systems, and societies. Offered everv term. Three semester hours. 

COMM 102. Speech Communication - A study of the basic 
principles of interpersonal, small-group, and public communication with 
emphasis on public speaking. Exercises in each area focus attention on 
individual needs and skills. Offered every term. Three semester hours. 



COMM 205. Reporting for Public Media - An introduction to and 
practice in writing for newspapers, magazines, and aural/visual media. 
Proficiency in composition is a prerequisite. The course focuses on the 
styles of writing for each medium as well as the fundamentals of news 
writing itself. Offered every term. Three semester hours. 

COMM 237. Basic Photography - An introduction to the 35mm 
camera and basic darkroom procedures. Students develop confidence in 
picture-taking and picture-printing procedures. Offered every term. Three 
semester hours. 

COMM 242. Fundamentals of Acting - A study of techniques in 
acting. Class exercises are designed to develop relaxation, concentration, 
and improvisation skills. Audition techniques, monologue studies, and 
scene study are also emphasized. Laboratory experience includes 
participating in some facet of the current semester's drama production. 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

COMM 270. Film and Television Aesthetics - An introduction to 
the artistic elements of the motion picture. The detailed analysis of basic 
film techniques and how they might be creatively manipulated for 
expressive effect are combined with the screening of films appropriate 
to class discussion. Offered every term. Three semester hours. 

COMM 275. Screenwriting Workshop - A studio course in writing 
for the short film. This course is prerequisite for all production courses 
in the film program, and students are expected to develop scripts that 
can be produced in subsequent filmmaking courses. Offered fall term 
each year. Three semester hours. 

COMM 280. Media Effects on Children and Adolescents - A 

seminar course in media literacy with an emphasis on the psychological, 
social, and educational effects on children and adolescents. The course 
includes discussion of the evolving nature of media and laws governing 
them. Such media include television, movies, the Internet, newspapers, 
magazines, music, and interactive video games. Discussion and 
assignments focus on the relative impact of these media on things such 
as body image, drug and alcohol use, sexuality, sociability, morality, and 
cognitive development. An emphasis is placed on becoming a media 
literacy advocate within one's own familv, school, and community. 
Offered January or May term each year. Three semester hours. 



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communications 73 



COMM 284. Digital Audio Production - A study of the processing 
techniques dealing with both live and recorded sound. Primary 
emphasis is upon the manipulation of that sound for radio broadcast, 
although consideration is given to live and studio recording. Content 
includes the understanding of the physical aspects of the creation of 
sound, proper use of microphones, sound mixing, as well as principles 
and techniques of recording and play back. Vocal sound production for 
speech and fundamentals of announcing are also covered. Offered fall 
term odd years. Three semester hours. 

COMM 310. Intermediate Photography - An opportunity for 
students to expand their understanding of techniques and ideas 
presented in Basic Photography. Emphasis is placed on personal 
interpretation and visual communication. Prerequisite: COMM 237. 
Offered every term. Three semester hours. 

COMM 311. Public Relations Practices - An introduction to the 
public relations process and industry, including a survey of tasks that are 
performed by every public relations practitioner. Emphasis is on the 
role of public relations within the media system as well as in the 
American social and political economy. Prerequisite: COMM 205. 
Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours. 

COMM 312. Introduction to Color Photography - An introduction 
to basic color materials and skills. Students learn color-printing 
processes. Aesthetics and technique are integrated throughout the 
course in hands-on printing sessions, critiques of student work, and 
lectures on color photography. Cross listed as ART 312. Prerequisites: 
COMM 237 and 310. Offered fall term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

COMM 313. Desktop Publishing Layout and Design - A course 
designed to give students practice and experience with the leading 
software programs to create professional-looking publications including 
postcards, advertisements, letterhead, business cards, logo designs, etc. 
Publication design concepts and theories are discussed. Other skills 
learned in this course include scanning, graphic editing, and digital 
camera basics. Prerequisite: CIS 275 or consent of instructor. Offered 
fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

COMM 316. The Press in Society - A study of the history and 
development of news and news media and their role and impact in 
modern societies. The course will examine cultural, religious, political, 
technological, and economic interactions between "the press" and the 
societies in which they operate, paying particular attention to the United 
States. Cross listed as HIST 316. Offered spring term odd years. Three 
semester hours. 

COMM 323. Digital Video Production and Non-Linear Editing - 

An introduction to the process of creating digital video media, whether 
for "limited" in-house use, web use, CD/DVD use, or for broadcasting 
purposes. The course provides an orientation to professional digital 
video procedures and equipment essential for quality field and studio 
productions. Students learn to use leading video editing software on PC 
workstations configured for editing video projects. Prerequisites: CIS 
275 and COMM 313 or consent of the instructor. Offered every term. 
Three semester hours. 

COMM 325. Broadcast Writing, Production, and Performance - 

Students concentrate on theory and skills used in professional broadcast 
writing. Attention is given to the process of news and feature writing to 
supplement visual material. Projects produced in the course are used on 
the weekly campus news show. Attention is given to student on-camera 
performance. This course includes discussion regarding the history of 
the broadcast medium. Prerequisites: COMM 205 and 323 or consent 
of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

COMM 331. Specialty Reporting and Writing - An in-depth look at 
the skills needed to apply basic reporting and news uniting techniques 
to specific subjects such as science, sports, education, the arts, and 



religion. The emphasis is on short, timely news reports. The class also 
considers trends in specialty publications and news services. 
Prerequisite: COMM 205. Offered fall term even years. Three semester 
hours. 

COMM 335. Editing and Style - A survey of the fundamentals of 
editing, style, layout, and production in print media such as newspapers, 
newsletters, and magazines. Attention is given to the impact of 
computers and emerging forms of technology, such as fiber optic 
networks. Lab work with The Stampede is required. Cross listed as 
ENGL 335. Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of instructor. Offered 
fall term odd years. Three semester hours. 

COMM 337. Photojournalism - An introduction to the relationship 
between photography and print media, including photographic 
techniques and processes. Special attention is given to the use of 
photography as an aid to news presentation. Prerequisite: COMM 237. 
Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

COMM 340. Fundamentals of Directing - A course emphasizing 
study of the various elements in the production of a play or a short film: 
theory, selection of play or screenplay, production, interpretation of the 
play or film, scene design, costumes, and make-up. The course 
culminates in the direction of a one-act play or short film for the public. 
This course is especially recommended for students preparing to 
supervise play or film production in the public schools. Prerequisites: 
COMM 270 and 323. Offered spring term even years. Three semester 
hours. 

COMM 341. Principles of Organizational Communication - An 

overview of organizational communication and the role that it plays in 
the American system. Attention is given to the nature of leadership, 
organizational structure in business and industry, and the role of 
communication in the process by which complex tasks are carried out. 
Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours. 

COMM 345. Dynamics of Group Communication - The study of 
how groups and collectivities of people organize and maintain 
themselves. The course includes a study of theories in group dynamics 
as well as an examination of why groups sometimes fail. Offered spring 
term odd years. Three semester hours. 

COMM 350. Rhetoric: The Art of Persuasion - An exploration of 
the fundamental features of rhetoric primarily using classical Greek and 
Roman theory. That theory is applied to modern attempts to persuade, 
but also the use of emotion, character, and style. Students will analyze 
and evaluate speeches and texts. Offered spring semester odd years. 
Three semester hours. 

COMM 371. History of Fiction Film - A survey of international 
narrative cinema, from the silent period to the present. Individual films, 
filmmakers, film movements, and film genres are studied, and important 
films from the respective periods are screened in whole or part. This 
course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general 
education core. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

COMM 372. History of Documentary Film - A survey of 
international non- fiction filmmaking from the silent period to the 
present, with a focus on individual documentary films, documentary 
filmmakers, documentary movements, and documentary genres. Class 
screenings introduce students to important and relevant examples of 
non-fiction cinema. Offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

COMM 373. History of Animated Film - A historical overview of 
motion picture animation, from the silent period to the present. Various 
animation techniques, animation styles, and animation artists are 
studied, and kev examples of animated films from around the world are 
screened in class. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 



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74 communications 



COMM 375. Cinematography Workshop - A course in basic 16mm 
morion picture photography, lighting, sound, and editing for films 
produced on location or within a studio setting. Short films produced in 
this course may be entered in festival competition. A lab fee is required. 
Prerequisites: COMM 270, 275, and 323. Course offering to be 
announced. Three semester hours. 

COMM 377. Animation Workshop - A course in basic motion picture 
and digital animation techniques. Short films produced in this course 
may be entered in festival competition. Prerequisites: COMM 270 and 
275. Course offering to be announced. Three semester hours. 

COMM 384. Digital Recording Techniques - A continuation of 
COMM 284 with a focus on obtaining sound in a studio or field 
environment, editing, and manipulation of recorded material for content 
and time considerations. Topics include microphone selection and 
placement, remote and studio recording procedures, creation and use of 
sound effects, and news documentaries. Prerequisite: COMM 284 or 
consent of the instructor. Offered fall term even years. Three semester 
hours. 

COMM 411. Writing for Public Relations - An introduction to the 
specialty writing skills related to this industry. Special attention is given 
to the creation of advertising copy for all mediums and the preparation 
of press releases and press kits. Intensive practice is given in the 
composition of brochures, newsletters, and informational speeches. 
Prerequisite: COMM 205. Offered fall term even years. Three semester 
hours. 

COMM 424. Broadcast Lab - An opportunity for broadcast students 
to reinforce the skills learned in the Non-Linear Digital Video 
Production and Editing course and the Broadcast, Writing, Production, 
and Performance course by becoming part of a broadcast team whose 
goal is to produce a quality thirty-minute weekly program which airs on 
local cable TV. Students have the opportunity to write copy, anchor, 
edit, direct, technical direct, produce, and serve as videographers, audio 
technicians, and studio and field camera operators to produce these 
programs. Prerequisites: COMM 205, 323, and 325. Offered spring term 
each vear. One to three semester hours. 



research regarding client assessment that is used in COMM 452. This 
course also provides instruction using authoring software. Offered fall 
term each year. Three credit hours. 

COMLM 452. Multimedia Production II: Design and Production - 

A course in which students develop and design a multimedia 
presentation for a client using authoring software. Students learn how to 
integrate digital media content, such as audio, video, and graphics to 
create an interactive multimedia project. This course is a continuation of 
elements covered in COMM 451 and builds upon the student's previous 
knowledge of desktop publishing, audio and video production, and 
scanning as well as other computer applications. Projects created may 
cover training, educational, and commercial content. Prerequisites: 
COMM 313, 323, and 453. Offered spring term each year. Three credit 
hours. 

COMM 453. Digital Imaging - An introduction to the basic design 
tools of Adobe Photoshop followed by the exploration of the depths of 
pixel based image manipulation and the world-renowned industry 
standard software package. The course covers photo restoration, surreal 
image creation, web page/interface design and optimization, and artistic 
expression through digital media. Offered spring term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

COMM 454. 3D Modeling and Animation - A course designed to 
ensure a high level of experience and exposure to the tools used in the 
3D graphic industry. Nurbs and spline modeling methods are used in 
the creation of photo realistic objects in the 3D environment. Strong 
emphasis is placed on lighting and texturing. Rendering, animation and 
particle systems are also topics addressed throughout the course. Course 
offering to be announced. Three semester hours. 

COMM 456. Graphic Design - A study of design principles, theories, 
and skills as applied to print, video, and web-based publication and 
production, with an emphasis on conceptual thinking and problem- 
solving. Practical techniques will be learned from conception to finished 
product. Students will complete projects using vector-based and other 
design software commonly used in various forms of mass media. 
Course offering to be announced. Three semester hours. 



COMM 431. Feature Writing - A practical course in researching and 
writing in-depth feature articles for newspapers and magazines, 
including a survey of trends in feature writing. Students submit their 
work to campus publications and to regional or national periodicals. 
Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of instructor. Offered spring term 
even years. Three semester hours. 

COMM 432. Communications Law and Ethics - A course 
addressing major ethical and legal issues in various mass media, 
including the integration of Christian thinking and values with a career 
in the field. Prerequisites: COMM 101, 201, 205, and 270, or consent of 
the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

COMM 433. The American Magazine - A course designed to 
introduce and explore the fundamental principles and practices of 
magazine publishing. During the semester, students create a plan to 
publish a new magazine, learning about concept development, editing, 
design, circulation, marketing, advertising, and finances. Students also 
discuss the history and cultural role of magazines in the United States 
and consider the impact of online publishing. Prerequisite: COMM 101 
or 205 strongly advised but not required. Offered spring term odd years. 
Three semester hours. 



COMM 470. Film and Television Criticism - A theoretical survey of the 
major literary, philosophical, ethical, and scientific approaches to motion 
picture analysis, perception, and understanding. Films that illustrate concepts 
discussed in class are screened. Offered spring term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

COMM 475. Senior Film Workshop (Directed Studies) - A studio 
course in independent short film production supervised by the film 
faculty. Students are required to enter the film produced in this course 
in festival competition. Pre-requisites: COMM 270, 275, and 375. 
Offered every term. Three semester hrs. 

COMM 481. Print Media Lab - A guided studies course in which 
students may receive course credit for advanced readings and special 
on-campus projects in print journalism. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. Offered every term. One-half to three semester hours. 

COMM 482. Visual Media Lab - A guided studies course in which 
students may receive course credit for advanced readings and special 
on-campus projects in television, video, film, and other visual media. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Course offering to be announced. 
One to three semester hours. 



COMM 451. Multimedia Production I: History, Theory, and 
Management - A survey of the history of digital media and reviews 
current and future technologies. The pre-production phase of 
interactive multimedia program development is examined. Aspects of 
multimedia relating to Web, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, Animation, and 
Virtual Reality are covered. Attention is given to the legal and ethical 
issues associated with digital media. This course includes hands-on 



COMM 483. Public Relations Lab - A guided studies course in which 
students may receive course credit for advanced readings and special 
on-campus projects in public relations. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester 
hours. 



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computer information systems 75 



COMM 484. Radio Lab - An opportunity for students to work with 
the campus FM radio station WUMC 90.5. COMM 284 plus two hours 
of 484 are required of all broadcasting majors to be taken during the 
sophomore and junior years. Students perform a variety of tasks from 
administrative duties to on-air board shifts. Non-broadcasting majors 
may enroll with consent of the instructor. Offered every term. One to 
three semester hours. 

COMM 485. Multimedia Lab - A guided studies course in which 
students may receive course credit for advanced readings and for the 
production of special on- or off-campus projects using multimedia 
development techniques. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. One to 
three semester hours. 

COMM 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings 
that provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester 
hours. 

COMM 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and 
conferences that provides for individualized study. Course offering to 
be announced. One to three semester hours. 

COMM 491. Internship - A practicum experience in which students 
work in a professional setting using media skills from major courses, 
either in print, visual, digital or public relations media. Offered every 
term. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of instructor. Three 
semester hours. 

COMM 492. Journalism Honors - A tutorial course providing an 
opportunity for seniors to work intensively on a major nonfiction article 
for publication. Students meet regularly one-to-one with a journalism 
professor as they work through the process of writing and submission 
for publication, including reporting, researching markets, writing drafts, 
and undergoing critiques. Students must apply to the journalism faculty 
for admission; only two students are accepted per semester. Priority is 
given to senior communications majors with a journalism emphasis, but 
other seniors and rising seniors from any discipline are welcome to 
apply. Offered every term. Three semester hours. 

COMM 494. Senior Portfolio and Exam - The preparation of a 
professional portfolio, a requirement of all students with an emphasis in 
broadcasting, digital media studies, journalism, or public 
relations/advertising during one of their final two semesters before 
graduation. Students also read and prepare for the comprehensive 
senior exam. Offered every spring and in fall as needed. One semester 
hour. 

COMM 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas 
beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from term to term. Course 
offering to be announced. One to three semester hours. 



Computer 
Information Systems 

Area of Business 

The computet information systems major supports the following goals 
of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, and to understand a significant body of material in 
their major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through stewardship 
of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and a rewarding 
career or profession. 

The major in computer information systems (CIS) is designed to 
prepare students for careers as programmers/analysts, lead 
programmers, management information systems directors, and systems 
project leaders for applications in business, industry, and government 

Course work in this major emphasizes systems analysis and design, 
programming, and management. It is recommended that students with a 
major in computer information systems complete a minor in a business- 
related area. 

Graduates with a major in computer information systems are expected 
to (1) possess a thorough understanding of the information systems 
analysis and design process, as well as the development (programming) 
and implementation (hardware, software, networking) processes of 
computing applications in a business environment; (2) possess oral and 
written communication skills necessary to convey technical information 
in a business or technical environment; (3) have acquired knowledge 
and skills needed for positions in a variety of computer/business-related 
fields. 



Computer Information Systems major 
B.A. or B.S. (39 hrs) 

CIS 201 Introduction to Information Systems (3 hrs) 

CIS 21 1 Programming I (3 hrs) 

CIS 275 Computer Applications (3 hrs) 

CIS 297 Visual Basic Programming (3 hrs) 

CIS 305 Database Management (3 hrs) 

CIS 341 Systems Analysis and Design (3 hrs) 

CIS 420 Data Communication and Networking (3 hrs) 

CIS 450 Software Engineering (3 hrs) 

CIS 491 Internship (3 hrs) 

BADM 365 Operations Management (3 hrs) 

MATH 213 Statistics (3 hrs) 

Electives in CIS (6 hrs) 

Foreign language through the intermediate level is required for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. 



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76 computer information systems 



Computer Information Systems minor 
(27 hrs) 

CIS 201 Introduction to Information Systems (3 hrs) 

CIS 21 1 Programming I (3 hrs) 

CIS 297 Visual Basic Programming (3 hrs) 

CIS 275 Computer Applications (3 hrs) 

CIS 305 Database Management (3 hrs) 

CIS 341 Systems Analysis and Design (3 hrs) 

CIS 420 Data Communication and Networking (3 hrs) 

MATH 213 Statistics (3 hrs) 

Electives in CIS (3 hrs) 

MATH 213 fulfills the general education requirement in mathematics. 
Proficiency tests are available for CIS 21 1 and 275 for students who 
already have knowledge in these areas. 



Course Descriptions 

CIS 201. Introduction to Information Systems - An introductory 
course in information systems. The primary objective is to build a basic 
understanding of the value and use of information technology for 
business operations, managerial decision-making, and strategic 
advantage. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

CIS 211. Programming I - An introduction to all aspects of 
programming and the problem-solving process. A structured high-level 
language is used with emphasis on designing, coding, debugging, and 
documenting programs. Laboratory use of a computer is an integral part 
of the course. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

CIS 275. Computer Applications - A study of the Windows 
environment and current Windows applications including "hands-on" 
experience with word processors as well as spreadsheets, data base, and 
presentation software. Keyboarding skills are assumed. Offered every 
term. Three semester hours. 

CIS 297. Visual BASIC Programming - An introduction to Windows 
application programming providing a rigorous and comprehensive 
course in computer programming for students with little or no 
programming experience. The student should have knowledge of the 
Windows operating environment. Offered spring term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

CIS 305. Database Management - A basic overview of relational 
database systems and relational database design. The student acquires a 
working knowledge of Microsoft Access and the ISO standard SQL 
language. Prerequisite: CIS 275. Offered fall term odd years. Three 
semester hours. 



CIS 313. Advanced Programming - A second course in object- 
oriented programming, which goes beyond the procedural concepts of 
programming. The course uses specific object-oriented techniques such 
as objects, classes, inheritance, and polymorphism. Prerequisite: CIS 21 1 
or 297. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours. 

CIS 318. Web Theory and Design - An introduction to the World 
Wide Web as both a user and a developer. This course is designed to 
take the user from creating web pages to designing a large Web site. 
Emphasis is on web design strategies and the use of existing software 
applications that generate web-ready code. Other topics include HTML 
and multi-media integration. Prerequisite: CIS 275 or permission of 
instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three credit hours. 

CIS 341. Systems Analysis and Design - A study of systems analysis, 
design, and implementation methods commonly used in systems 
development. The course provides an overview of the system 
development life cycle and in-depth coverage of the analysis phase of 
the life cycle. Prerequisite: CIS 211 or 297. Offered fall term even years. 
Three semester hours. 

CIS 420. Data Communication and Networking - An introduction 
to data transmission concepts and techniques. Topics included are: 
transmission media, analog and digital signals, data transmissions, 
multiplexing, network topologies, data security, Ethernet, token rings, 
and wide area network protocol. Prerequisite: CIS 21 1. Offered spring 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

CIS 441. Software and Hardware Concepts - A survey of technical 

topics related to computer systems with emphasis on relationships 
among hardware architecture, systems software, and application 
software. Prerequisite: CIS 211. Offered fall term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

CIS 450. Software Engineering - The senior capstone course in which 
students incorporate all aspects of previous study in computer 
information systems such as computer applications, programming, 
systems analysis, project management, and data communication to solve 
a real-life business problem. Prerequisites: CIS 305, 341, and 420. Open 
to senior computer information system majors only or by permission of 
the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

CIS 491. Internship - A practicum experience in which students work 
in a professional setting using computer information systems skills from 
their major courses. Prerequisite: consent of major professor. Offered 
every term. One to six semester hours. 

CIS 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor or major professor. 
Offered spring term odd vears. One to three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



economics 77 



Economics 



Area of Business 

The economics minor supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the social sciences, and to understand a significant 
body of material in their major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through stewardship 
of resources and preparation for graduate studies and a rewarding 
career or profession. 

The minor in economics allows students to gain broad-based exposure 
to a variety of economic topics. The minor provides the student with a 
better understanding of the modern economy, at both the personal and 
social levels and from both a contemporary and historical perspective. 



Business major - B.A. or B.S. (39-45 

hrs) Economics emphasis 

Milligan College offers a business administration major with an 
emphasis in economics. For further information on the business major, 
refer to the "Business Administration" listing in this Catalog. 

Economics minor (18 hrs) 

ECON 201 Macroeconomic Principles and 202 Microeconomic 

Pnnciples (6 hrs) 
ECON 370 Personal Finance (3 hrs) 
ECON 401 Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance or 403 Money 

and Banking (3 hrs) 
ECON 460 History of Economic Thought (3 hrs) 
LS 304 Law and Globalization (3 hrs) 

Business administration majors with an economics minor are required 
to take six hours of business administration or economics electives in 
place of ECON 201 and 202. History majors pursuing secondary 
teacher licensure may add an endorsement in economics by completing 
this minor. 



Course Descriptions 



ECON 201. Macroeconomic Principles - A comprehensive study of 
demand and supply, private and public economic sectors, national 
income accounting, theories of employment, business cycles, and 
economic growth. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

ECON 202. Microeconomic Principles - A comprehensive study of 
economic decision making at an individual consumer and firm level. 
Particular attention is paid to the theories of consumer and firm 
behavior as well as the demand for and efficient utilization of resources. 
Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

ECON 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the 
student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an 
individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. 
Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours. 

ECON 301. Corporate Finance - A study of the basic financial 
structure of the corporate type of business enterprise. Emphasis is given 
to the various methods of financing and to the role that management 
plays in determining financial policy. Prerequisite: ECON 202 and 
ACCT 212. Offered every semester. Three semester hours. 



ECON 331. Comparative Economic Systems - An introduction to 
the comparative study of economic systems, their underlying ideological 
foundations, and institutional arrangements. The historical and political 
context of various systems is analyzed along with the central 
organizational features of the major types of economic systems. The 
major topics covered are: the origins of capitalism; capitalism in theory 
and as an existing system; market-oriented economies; the Japanese 
economy; and the changing Chinese economic order. Special emphasis 
is given to the attempts at transition from centrally planned economies 
to market-oriented structures in the former USSR and Eastern Europe. 
Offered summer term each year as part of IBI program. Three semester 
hours. 

ECON 350. International Trade and Finance - A survey of the 
analytical and institutional aspects of international trade and finance. 
The historical and contextual elements are the foundation for the 
examination of current theoretical and empirical approaches to 
international economic and business relations. The classroom and the 
reading coverage are supplemented by resource persons from the fields 
of economics and management as well as institutions related to this 
subject area. Offered summer term each year as part of IBI program. 
Three semester hours. 

ECON 370. Personal Finance - An overview of personal and family 
financial planning with an emphasis on financial record keeping, 
planning spending, tax planning, consumer credit, making buying 
decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement 
and estate planning. Offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

ECON 401. Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance - A study of 
topics beyond the scope of Economics 301. Topics covered include 
capital markets, investment banking, long-term financing through debt, 
leasing, and stock issuance, dividend policy, convertibles, warrants, 
derivatives, growth through mergers and acquisitions, and international 
financial management. The course makes use of in-class problem 
solving, case assignments, classroom discussion, as well as classroom 
and on-site visits. Prerequisite: ECON 301. Offered spring term 
alternating years. Three semester hours. 

ECON 403. Money and Banking - A study of the monetary system 
and theory along with a survey of the commercial banking system of the 
United States. Banking principles are analyzed, and banking institutions 
are studied to observe the application of principles. Prerequisite: ECON 
202. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

ECON 460. History of Economic Thought - A study of the 
development of economics as a social science. Attention is given to the 
social and political context that has defined rules for economic behavior 
in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: 
ECON 201 and 202. Offered spring term alternating years. Three 
semester hours. 

ECON 470. Business Strategy - An integrated study of the functional 
areas of finance, marketing, and management with emphasis on case 
analysis, readings, and computer simulations. Prerequisites: BADM 315 
and 361 and ECON 301. Offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

ECON 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. One to three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



78 education: licensure 



Education: 
Licensure Programs 

Area of Education 

The undergraduate teacher education program supports the following 
goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 



■ Students will demonstrate social responsibility in numerous ways, 
such as serving in churches, on the mission field (domestic and 
foreign), and with social agencies; mentoring, nurturing, and 
protecting others; and displaying increased understanding of and 
experience with other cultures. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for the arts and sciences, stewardship of 
resources, and preparation for graduate studies and a rewarding 
career or profession 

The undergraduate teacher education program is designed to serve 
persons who plan to obtain professional licensure for teaching in early 
childhood (serving children from birth through grade three), elementary 
(serving children kindergarten through sixth grade), middle grades 
(serving children from grades four through eight), secondary (serving 
children from grades seven through twelve), special education (serving 
children from kindergarten through grade twelve), and selected K-12 
specialty fields (music, theatre, and physical education). Milligan College 
has voluntarily suspended the special education program due to limited 
demand. No new students will be enrolled in this program until further 
notice. Students interested in teaching in elementary schools may select 
early childhood (early elementary grades), elementary (K-6), and/or 
middle grades (upper elementary) programs of study. Education 
students may also choose to pursue careers in professional settings 
other than schools, e.g., child development programs, church settings, 
and post-secondary institutions. 

The Milligan College teacher education faculty is committed to nurture 
and develop caring and reflective teachers, those who reflect continually 
on their practice in search of excellence, and who care deeply about the 
students and families they serve. Knowing that every child deserves a 
quality teacher, we are committed to developing in our teacher 
candidates the professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions required 
to succeed in contemporary schools. Undergraduate and graduate initial 
licensure programs of study are available. 



General Information 

Admission to the Teacher Education Program 

Entering undergraduate students who intend to pursue professional 
teaching licensure should file a statement of "Intent to Pursue Teaching 
Licensure" in the Center for Assistance to Students in Education 
(CASE) at the beginning of their first semester at Milligan. Filing this 
statement will establish an initial program of study and designate an 
education adviser. Students initiate the application process leading to 
admission to teacher education while enrolled in Education 150, 
Introduction to Education, or immediately upon transfer from another 
program or institution. For full admission to the professional level of 
the teacher education program, students must have at least a 2.50 
overall grade point average on a minimum of 30 credit hours. A 



minimum 2.75 overall grade point average will be required for 
subsequent approval to student teach. Students also must complete the 
Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) with Tennessee approved scores 
and submit two references. Students with an Enhanced ACT score of 
22 or an enhanced SAT score of 1020 are exempt from taking the 
PPST. Admission decisions will be made once each semester. The 
application deadline for fall semester admissions is the last Friday in 
September. The application deadline for spring semester admissions is 
the last Friday in February. Completing all requirements for full 
admission to teacher education is the responsibility of the student. 
Students not yet admitted to teacher education or those admitted in 
either provisional or probationary status may not be allowed to enroll in 
professional level course work. Teacher candidates with PPST and/or 
grade point average deficiencies will not be approved for enrollment in 
courses numbered 350 or above, including student teaching, without the 
permission of the instructor. 

Enrollment in all teacher education courses numbered 350 and above 
requires admission to the professional level of studies or prior approval 
of the instructor. Admission to the program does not guarantee 
continuance or completion. The teacher education faculty may 
recommend that a candidate not continue in the program if determined 
that such action is in the interest of Milligan College, the teacher 
candidate, or the profession. The candidate will then be administratively 
withdrawn from the program. 

Licensure 

Teacher candidates complete supervised field experiences and student 
teaching in public or private partner schools in nearby communities. 
During one of the senior semesters, candidates complete a full-time 
student teaching experience and participate in a series of associated 
capstone seminars especially designed to provide opportunities to 
reflect on relationships between theory and practical experiences in 
education. Candidates will also develop and maintain a portfolio 
throughout the program to document emerging professional 
competencies. Final assessment of program outcomes (as reflected in 
the portfolio, the student teaching experience, and minimum scores on 
all PRAXIS II subtests required for the license sought) is a critical 
component of the capstone seminar. A passing grade in the capstone 
seminar reflects program completion and will not be awarded until all 
program outcomes are fully met. Early completion of all PRAXIS II 
subtests is strongly recommended to ensure completion of this course 
as well as the receipt of all credentials including one's academic 
transcript demonstrating program completion for submission to state 
regulatory agencies for licensure. 

Teacher candidates should anticipate various fees related to state 
licensure requirements. Fees will be incurred for completion of the Pre- 
Professional Skills Test (PPST) and the PRAXIS II, for purchase of 
liability insurance, for verification of CPR and/or first aid proficiency, 
and any other licensure requirements mandated by the State of 
Tennessee. 

Milligan College offers curricula for licensure issued by the State of 
Tennessee for early childhood educators (PreK-Grade 3), elementary 
educators (K-6), middle grades educators (Grades 4-8), secondary 
educators, special educators (special education program voluntarily 
suspended currently), and specialists in music, theatre, and physical 
education. Milligan College is approved by the Tennessee Department 
of Education for teacher education and is accredited by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 
Successful completion of this program leads to Tennessee licensure. 
Meeting all Tennessee licensure requirements is mandatory, even for 
those who intend to move to other states for employment. Through 
state reciprocal licensure agreements, some Milligan graduates also 
attain licensure in other states. 

Accreditation by NCATE ensures that a teacher education degree from 
Milligan is instantly recognized in Tennessee and the nation for its 
qualitv. Milligan College is one of only approximately 600 NCATE 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



education: licensure 79 



institutions nationally. Research has shown that graduates from 
NCATE institutions significantly outperform those from non-NCATE 
institutions on National Teacher Examinations. Milligan's commitment 
to meet NCATE standards means that each graduate of teacher 
education programs gains the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed 
for success as a professional educator. 

Portfolio 

Teacher candidates are required to develop an electronic portfolio 
documenting their master)' of applicable Milligan College program 
outcomes. Portfolios are organized around outcome statements based 
upon Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium 
(TNTASC) standards and must be submitted in LiveText during the 
student teaching semester. Initial and continuing full admission status is 
contingent upon periodic review of developing portfolios. Fall semester 
student teachers must submit portfolios for final review by the last 
Monday in November; spring semester student teachers must submit 
portfolios by the last Monday in April. Students failing to meet these 
deadlines will receive a grade of "Incomplete" in EDUC 460 Capstone 
Seminar. This grade of "Incomplete" will delay graduation, program 
completion, and recommendation for licensure. 

Student Teaching 

Approval to student teach is granted only to teacher candidates who 
have been fully admitted to the professional level of the teacher 
education program and who maintain eligibility at that level. In addition 
to meeting established minimum grade point averages and Tennessee- 
approved PPST scores, approval to student teach requires: 

1 . Maintaining a minimum overall 2.75 grade point average; 

2. Earning a minimum grade of C-minus in all courses in the 
academic major; 

3. Earning a minimum grade of C-minus in all required teacher 
education courses in the program of study; 

4. Obtaining liability insurance; 

5. Verification of CPR and/or first aid proficiency; 

6. Documentation of emerging teaching competencies in a portfolio; 
and 

7. Positive review by the Admission and Retention Committee. 

The application deadline for fall semester student teaching is the first 
Monday in February. The application deadline for spring semester 
student teaching is the first Monday in October. Applications processed 
after these deadlines will incur a substantial late placement fee. 

The candidate should expect to take no more than thirteen hours of 
credit (twelve hours of student teaching and one hour of the capstone 
seminar) during the student teaching semester. Employment and other 
substantial extracurricular activities during the student teaching semester 
are strongly discouraged. As a part of the student teaching approval 
process, the director of teacher education will determine that all 
prerequisite course work is completed and that any course work 
remaining to complete the Milligan College B.A. or B.S. program may 
reasonably be completed in one remaining semester. Prerequisite course 
work includes all professional level education courses and all courses in 
the academic major. Candidates pursuing licensure in two or more areas 
(i.e., middle grades and early childhood education) can expect an 
extended student teaching experience, possibly in a subsequent 
semester. 



Student teaching is an experience in instruction, assessment, and 
classroom management in an assigned partner school, combined with 
initial orientation classes and periodic evening workshops and seminars. 
Student teacher experience placements will be made with partner school 
systems located in the surrounding area in order to maintain proper 
supervision levels and the integrity of the teacher education program. 
The student teaching assignment typically involves experience at two 
grade levels during the fifteen-week period. During the student teaching 
semester, candidates observe the schedule of the assigned partner 
school instead of the Milligan College schedule. Absences for reasons 
other than documented illness or family emergency are strongly 
discouraged. Excessive absences may result in an extension of the 
student teaching experience after completion of the Milligan College 
semester. Successful completion of student teaching is a condition of 
graduation from Milligan College with recommendation for licensure. 

PRAXIS II 

Candidates completing any teacher education program are required to 
take the PRAXIS II test "Principles of Learning and Teaching" and 
appropriate Specialty Area Tests. Tennessee publishes a list of the 
required Specialty Area Tests and passing scores for each licensure area. 
This list is available in the Center for Assistance to Students in 
Education (CASE) or online at ETS. Graduation does not guarantee 
licensure. Any teacher candidate who fails to meet passing Tennessee 
scores on all required PRAXIS II tests and subtests is not a program 
completer, cannot be recommended by Milligan College for licensure 
nor granted a passing grade in capstone. 

In accordance with the United States Congress in the reauthorization of 
Tide II of the Higher Education Act, the Milligan College Teacher 
Education Program reports the pass rates of the PRAXIS II exams for 
2004 - 2005 program completers. 

One hundred percent of the education graduates passed all institutional 
exams for initial teacher licensure. 

Aggregate pass rates for 2005 - 2006 were: 

Professional Knowledge 100% 

Academic Content 100% 

Tests Required for All Licensure Candidates 

Effective September 1 , 2006, even' Initial Licensure Applicant is 
required to take one of the following PLT exams: 

Passing 
Test Code/Title Score 

0521 Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) P-4 155 



OR 
0522 Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) K-6 



155 



OR 
0523 Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) 5-9 



154 



OR 
0524 Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) 7-12 



159 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



80 education: licensure 



Specialty Area Tests 

Endorsement Area Test 

Code 



Test Title 



Passing 
Score 



** 


Biology 


0235 


Biol: Content Knowledge, Part 1 


148 


415 






Choice of: 








0233 


Biology: Cont. Essays 
QE 


146 






0433 


General Science Cont. Essays 


130 


474 


Business Education 


0100 


Business Education 


570 


** 


Chemistry 


0245 


Chemistry: Content Knowledge 


152 


416 




0431 


Gen Sc: Content Knowledge, Part 1 


145 


467 


Early Child Ed 


0021 


Education of Young Children 


155 


497 


PreK-3 


0014 


Elementary School: Content 


140 




Early Child Ed 


0201 


Knowledge 


151 




PreK-4 




Reading Across Curriculum: 
Elementary 





499 Elementary (K-6) 0011 
0201 



Elementary Educ: Curriculum. 
Instruction and Assessment 
Reading Across Curriculum: 
Elementary 



159 
151 







0014 


Choice of: 

Elementary Educ: Content Knowledge 


140 


407 


English 


0041 
0043 


Lang., Lit., Comp.: Cont. Knowledge 
Lang., Lit., Comp.: Pedagogy 


157 
145 


411 


French (7-12) 


0173 
0171 


French: Content Knowledge 
French: Productive Language Skills 


160 
165 


412 


German (7-12) 


0181 


German: Content Knowledge 


149 


421 


History 


0941 


World and U.S. History 


136 


413 


Mathematics 


0061 
0065 


Mathematics: Content Knowledge 
Mathematics: Pedagogy 


136 
125 


400 
440 


Middle Grades 5-8 
Middle Grades 4-8 


0146 
0201 


Middle School: Content Knowledge 
Reading Across Curriculum: 
Elementary 


150 
151 


428 
429 


Music (Vocal/Gen.) 

Music 

(Instrumental) 


0111 
0113 


Music: Concepts and Processes 
Music: Content Knowledge 


145 
150 


420 


Phys. Education 
(K-12) 


0091 
0092 


P.E.: Content Knowledge 
P.E.: Movement, Forms A & D 


152 
148 


426 


Psychology 


0390 


Psychology 


560 


425 


Sociology 


0950 


Sociology 


540 


409 


Spanish (7-12) 


0191 
0192 


Spanish: Content Knowledge 
Spanish: Prod. Language Skills 


152 
154 


405 


Theater 


0640 


Theater 


610 




** Note: Candidates who have already completed test modules specified for one 
science area, including Earth Science and General Science, will be required to take only 
the content knowledge exam for endorsement in an additional science area. 



Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses 

Undergraduate students may take up to 9 hours of courses for graduate 
credit in education, after they have completed 90 hours of 
undergraduate course work, and have these credits apply toward their 
Master of Education degree. Students earning graduate credit in 
undergraduate courses will be required to complete additional course 
requirements. These credits must be in addition to at least 128 credits of 
undergraduate work. Outlined below are the courses that may be taken 
and a list of the courses for which graduate credit may be earned. 



Undergraduate Course 



Graduate Course 



EDUC 356 Reading Processes with 
Assessment and Intervention 



EDUC 527 Content Area Reading 



EDUC 356 Literacy Development 



EDUC 577 Language Arts and Reading 



EDUC 406 Early Childhood and 
Elementary Curriculum and Methods 



EDUC 576 Early Childhood and 
Elementary Curriculum and Methods 



EDUC 440 Creative Activities for Young 
Children 



EDUC 541 Integrating the Arts into 
Curriculum 



EDUC 475 Early Childhood 
Administration 



EDUC 575 Advanced Early Childhood 
Administration 



HXPS 440 Health and Physical Education 
Methods 



EDUC 540 Health and Physical Education 
Methods 



EDUC 357 Content Area Reading 



EDUC 527 Content Area Reading 



EDUC 408 Middle Grades and Secondary 
Curriculum and Methods 



EDUC 520 Middle Grades and Secondary 
Curriculum and Methods 



EDUC 306 Middle Grades and Secondary 
Foundations 



EDUC 562 Seminar in Middle Grades and 
Secondary Foundations 



Center for Assistance to Students in Education (CASE) 

The Center for Assistance to Students in Education (CASE) provides 
coordinated assistance and support to students seeking professional 
teacher licensure at Milligan College. Located in the Teacher Education 
Curriculum Center, CASE attends to several critical functions 
throughout the various undergraduate and graduate teacher education 
programs of study. Accountability checkpoints have been established 
from initial contact with potential teacher candidates through post- 
graduation and post-licensure follow-up contacts. Academic 
advisement, field placements, mentoring, performance assessment and 
portfolio development, completion of graduation and licensure 
requirements, assistance with induction into initial emplovment and if 
necessary, tutoring and counseling are coordinated by and through 
CASE. 

Curriculum Center and 

Paul Clark Teacher Education Center 

The Curriculum Center houses a collection of textbooks, instructional 
materials, curriculum guides, professional books, and electronic 
resources. Also included are audiotapes, videotapes, and educational 
computer software. A work space where teacher candidates can produce 
materials for learning centers and bulletin boards is a part of the Center 
as well as a scanner, laminator, lettering machine, transparency maker, 
and various consumable supplies for the production of such materials. 
Also housed in the Curriculum Center are digital cameras, videocassette 
recorders, and several camcorders. Computer terminals also provide 
electronic access to the P. H. Welshimer Library and other resources via 
the Internet. The Paul Clark Teacher Education Center includes a 
technology classroom and conference room. Located adjacent to the 
curriculum center and CASE, the Paul Clark facility provides a model 
environment for professional education studies. 

Library 

The P. H. Welshimer Library supports the academic program by 
providing research materials in all subject areas. In addition to print 
monographs and journals in education, the Library provides access to 
extensive education journals and research literature through the 
Education Research Complete, Academic OneFile, JSTOR, and 
Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) online databases. 
The Library holds the ERIC documents on microfiche from 1980 
through 2004. 

The Library is a participating member in the shared online catalog of 
the Appalachian College Association's (ACA) Bowen Central Library' of 
Appalachia. The holdings of Milligan College are set as the default 
within the catalog display. However, the catalog allows the holdings of 
other participating ACA libraries to be searched. The Library also 
subscribes to WorldCat, an online catalog that gives Milligan students 
access, through our interlibrary loan service, to the holdings of 
thousands of libraries worldwide. Locally, the Library participates in 
resource-sharing agreements with the libraries of Emmanuel School of 
Religion and East Tennessee State University (main campus and 
medical school). 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



education: licensure 81 



Undergraduate Initial 
Licensure Programs 



Academic Major 


Hrs 


Licensure Areas 


Srade 
Level 


Available 

Degree 

Programs 


Biology 


24 
32 
32 


Elementary Education 

Middle Grades 

Secondary Education (Biology) 


K-6 
4-8 
7-12 


BA 


BS 
BS 


Business Administration 


36 

45 


Secondary Education (Business) 
Secondary Education (Business- 
Technology) 


7-12 
7-12 


BA 

BA 


BS 
BS 


Chemistry 


24* 


Elementary Education 

Middle Grades 

Secondary Education (Chemistry 


K-6 
4-8 
7-12 


BA 
BA 
BA 


BS 
BS 


Child and Youth 
Development 


34 


Early Childhood Education 


Prek-C 




BS 


English 


30* 


Elementary Education 

Middle Grades 

Secondary Education (English) 


K-6 
4-8 
7-12 


BA 
BA 
BA 




Fine Arts - Theatre 


38-47 


Theatre 


K-12 


BA 




History 


31* 


Elementary Education 
Middle Grades 

Secondary Education (History) 
Secondary Education (History- 
Economics) 


K-6 
4-8 
7-12 
7-12 


BA 
BA 
BA 
BA 




Humanities-English 
Concentration 


24+ 
24 


Elementary Education (see 
special program listed in 
Humanities) 
Middle Grades 


K-6 
4-8 


BA 
BA 




Humanities-French 
Concentration 


24+ 
18 


Elementary Education 

Middle Grades 

Secondary Education (French) 


K-6 
4-8 
7-12 


BA 
BA 
BA 




Humanities-German 
Concentration 


24+ 
18 


Middle Grades 

Secondary Education (German) 


4-8 
7-12 


BA 
BA 




Humanities-History 
Concentration 


24+ 
24 


Elementary Education (see 
special program listed in 
Humanities) 
Middle Grades 


K-6 
4-8 


BA 
BA 




Humanities-Spanish 
Concentration 


24+ 
18 


Elementary Education 

Middle Grades 

Secondary Education (Spanish) 


K-6 
4-8 
7-12 


BA 
BA 
BA 




Human Performance & 
Exercise Science 


38 


Physical Education 


K-12 


BA 


BS 


Language Arts 


33+ 


Elementary Education 
Middle Grades 


K-6 

4-8 


BA 
BA 




Language Arts-French 
Concentration 


33 


Elementary Education 

Middle Grades 

Secondary Education (French) 


K-6 
4-8 
7-12 


BA 
BA 
BA 




Language Arts-Spanish 
Concentration 


33 


Elementary Education 

Middle Grades 

Secondary Education (Spanish) 


K-6 
4-8 
7-12 


BA 
BA 
BA 




Mathematics 


30- 
36* 


Elementary Education 
Middle Grades 
Secondary Education 


K-6 
4-8 
7-12 


BA 


BS 
BS 
BS 


Music Education 


38 


Music (K-12 Instrumental) 


K-12 


BA 




Music Education 


38 


Music (K-12 Vocal) 


K-12 


BA 




Psychology 


36 


Secondary Education (Psych.) 


9-12 


BA 


BS 


Sociology 


30 


Secondary Education (Sociology) 


9-12 


BA 


BS 



* Pending Tennessee DOE approval (curricula available from Area Chair) 

Milligan College students may pursue initial professional teaching 
licensure in early childhood education (PreK-grade 3); elementary 
education (K-6); middle grades education (grades 4-8); secondary 
education (grades 7-12); K-12 specialization programs in music, physical 
education, and theatre; and special education (modified and 
comprehensive K-12). Milligan College has voluntarily suspended the 
special education licensure program due to limited demand for the 
program; new students will not be admitted until further notice. 
Licensure in other areas is available at either the undergraduate or the 
graduate level. 

In addition to the general education and licensure courses listed below, 
all undergraduate students pursuing teaching licensure must complete a 
Milligan College major in a field other than education. 



These courses and related experiences were developed by the Milligan 
College faculty in response to lists of required knowledge, skill, and 
disposition outcomes developed by the Tennessee Department of 
Education, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (NCATE), and the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and 
Support Consortium (INTASC). Verification of current CPR and/or 
first aid competency is required for student teaching. 

Early Childhood Education (PreK-3) 
licensure 

The early childhood education licensure program includes (1) general 
education courses, (2) the child and youth development major with an 
early childhood education emphasis, and (3) educational studies courses. 

Early childhood education students have as their academic advisers 
faculty members in teacher education. 

General Education Requirements (59 hrs) 

BIBL 123 Old Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 124 New Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 471 Christ and Culture (3 hrs) 

BIOL 110 General Biology (4 hrs) or BIOL 121 Environmental 

Science (4 hrs) 
COMM 120 Speech Communications (3 hrs) 
GEOG 202 Cultural and Ethnic Geography (3 hrs) 
HPXS 101 Fitness for Life (1 hr) and HXPS 208 Folk Dance and 

Rhythmical Activities (1 hr) 
HUMN'lOl Humanities (6 hrs) 
HUMN 102 Humanities (6 hrs) 
HUMN 201 Humanities (6 hrs) 
HUMN 202 Humanities (6 hrs) 
MATH 153 Fundamental Concepts (3 hrs) 
PHYS 104 Earth and Space Science (4 hrs) 
PSYC 100 introduction to College and Calling (1 hr) 
SOCL 201 Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) 

Additional General Education courses for Licensure (6 hrs) 
HIST 209 United States History Survey I (3 hrs) 
MATH 253 Fundamental Concepts (3 hrs) 

Child and Youth Development Major with Early Childhood 
Emphasis (34 hrs) 

See Child and Youth Development section of this catalog. 

Educational Studies (27 hrs) 

BIOL 350 Teaching Science to K-6 students (2 hrs) 

EDUC 152 Technology in Education (1 hr) 

EDUC 301 Introduction to Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education (3 hrs) 
EDUC 356 Reading Processes with Assessment and Intervention 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 452 Student Teaching Early Childhood (12 hrs) 
EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 
EDUC 475 Early Childhood Administration (2 hrs) 
HXPS 440 Health and Physical Education Methods (2 hrs) 

Verification of CPR and/or first aid competency that is current is 
required for student teaching. 



Elementary Education (K-6) licensure 

The elementary education licensure program includes (1) general 
education courses, (2) a major in a single discipline from the arts and 
sciences, and (3) educational studies courses. 

Elementary education students have as their academic advisers faculty 
members in teacher education and their chosen academic major. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



82 education: licensure 



General Education Requirements (65 hrs) 

BIBL 123 Old Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 124 New Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 471 Christ and Culture (3 hrs) 

BIOL 110 General Biology (4 hrs) or BIOL 121 Environmental 

Science (4 hrs) 
COMM 120 Speech Communications (3 hrs) 
GEOG 202 Cultural and Ethnic Geography (3 hrs) 
HPXS 101 Fitness for Life (1 hi) and HXPS 208 Folk Dance and 

Rhythmical Activities (1 hi) 
HUMN 101 Humanities (6 his) 
HUMN 102 Humanities (6 his) 
HUMN 201 Humanities (6 his) 
HUMN 202 Humanities (6 his) 
MATH 1 53 Fundamental Concepts (3 his) 
PHYS 104 Earth and Space Science (4 hrs) 
PSYC 100 Introduction to College and Calling (1 hr) 
SOCL 201 Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) 

Additional General Education Courses for Licensure (9 hrs) 
HIST 209 United States History Survey I (3 hrs) 
HIST 210 US History Survey II (3 hrs) 
MATH 253 Fundamental Concepts (3 hrs) 



Major in the Arts and Sciences (hours vary by major) 

Elementary education students may select a major in biology, chemistry, 
child and youth development (early childhood education emphasis), 
English, fine arts-art, history, humanities (concentrations available in 
English, French, history, and Spanish), language arts (concentrations 
available in French and Spanish), or mathematics. The number of 
credits required for each major varies; see the appropriate section of this 
catalog for the major requirements. 

Educational Studies (43 hrs) 

BIOL 350 Teaching Science to K-6 Students (2 hrs) 

EDUC 150 Introduction to Education (2 hrs) 

EDUC 152 Technology in Education (1 hr) 

EDUC 231 Psychology and Education of Exceptional Students 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 233 Child Guidance (2 hrs) 

EDUC 301 Introduction to Eaily Childhood and Elementary 
Education 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 355 Literacy Development (3 hrs) 
EDUC 356 Reading Processes with Assessment and Intervention 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 406 Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and 

Methods (3 his) 
EDUC 440 Creative Activities foi Children (3 hrs) 
EDUC 451 Student Teaching: Elementary (12 hrs) 
EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 
ENGL 354 Children's Literature (3 hrs) 
HPXS 440 Health and Physical Education Methods (2 hrs) 

Verification of CPR and/or first aid competency that is current is 
required for student teaching. 



Middle Grades Education licensure 

The middle education licensure program includes (1) general education 
courses; (2) a major in a single discipline from the arts and sciences; (3) 
an area of emphasis of at least twelve credits from the arts and sciences; 
and (4) educational studies courses. Note: to be qualified under the No 
Child Left Behind requirements, students must have (1) a major, (2) 24 
credits, or (3) pass the appropriate PRAXIS examinations to teach a 
subject in grades 7-8 in Tennessee. Middle grades education students 
have as their academic advisers faculty members in teacher education 



and their chosen academic major. 

General Education Requirements (59 hrs) 

BIBL 123 Old Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 124 New Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 471 Christ and Culture (3 hrs) 

BIOL 110 General Biology or 111 Principles of Biology (4 his) oi 

121 Environmental Science or CHEM 150 Chemistry and 

Society or CHEM 170 General Chemistry (4 hrs) 
COMM 1 02 Speech Communication (3 hrs) 
GEOG 202 Cultural and Ethnic Geography (3 hrs) 
HPXS 101 Fitness for Life (1 hr) and one hour of PE activities 

(lhr) 
HUMN 101 Humanities (6 hrs) 
HUMN 102 Humanities (6 hrs) 
HUMN 201 Humanities (6 hrs) 
HUMN 202 Humanities (6 hrs) 
One course from MATH 111 College Algebra I, 107 Principles of 

Mathematics, or 213 Statistics (3 hrs) 
PHYS 1 04 Earth and Space Science (4 hrs) 
PSYC 100 Introduction to College and Calling (1 hr) 
PYSC 253 Child Development (3 hrs) or 

PSYC 254 Adolescent Development (3 hrs) 
SOCL 201 Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) 

Additional general education courses for licensure (9 hrs) 
HIST 209 United States History Survey I (3 hrs) 
HIST 210 United States History Survey II (3 hrs) 
Additional math course from MATH 111 College Algebra I, 107 
Principles of Mathematics, or 213 Statistics (total of 3 hrs) 

Major in the Arts and Sciences (hours vary by major) 

Middle grades licensing requires a major in a single discipline from the 
aits and sciences. Individuals seeking middle giades licensure may select 
a major in biology, chemistry, English, history, humanities 
(concentrations available in English, French, German, history, Spanish), 
language arts (concentrations available in French or Spanish), or 
mathematics. The requirements for the majors listed above appear in 
other sections of this catalog. 

Area of Emphasis (12 credits) 

Middle grades licensing requires a major in a single discipline from the 
arts and sciences with an area of emphasis (at least twelve credits) in at 
least one discipline outside the major. Individuals seeking middle grades 
licensure may select an emphasis in biology, chemistry, English, French, 
German, history, humanities, language arts, mathematics, or Spanish. 

Educational Studies (46 hrs) 

EDUC 1 50 Introduction to Education (2 hrs) 

EDUC 1 52 Technology in Education (1 hr) 

EDUC 231 Psychology and Education of Exceptional Students 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 234 Classroom Management (2 hrs) 
EDUC 306 Middle Grades and Secondary Foundations (3 hrs) 
EDUC 355 Literacy Development (3 hrs) 
EDUC 356 Reading Processes with Assessment & Intervention 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 357 Content Area Reading (3 his) 
EDUC 408 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and Methods 

(5 hrs) 
EDUC 440 Creative Activities for Children (3 his) 
EDUC 453 Student Teaching: Middle Grades (12 hrs) 
EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 
ENGL 354 Children's Literature (3 hrs) 
HPXS 440 Health and Physical Education Methods (2 his) 
Verification of CPR and/or first aid competency' that is current is 
required for student teaching. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



education: licensure 83 



Secondary Education licensure 

The programs for licensure in secondary education are designed for 
persons interested in teaching in grades seven through twelve. 
Secondary licensure may be completed with the Bachelor of Science 
degree (selected majors) or the Bachelor of Arts degree (foreign 
language through the intermediate level required). Candidates 
completing the licensure program complete (1) general education 
courses; (2) an academic major; and (3) educational studies courses. The 
following are available secondary licensure areas: biology, business, 
business with technology, chemistry, English, French (language arts or 
humanities major), history, history with economics, mathematics, 
ps)'chology, sociology, and Spanish (language arts or humanities major). 

Secondary education students have as their academic advisers faculty 
members in teacher education and their chosen academic major. 

General Education Requirements (59 - 60 hrs) 

BIBL 123 Old Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 124 New Testament Survey (3 hrs) 

BIBL 471 Christ and Culture (3 hrs) 

BIOL 110 General Biology or BIOL 111 Principles of Biology or 
BIOL 121 Environmental Science or CHEM 150 Chemistry 
and Society or CHEM 1 70 General Chemistry I (4 hrs) 

COMM 102 Speech Communication (3 hrs) 

GEOG 202 Cultural and Ethnic Geography (3 hrs) 

HPXS 101 Fitness for Life (1 hr) and one hour of physical 
education activities (1 hr) 

HUMN 101 Humanities (6 hrs) 

HUMN 102 Humanities (6 his) 

HUMN 201 Humanities (6 hrs) 

HUMN 202 Humanities (6 hrs) 

Math course (3 or 4 hrs) 

PHYS 104 Earth and Space Science (4 hrs) 

PSYC 100 Introduction to College and Calling (1 hr) 

PSYC 254 Adolescent Development (3 hrs) 

SOCL 201 Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) 

Major (hours vary by major) 

Secondary licensing requires a major in the intended licensure area. 
Acceptable majors include biology, business administration, chemistry, 
English, French (language arts or humanities major), history, history 
with economics, history with government, mathematics, psychology, 
sociology, and Spanish (language arts or humanities major). See the 
appropriate pages of the catalog for descriptions of the requirements for 
each major. 

Educational Studies (32 hrs) 

EDUC 150 Introduction to Education (2 hrs) 

EDUC 152 Technology in Education (1 hr) 

EDUC 231 Psychology and Education of Exceptional Students 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 234 Classroom Management (2 hrs) 
EDUC 306 Middle Grades and Secondary Education Foundations 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 357 Content Area Reading (3 hrs) 
EDUC 408 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 

Methods (5 hrs) 
EDUC 454 Student Teaching: Secondary (1 2 hrs) 
EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 

Verification of CPR and/or first aid competency that is current is 
required for student teaching. 



K-12 Specialty licensure 

Milligan offers K-12 teacher education programs in physical education; 
music, vocal and general; music, instrumental; and theatre. Courses and 
curricula for these programs are listed in subsequent sections of this 
catalog. Students seeking teacher licensure are required to complete the 
courses listed below: 



Educational Studies 

K-12 licensure programs 



Course 


Music 


Phys. 


Ed. 


Theatre 


Education 150 


X 


X 




X 


Education 152 


X (or Music 211) 


X 




X 


Education 231 


X 






X 


Education 306 




X 




X 


Education 408 








X 


Education 455 


X 


X 




X 


Education 460 


X 


X 




X 



Psychology 253 XXX 

Verification of CPR and/or first aid competency that is current is 
required for student teaching. 

K-12 education students have as their academic advisers faculty 
members in teacher education and their chosen academic major. 



Special education licensure 

Milligan College has voluntarily suspended the special education licensure program 
due to limited demand from students; new students mill not be admitted until further 
notice. 

The Milligan College non-categorical special education curriculum has 
an emphasis in human development and learning. The curriculum 
combines the knowledge and skills required to meet the Tennessee 
Guidelines for Modified and Comprehensive Programs. Those who 
complete the program are prepared to teach children with both mild 
and severe disabilities in grades K-12. 

Psychology major/Special Education (39 hrs) 

Students seeking licensure in special education complete an 
undergraduate psychology major and required courses in education in 
preparation for the master of education degree. This psychology major 
includes the following courses: 

PSYC 250 General Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 252 Developmental Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 253 Child Development (3 hrs) 

PSYC 259 Research Methods in Psychology I (3 hrs) 

PSYC 350 Social Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 353 Theories of Personality (3 hrs) 

PSYC 357 Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Counseling 
(3 hrs) 

PSYC 358 Abnormal Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 359 Research and Methods in Psychology II (3 hrs) 

PSYC 401 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 422 Learning and Memory' (3 hrs) 

SOCL 201 Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) 

SOCL 303 Family (3 hrs) 

Special education students have as their academic advisers faculty 
members in psychology and teacher education. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



84 education: licensure 



Educational Studies (27 hrs) 

MATH 213 Statistics (3 hrs) 

MATH 253 Fundamental Concepts II (3 hrs) 

ENGL 354 Children's Literature (3 hrs) 

HPXS 406 Adapted Physical Education (2 hrs) 

EDUC 150 Introduction to Education (2 hrs) 

EDUC 152 Technology in Education (1 hr) 

EDUC 231 Psychology and Education of Exceptional Students 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 232 Early Childhood Intervention and Assessment (3 hrs) 
EDUC 355 Literacy Development (3 hrs) 
EDUC 356 Reading Processes with Assessment and Intervention 

(3 hrs) 

To complete the requirements for licensure, the student completes the 
M.Ed, initial licensure program in special education. 



Course Descriptions 

EDUC 150. Introduction to Education - An orientation to the 
education profession from the perspective of the teacher. The readings 
and discussions are designed to be an introduction to the current 
knowledge base related to teaching. Emphasis is given to the 
characteristics of the caring and reflective teacher. Students will begin a 
teacher education portfolio in this class. A beginning school- and 
community-based practicum with related seminars is the focus of the 
course. Offered every term. Two semester hours. 

EDUC 152. Technology in Education - Applications of technology 
for use in the PreK-12 classroom and for the teacher's record keeping 
and research. Offered even' term. One semester hour. 

EDUC 231. Psychology and Education of Exceptional Students - 

Education of exceptional students and the psychological aspects of 
exceptionalities. Includes discussion of assessment, family participation, 
IFSPs/IEPs, service deliver)' models, general curriculum, and 
intervention strategies. Includes observation and participation in 
classrooms with students with special needs. Offered fall term. Three 
semester hours. 

EDUC 233. Child Guidance - A study of skills and techniques for 
promoting positive behaviors in children birth through elementary age. 
Students learn how to manage routine situations related to care and 
education of children in a variety of professional settings from child 
development centers to elementary schools including the study of 
different approaches to classroom management. Field experience 
included. Offered fall term. Two semester hours. 

EDUC 234. Classroom Management. - A study of skills and 
techniques for managing middle school and secondary classrooms. 
Emphasis is on strategies that prevent discipline problems and promote 
positive student behaviors. Review of different approaches to classroom 
management and discipline. Emphasizes the positive child guidance 
theory and constructivist learning. The knowledge base includes 
Brophv, Deitz, Evertson, Canter, Glasser, Johnson and Johnson, 
Slaven, Walker. Field experiences included. Offered spring term each 
year. Two semester hours. 

EDUC 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the 
student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an 
individualized approach in a field not currendy covered in a single 
course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours. 



EDUC 301. Introduction to Early Childhood and Elementary 
Education - An overview of the education of children from birth 
through 12 years of age. History of the field, professional resources, 
educational models and theories, importance of working with families 
and appreciating diversity, and basics of developing curriculum. Field 
experience included. Offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

EDUC 306. Middle Grades and Secondary Foundations - History, 
philosophy, and social foundations of middle grades and secondary 
education. Included are examinations of middle grades and secondary 
organization and curriculum and an overview of assessment and 
instructional strategies. Developmental characteristics, learning styles, 
and typical interests and activities of pre-adolescents and adolescents are 
also explored. Field experience included. Offered fall term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

EDUC 355. Literacy Development - A study of how language with all 
its components develops and is nurtured to maturity. Emphasis is given 
to what brain research and learning research explain about learning, the 
language arts of listening, speaking, writing, spelling, reading, and 
thinking. Focus is on learning to use current methods and balanced 
strategies for assessing and teaching language and reading in the primary 
grades. Extensive field experience included. Enrollment limited to 
students admitted to the professional level of the teacher education 
program. Field experience included. Offered fall term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

EDUC 356. Reading Processes with Assessment and Intervention 

- A study of the diagnosis of reading skills and the objectives, methods, 
and materials for the correction of reading difficulties. Direct contact 
with children in tutorial and small group teaching situations is included. 
Enrollment limited to students admitted to the professional level of the 
teacher education program. Field experience included. Offered spring 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 357. Content Area Reading - A study of approaches and 
procedures designed to assist students in grades 4 - 12 in becoming 
adept readers. The primary focus will be on reading and language arts in 
the curriculum content areas. Building literacy development in students 
with both typical and atypical language skills is included. Techniques to 
modify and expand instruction based upon student development will be 
examined and discussed. Enrollment limited to students admitted to the 
professional level of the teacher education program. Field experience 
included. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 406. Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and 
Methods - A study of the educational needs of students in the cognitive 
realms of scientific, social, mathematical, and language learning. The 
focus is on planning and implementing a learning environment that 
provides hands-on discovery learning where the student is an active 
participant and decision-maker. Emphasis is given to the integration of 
the content areas, especially math, science, social studies, and the 
language arts. Field experience included. Offered fall term each year. 
Three credit hours. 

EDUC 408. Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 
Methods - A course preparing middle school and secondary education 
students to integrate and organize the knowledge of the disciplines to fit 
the particular needs of students. Emphasis on assessment, planning, 
instructional strategies, and evaluation. Includes individualized 
instruction by a content area specialist on materials and methods 
specific to licensing areas. Field experience included. Offered spring 
term each year. Five semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



education: licensure 85 



EDUC 440. Creative Activities for Children - A study of the role of 
creativity in the education of children and pre-adolescents. The course 
includes experience in planning and conducting appropriate art, music, 
movement, and creative drama activities for children birth through 1 4 
years of age. Field experience included. Offered spring term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

EDUC 443. Practicum - A supervised experience lasting for one 
semester or less in a program for children ages birth through seventeen. 
For child and youth development majors who are not seeking 
professional teaching licensure. Offered on demand. Three to six 
semester hours. 

EDUC 451. Student Teaching: Elementary - An experience in lesson 
planning, instruction, and assessment, Grades K-6. An extensive 
orientation prepares the student for student teaching experience (fifteen 
weeks) that includes the refinement of planning, instruction, and 
assessment skills in the classroom setting. Approval to student teach 
required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar 
required. Offered ever}' term. Three, six, twelve semester hours. 

EDUC 452. Student Teaching: Early Childhood - An experience in 
lesson planning, instruction, and assessment, grades PreK-3. An 
extensive orientation prepares the student for student teaching 
experience (fifteen weeks) that includes the refinement of planning, 
instruction, and assessment skills in the classroom setting. Approval to 
student teach required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 460 Capstone 
Seminar required. Offered every term. Three, six, twelve semester 
hours. 

EDUC 453. Student Teaching: Middle Grades - An experience in 
lesson planning, instruction, and assessment for grades 4-8. An 
extensive orientation prepares the student for a student teaching 
experience (typically fifteen weeks) that includes the refinement of 
planning, instruction, and assessment skills in the classroom setting. 
Approval to student teach required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 
460 Capstone Seminar required. Offered every term. Three, six, twelve 
semester hours. 



EDUC 455. Student Teaching: K-12 - An experience in lesson 
planning, instruction, and assessment for grades K-12. An extensive 
orientation prepares the student for a student teaching experience 
(typically fifteen weeks) in K-12 specialty programs that includes the 
refinement of planning, instruction, and assessment skills in the 
classroom setting. Approval to student teach is required. Concurrent 
enrollment in EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar required. Offered every 
term. Three, six, twelve semester hours. 

EDUC 456. Teaching Practicum - A supervised practicum in lesson 
planning, instruction, and assessment for grades PreK-12. Designed for 
post-baccalaureate students seeking an additional endorsement or 
interim license. Does not substitute for student teaching. Offered on 
demand. Three, six, twelve semester hours. 

EDUC 460. Capstone Seminar - A capstone seminar designed to 
promote reflection, in-depth discussion, and collaborative action 
research. Designed to integrate all elements of the program, document 
program outcomes in the candidate portfolio, and verify program 
completion. Also includes topical presentations by Milligan and partner 
school faculty. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the 
professional level of the teacher education program and approved to 
student teach. Co-requisite with student teaching. Offered every term. 
One semester hour. 

EDUC 475. Early Childhood Administration - A studv of the 
philosophy, organization, and components of developmentally 
appropriate early childhood programs. Administration, environmental 
aspects, staff development, and financial management of programs are 
examined. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours. 

EDUC 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of reading 
and research that provides for study of material not included in the 
regular course offerings. One to three semester hours. 

EDUC 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and 
conferences that provides for individualized study. One to three 
semester hours. 



EDUC 454. Student Teaching: Secondary - An experience in lesson 
planning, instruction, and assessment for grades 7-12. An extensive 
orientation prepares the student for a student teaching experience 
(typically fifteen weeks) that includes the refinement of planning, 
instruction, and assessment skills in the classroom setting. Approval to 
student teach required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 460 Capstone 
Seminar required. Offered every term. Three, six, twelve semester 
hours. 



EDUC 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depfh 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. One to three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



86 education (M.Ed.) 



Education: 

Master of Education 

Program (M.Ed.) 

Area of Education 

Initial Licensure 

The master of education (M.Ed.) program includes both initial licensure 
and advanced degree options. The initial licensure degree is typically a 
fifteen-month professional educational program that prepares teachers 
for the high level of competence expected by public and private 
educational institutions. The initial licensure and advanced programs 
increase both the quality and quantity of the educational experiences for 
teachers in professional education. 

The M.Ed, initial licensure program is designed for students who have a 
baccalaureate degree with a strong general education component and 
one or more specialty or endorsement areas (or majors). This program 
consists of 45 to 47 semester hours. Available areas of licensure are 
essentially the same as those listed above for the undergraduate 
education program. Candidates may finish the M.Ed, program in two 
summers and one academic year (i.e. fifteen months). Students may also 
choose to extend course work beyond the typical fifteen-month period. 

The master of education initial licensure program supports the 
following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their 
ability to read and think analytically and critically, to 
communicate clearly and effectively, to evidence knowledge 
and competencies in the liberal arts and the natural and social 
sciences, and to understand a significant body of material in 
their major fields of study. 

■ Students will demonstrate social responsibility in numerous 
ways, such as serving in churches, on the mission field 
(domestic and foreign), and with social agencies; mentoring, 
nurturing, and protecting others; and displaying increased 
understanding of and experience with other cultures. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through 
awareness of health issues, appreciation for the arts and 
sciences, stewardship of resources, and preparation for 
graduate studies and a rewarding career or profession. 

The primary goal of the M.Ed, program at Milligan College is to 
produce caring and reflective professional educators who will affect the 
lives of children in a markedly positive manner. Specific student 
outcomes for the initial licensure program, based upon standards of the 
Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium 
(INTASC), are as follows: (1) The teacher candidate understands the 
central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he 
or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these 
aspects of subject matter meaningful for students; (2) The teacher 
candidate understands how children learn and develop and can provide 
learning opportunities that support children's intellectual, social, and 
personal development; (3) The teacher candidate understands how 
students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional 
opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners; (4) The teacher 
candidate understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to 
encourage students' development of critical thinking, problem solving, 
and performance skills; (5) The teacher candidate uses an understanding 
of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning 
environment that encourages positive social interaction, active 
engagement in learning, and self-motivation; (6) The teacher candidate 



uses knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media 
communication techniques to foster active inquirv, collaboration, and 
supportive interaction in the classroom; (7) The teacher candidate plans 
instruction based upon the knowledge of subject matter, students, the 
community, and curriculum goals; (8) The teacher candidate 
understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to 
evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual and social development 
of the learner; (9) The teacher candidate is a reflective practitioner who 
continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on 
others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning 
community) and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow 
professionally; (10) The teacher candidate fosters relationships with 
school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to 
support students' learning and well-being; (11) The teacher candidate 
combines Christian values, knowledge, and interpersonal skills to reflect 
the attributes of a Christian educator, ensuring maximum group and 
individual learning. 

Portfolio 

Students in all graduate degree licensure-seeking programs are required 
to develop an electronic portfolio documenting their mastery of 
applicable Milligan College graduate program outcomes. Initial and 
continuing candidacy status is contingent upon periodic review of 
developing portfolios. Students completing degree requirements in Mav 
or July must submit the completed portfolio in LiveText by the last 
Mondav in April. Students completing degree requirements in 
December must submit the completed portfolio to CASE by the last 
Monday in November. Students failing to meet this deadline will not 
receive a passing grade in Education 560 Advanced Capstone Seminar 
until the portfolio requirement is fully met. Portfolio development and 
review will continue through the spring semester. 

Financial Information 

Graduate tuition is S305 per semester hour for the 2006-2007 academic 
year. A non-refundable application fee of S30.00 is required with the 
application. Modest student fees accompany certain courses in the 
program. Students will also incur modest expenses for formal testing 
required for admission to the program (MAT or GRE) and licensure 
(PRAXIS II), liability insurance, and verification of CPR and/or first aid 
proficiency. For information regarding financial aid, please refer to the 
financial aid section of the catalog. 



Admission to the Graduate School 

Unconditional Admission 

The minimum requirements for unconditional admission to the M.Ed, 
program are as follows: 

1 . An undergraduate degree with a minimum overall undergraduate 
grade point average of at least 2.75. An applicant whose 
baccalaureate degree is from an institution not accredited bv a 
regional accrediting association or the American Association of 
Bible Colleges may be required by the Academic Dean or Director 
of Teacher Certification to submit additional materials and 
information for consideration by the college. 

2. An established minimum score on the Miller Analogies Test (35th 
percentile, National Norms) or the Graduate Record Examination 
(750 combined verbal and quantitative scores) or equivalent score 
on another widely accepted measure. 

3. Two official transcripts from each institution attended showing all 
credits and degrees previously earned. 

4. Two completed reference forms from faculty members or other 
persons who have adequate knowledge of the applicant's Christian 
commitment and character and potential for success as a graduate 
student and professional educator. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



education (M.Ed.) 87 



5. Evidence of written language competency through an established 
examination process. 

6. Evidence of competency in technology through an established 
examination process. 

7. A positive recommendation from the Graduate Admissions 
Committee based upon a review of the application file and an 
admissions interview. 

Students who do not meet the above requirements may be admitted in 
one of the following categories: 

Conditional Admission 

The minimum requirements for conditional admission are as follows: 

1 . An undergraduate degree with a minimum overall undergraduate 
grade point average of 2.5. An applicant whose baccalaureate 
degree is from a program not accredited by a regional accrediting 
association or the American Association of Bible Colleges may be 
required by the Academic Dean or Director of Teacher 
Certification to submit additional materials and information for 
consideration by the college. 

2. A Miller Analogies Test score above the 25th percentile or a 
Graduate Record Examination score above 650 (combined verbal 
and quantitative scores). 

3. Two official transcripts from each institution attended showing all 
credits and degrees previously earned. 

4. Two completed reference forms from faculty members or other 
persons who have adequate knowledge of the applicant's Christian 
commitment and character and potential for success as a graduate 
student and professional educator. 

5. Conditional admission may be changed to unconditional admission 
if the student achieves a grade point average of 3.0 on the first 
nine hours of Milligan College graduate study. 

6. Evidence of written language competency through an established 
examination process. 

7. Evidence of competency in technology through an established 
examination process. 

8. A positive recommendation from the Graduate Admissions 
Committee based upon a review of the application file and an 
admissions interview. 

Special Enrollment 

This status is designed for a student whose goal is to be accepted into 
the M.Ed, program as degree seeking, licensure only, or additional 
endorsement but who does not meet the admissions standards (e.g. 
youthful college GPA). The Graduate Admissions Committee requires 
at least conditional admission status for the student to enter the 
licensure seeking status. A student in this circumstance may enter as a 
special student to complete no more than fifteen (15) hours with at least 
a 3.0 grade point average while he or she is seeking conditional or 
unconditional admission status with the college. The student must 
submit a completed application, a letter requesting special student status 
and two full sets of transcripts to the Graduate Admissions Office. 
When this student is qualified for either conditional or unconditional 
admission, the student may re-enter the admissions process and the 
Graduate Admissions Committee will act on the request for admissions. 
This status enables a student to enroll for graduate credit, but it does 
not guarantee that such credit will be counted toward degree objectives. 
When a student in special enrollment status has been reclassified to 
conditional or unconditional admission at Milligan College, a maximum 
of nine semester hours of special enrollment credit may be counted 



toward a degree objective unless otherwise approved by the Committee. 
Students enrolled under this special status are not eligible to receive 
federal financial aid. 

Transient Enrollment 

Transient enrollment may be granted to students who are enrolled in 
another graduate program or who are seeking professional 
development. Each applicant must provide the Graduate Admissions 
Office with a completed application for admission and official college 
transcripts. Students who are enrolled in another graduate program 
must also supply a letter of approval from the dean or registrar of the 
student's home institution. 

Graduate Admissions Committee 

Admission to the program is determined by the Graduate Admissions 
Committee, which is composed of teacher education faculty and three 
non-teacher education faculty. The academic dean makes all 
appointments to the M.Ed. Graduate Admissions Committee. 

Admission to Candidacy 

The Progression and Retention Committee will determine admission to 
candidacy after the completion of at least nine hours. The student may 
not be permitted to register for subsequent course work until admission 
to candidacy is approved. Admission to candidacy also provides 
approval for internship placement. The requirements that must be met 
before approval of admission to candidacy are as follows: 

1. Achievement of unconditional admission by the Admissions 
Committee. 

2. Completion of at least nine semester hours of graduate credit at 
Milligan College including at least 6 credit hours of methods 
courses with a minimum grade point average of 3.0. 

3. Positive recommendation from all faculty from whom courses 
have been taken. 

4. Completion of undergraduate requirements for teacher licensure 
(or equivalent) as follows: 

Early childhood education: a basic pattern of liberal arts courses 
to assure licensure (two courses in language or literature; two 
courses in social studies; two courses in science [with labs]; and 
two courses in math); 



OR 



OR 



Elementary education: a basic pattern of liberal arts courses to 
assure licensure (two courses in language or literature; two courses 
in social studies; two courses in science [with labs]; and two 
courses in math); 

Middle grades education: (1) a basic pattern of liberal arts 
courses to assure licensure (two courses in language or literature; 
two courses in social studies; two courses in science [with labs]; 
and two courses in math); (2) a major in a single discipline from 
the arts and sciences with an area of emphasis (approximately 10% 
of the undergraduate curriculum) in at least one additional 
discipline outside the major; 

Secondary education: (1) basic pattern of liberal arts courses to 
assure licensure; (2) specific courses in endorsement areas to assure 
content competency consisting of at least 24 hours that are die 
equivalent of a major in that area (See Page 81 for a list of 
licensure programs available). 



Retention Standards and Probationary Status 

When a student's cumulative average on courses applied toward die 
graduate degree falls below 3.0, the student may be permitted one 
semester of probationary standing in which to raise the average 
sufficiendy. If the semester average on all courses taken during any 



OR 



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88 education (M.Ed. 



semester falls below 2.75, the Progression and Retention Committee 
will review the student's record for possible dismissal from the M.Ed, 
program. Students earning C or below in six or more hours of credit 
will be considered by the Progression and Retention Committee for 
possible probation or dismissal. Probationary status may also result 
from behaviors and/or dispositions considered as unprofessional, 
including but not limited to absenteeism, tardiness, interpersonal 
conflict, unacceptable dispositions, or disrespectful behavior directed 
toward peers, colleagues, school personnel, or children. Behavior also 
must be consistent with the Milligan College Mission Statement and 
Goals. 

Appeals and Reinstatement 

A student who is dismissed may be reinstated upon recommendation of 
the teacher education faculty. Reinstatement is not automatic. The 
student must consult with the Progression and Retention Committee 
chair, who will submit a recommendation to the area chair for a 
decision by the teacher education faculty. Appeals may be made on 
dismissal, denial of reinstatement, or any issue related to master of 
education program requirements. The student must submit a written 
petition to the Progression and Retention Committee chair requesting 
reconsideration of the decision. The student will be notified when the 
petition will be brought before the teacher education faculty and will 
have an opportunity to appear in person. The student will be promptly 
notified in writing of the faculty's decision. 

Licensure Programs (non-degree) 

A student with a baccalaureate degree who is seeking teacher licensure 
must be admitted to the initial licensure graduate program. The student 
can prepare for licensure by completing courses that lead to a M.Ed, 
degree with the exception of the research courses (EDUC 511, 512, 
513) or by completing a carefully planned licensure program that does 
not result in a degree. The Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record 
Examination is waived for licensed teachers who enter the graduate 
advanced licensure program for the sole purpose of adding 
endorsements and are not seeking the degree. Licensed teachers adding 
endorsements for a different grade level may be required to complete a 
teaching practicum at the new endorsement level. All students pursuing 
degree completion must meet candidacy requirements noted above. 
Completion of the Milligan program of study does not guarantee 
licensure or graduation. Milligan College will recommend for licensure 
or graduation any teacher candidate who has failed to meet minimum 
passing Tennessee approved scores on all required PRAXIS II tests and 
subtests. 

Licensure Examinations (PRAXIS II) 

Students who have not taken the PRAXIS II "Principles of Learning 
and Teaching" and appropriate Specialty Area Examinations must 
complete these examinations during their program(s) of study. Due to 
limited annual test dates, students are urged to complete required testing 
as early as possible in their programs of study. Based upon the 
assumption that academic content has already been mastered in the 
student's baccalaureate degree program, it is recommended that all 
required Specialty Area Examinations be completed no later than 
November. Milligan College cannot recommend licensure for any 
candidate who has failed to attain Tennessee approved scores on all 
required licensure tests. Candidates will not be considered program 
completers until minimum scores have been attained on all required 
licensure tests. A passing grade will not be awarded in EDUC 560 
Advanced Capstone Seminar until all minimum scores are met. Failure 
to pass the Capstone Seminar will also delay graduation until acceptable 
test scores are achieved. 

In accordance with the United States Congress in the reauthorization of 
Title II of the Higher Education Act, the Milligan College Teacher 
Education Program reports PRAXIS II pass rates for 2004-2005 
program completers. 



One hundred percent of the graduates passed all the PRAXIS II exams 
they took for initial teacher licensure. Aggregate pass rates for 2005- 
2006 were: 

Professional Knowledge 100% 

Academic Content 100% 

Transfer Credit 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate credit in acceptable areas 
of study may be considered by the Graduate Admissions Committee for 
transfer from other approved institutions to the Milligan College M.Ed, 
degree program. 

Enrollment of Undergraduates in Graduate Courses or 
Graduate Students in Undergraduate Courses 

Graduate students or undergraduate students at the junior and senior 
level may choose to take courses at the graduate or undergraduate level 
in areas which are comparable and are supported by the students' 
academic adviser. 

Up to nine hours of undergraduate work beyond the minimum 1 28 
hours of undergraduate requirements may be taken for graduate credit 
and applied toward the Master of Education degree program. 

Time Limits for Completion of Requirements 

A graduate student in the M.Ed, program must complete all degree 
requirements within an eight-year period. A successful appeal of this 
limitation may result in an extension of one, two, or three semesters 
granted by the teacher education faculty upon the recommendation of 
the student's graduate adviser and the director of teacher certification. 

Grade Requirements for Graduation 

Students must achieve a 3.0 overall grade point average on required 
course work to be eligible for graduation. The minimum grade for all 
graduate program course work is C-. No more than two grades below 
B- can be counted toward graduation requirements. 

Research Project 

Students complete a research project that begins in Education 51 1 
Research Methods in Education. The project features action research 
related to the school setting of the internship assignment. Research 
topics are developed collaboratively with Milligan faculty and partner 
school personnel. Designated checkpoints are established for students 
to report on their research projects. Results of the research are 
presented in a seminar near the end of the student's graduate program. 

Internship 

Graduate students in initial licensure programs must complete EDUC 
551 Internship I and EDUC 552 Internship II. This two-semester 
practicum in teaching, assessment, and classroom management provides 
sustained supervised experience in classrooms of community partner 
schools, working direcdy with master teachers as mentors. Intern 
experience placements will be made with partner school systems located 
near Milligan College in order to maintain proper supervision levels and 
the integrity of our Teacher Education Program. Placement in at least 
two grade levels is required for each licensure area. Students are not 
eligible for placement in the internship until prerequisite academic 
content and methodology courses are completed. The internship 
experience is also evaluated by Milligan College and school system 
personnel using the Tennessee Framework for Professional 
Development and Evaluation. This year of "apprenticeship" is counted 
as the first year of teaching experience toward professional licensure 
status in Tennessee. Each student must also complete a co-requisite 
advanced capstone seminar (EDUC 560) during each semester of the 
internship. A critical component of the capstone seminars is the 
verification of program outcomes through successful completion of the 
portfolio in LiveText and all required licensure examinations. Modest 
stipends often accompany the internship experience. 



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education (M.Ed.) 89 



Graduate Course Load 

The normal course load for full-time students in the M.Ed, program is 
nine to twelve hours per semester. In certain cases, the dean and the 
director of teacher education may approve a fifteen-hour load for 
exceptional students. The maximum course load per four-week summer 
session is 7 hours. 



Six Curricula 

In addition to the core courses listed below, the six curricula that lead to 
the M.Ed, degree and initial licensure include the early childhood 
program, elementary program, middle grades program, the secondary 
program, the special education program, and the K-12 specialty 
programs in physical education, theatre, or music. These programs 
require 45 to 47 hours of graduate credit. Each curriculum described 
below may be completed in one academic year and two summers (15 
months). 

Core courses for all curricula (25 hrs) 

(required for each initial licensure program) 

EDUC 511 Research Methods in Education (3 hrs) 

EDUC 512 Research Seminar (2 hrs) 

EDUC 513 Scholarly Writing (1 hr) 

EDUC 551 Internship I (5 hrs) 

EDUC 552 Internship II (6 hrs) 

EDUC 560a Advanced Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 

EDUC 560b Advanced Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 

EDUC 562 Seminar in Middle Grades and Secondary Foundations 

OR 
EDUC 571 Early Childhood and Elementary Foundations (3 hrs) 
EDUC 573 Advanced Child Development and Learning (3 hrs) 

Curricula 

Early Childhood Education courses (22 hrs) 

EDUC 540 Health and Physical Education Methods (2 hrs) 
EDUC 541 Integrating the Arts into Curriculum (2 hrs) 
EDUC 544 Advanced Children's Literature (3 hrs) 
EDUC 575 Advanced Early Childhood Administration (3 hrs) 
EDUC 576 Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and 

Methods (3 hrs) 
EDUC 577 Language Arts and Reading (3 hrs) 
EDUC 579 Children with Special Needs (3 hrs) 
EDUC elective (3 hrs) 

Elementary Education courses (22 hrs) 

EDUC 540 Health and Physical Education Methods (2 hrs) 
EDUC 541 Integrating the Arts into Curriculum (2 hrs) 
EDUC 544 Advanced Children's Literature (3 hrs) 
EDUC 576 Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and 

Methods (3 hrs) 
EDUC 577 Language Arts and Reading (3 hrs) 
EDUC 579 Children with Special Needs (3 hrs) 
EDUC 621 Assessment and Evaluation (3 hrs) 
EDUC elective (3 hrs) 

Middle Grades Education courses (20 hrs) 

EDUC 520 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and Methods 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 521 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 

Methods II (Content Areas) (3 hrs) 
EDUC 523 Models of Teaching (3 hrs) 
EDUC 527 Content Area Reading 

OR 
EDUC 577 Language Arts and Reading (3 hrs) 
EDUC 530 Education of Exceptional Students (3 hrs) 
EDUC 541 Integrating the Arts into Curriculum (2 hrs) 
EDUC elective (3 hrs) 



Secondary Education courses (21 hrs) 

EDUC 520 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and Methods 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 521 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 
Methods II 

(Content Areas) (3 hrs) 
EDUC 523 Models of Teaching (3 hrs) 
EDUC 527 Content Area Reading (3 hrs) 
EDUC 530 Education of Exceptional Students (3 hrs) 
EDUC electives (6 hrs) 

K-12 Music, Theatre, and Physical Education courses 
(21 hrs*) 

EDUC 520 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 

Methods (3 hrs) 
EDUC 521 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 
Methods II 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 523 Models of Teaching (3 hrs) 
EDUC 527 Content Area Reading (3 hrs) 
EDUC 530 Education of Exceptional Students (3 hrs) 
EDUC electives* (6 hrs) 

*An elementary level (K-6) methodology course in the major is 
also required for licensure. 

Special Education courses (21 hrs) 

Milligan College has voluntarily suspended the special education 

program due to limited demand; no new students will be enrolled 

in this program until further notice. 

EDUC 527 Content Area Reading (3 hrs) 

EDUC 530 Education of Exceptional Students (3 hrs) 

EDUC 577 Language Arts and Reading (3 hrs) 

EDUC 582 Characteristics of Exceptional Children (3 hrs) 

EDUC 583 Educational Procedures for Exceptional Children 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 584 Child Who is Mentally Retarded (3 hrs) 
EDUC 585 Child Who is Multiply Handicapped (3 hrs) 



Advanced degree 



The M.Ed, advanced program is designed for licensed teachers who 
teach at the early childhood, elementary, middle grades, or secondary 
level and who wish to develop professionally. The advanced program 
increases both the quality and quantity of the educational experiences 
for teachers in professional education. Students may finish the 36-hour 
advanced degree program in two years, including fall, spring, and 
summer courses. Students may also choose to extend course work 
beyond the typical two-year period. 

The advanced degree master of education program supports the 
following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in dieir major fields of study. 

■ Students will demonstrate social responsibility in numerous ways, 
such as serving in churches, on the mission field (domestic and 
foreign), and with social agencies; mentoring, nurturing, and 
protecting others; and displaying increased understanding of and 
experience with other cultures. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both die arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 



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90 education (M.Ed. 



Student outcomes for the advanced licensure program are based upon 
the following principles of the National Board for Professional Teacher 
Standards (NBPTS): (1) Teachers are committed to learning; (2) 
Teachers know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects 
to students; (3) Teachers are responsible for managing and monitoring 
student learning; (4) Teachers think systematically about their practice 
and learn from experience; (5) Teachers are members of learning 
communities; (6) Teachers combine Christian values, knowledge, and 
interpersonal skills to reflect the attributes of a Christian educator, 
ensuring maximum group and individual learning. 

The program integrates theory, action research, and reflective practice. 
Program outcomes are based upon National Board for Professional 
Teacher Standards (NBPTS) and are documented in professional 
portfolios. 

The 36 credit hour advanced master of education program consists of a 
24 credit hour core and 12 elective credits. Participants may also add an 
additional endorsement concurrent with their enrollment in the 
program. Additional endorsements may require more than twelve 
elective credits, however. 

Program Characteristics and Curriculum 

Application, admission, and retention policies and procedures for the 
advanced degree program are parallel to those noted above for the 
initial licensure M.Ed, program. Comprehensive examination 
procedures are also parallel. The advanced degree curriculum consists of 
core courses, research, and electives as follows: 

Core courses (18 hrs) 

EDUC 621 Assessment and Evaluation (3 hrs) 
EDUC 622 Classroom Management (3 hrs) 
EDUC 626 Mentorship (3 hrs) 
EDUC 631 Family and Community Culture (3 hrs) 
EDUC 662 School Organization and Law (3 hrs) 
EDUC 670 Professional Teacher Standards (3 hrs) 

Research (6 hrs) 

EDUC 51 1 Research Methods in Education (3 hrs) 
EDUC 512 Research Seminar (2 hrs) 
EDUC 513 Scholarly Writing (1 hi) 

Electives (12 hrs) 

Twelve hours of elective course work are required for degree 
completion. Electives may be selected from graduate courses 
offered in the initial licensure program. Students are encouraged to 
select electives based upon a professional growth plan. An 
additional endorsement may be a part of this plan. Below are the 
suggested elective courses by area: 

Licensed ECE or Elementary Teachers 

EDUC 532 Counseling of Children and Families (3 hrs) 
EDUC 544 Advanced Children's Literature (3 hrs) 
EDUC 565 Technology' in Education (3 hrs) 
EDUC 572 Advanced Child Guidance* (3 hrs) 
EDUC 573 Advanced Child Development and Learning 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 575 Advanced Earlv Childhood Administration* 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 576 Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and 

Methods* (3 hrs) 
EDUC 577 Language Arts and Literacy* (3 hrs) 
EDUC 579 Children with Special Needs (3 hrs) 
* Required for those adding PreK-3 endorsement to elementary 
licensure. 



Methods II (Content Areas) (3 hrs) 
EDUC 523 Models of Teaching (3 hrs) 
EDUC 532 Counseling of Children and Families (3 hrs) 
EDUC 540 Health and Physical Education Methods* (2 hrs) 
EDUC 565 Technology in Education (3 hrs) 
EDUC 573 Advanced Child Development and Learning 

(3 hrs) 
*Required for those adding Middle Grades (4-8) endorsement to 
PreK-3 license. 

Licensed Secondary Teachers 

EDUC 520 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 

Methods (3 hrs) 
EDUC 521 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 

Methods II (Content Areas) (3 hrs) 
EDUC 523 Models of Teaching (3 hrs) 
EDUC 532 Counseling of Children and Families (3 hrs) 
EDUC 538 Teaching English Language Learners (3 hrs) 
EDUC 565 Technology in Education (3 hrs) 
EDUC 573 Advanced Child Development and Learning 

(3 hrs) 



Course Descriptions 

EDUC 511. Research Methods in Education - The role of inquiry in 
education and an overview of educational research methods and design. 
Study of problem solving, research methods, research design, and basic 
data analysis procedures used in experimental, quasi-experimental, 
descriptive, and qualitative research. Completion of a research 
prospectus, literature review, research design, and instrumentation for a 
research project. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 512. Research Seminar - Completion of the research study 
begun in Education 511. Students discuss types of data, appropriate 
data analysis procedures, published research, and principles of research 
interpretation. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours. 

EDUC 513. Scholarly Writing - Each candidate reports on his or her 
own research findings, explores subsequent publication, and reflects 
upon applications of research in the classroom and school. Offered May 
and summer term each year. One semester hour. 

EDUC 520. Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 
Methods - Study of strategies for designing and implementing 
curriculum in the middle grades and secondary school including 
assessment, unit and lesson planning, and styles of instruction. Material 
is developed into strategies for classroom practice. Offered summer 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 521. Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 
Methods II (Content Areas) - A study of current curriculum and 
teaching strategies used in specific teaching disciplines. Continuation of 
EDUC 520 with assistance from content area specialists. Offered 
summer term each year. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 522. Preschool - Early Primary Curriculum — A study of 
planning and implementing curricula for children — 8 years of age in 
private and public school settings. This study includes a review of State 
of Tennessee early childhood standards and professional standards for 
developmentallv appropriate practice for young children. The course 
includes the study of different early childhood education curriculum 
models along with the review and application of current research on 
pre-literacy and pre-mafhematics in designing early childhood 
curriculum. Offered as needed. Three semester hours. 



Licensed Middle Grades or Elementary Teachers 

EDUC 520 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 

Methods* (3 hrs) 
EDUC 521 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and 



EDUC 523. Models of Teaching - A study of a variety of approaches 
to teaching designed to give teachers a broad repertoire of teaching 
skills that will enable students to become more effective learners and 
bring about particular kinds of learning. Also included is an examination 
of the new technologies available in education. Offered summer term 



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education (M.Ed.) 91 



each year. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 524. Intermediate Curriculum - An intensive study of the 
fifth and sixth grade curriculum based on the State of Tennessee 
Blueprint for Learning. The focus is on planning and implementing 
curriculum standards to help provide hands-on discovery learning 
where the student is an active participant, problem-solver, and decision- 
maker. Candidates learn how to use assessment to plan for instruction 
in a fifth or sixth grade classroom. The course content introduces the 
rationale and research on the major models of teaching and applies the 
models by using scenarios and examples of instructional materials. The 
course provides substantial support to a "reflective teaching" or 
constructivist approach. Descriptions of multi-model curricula and 
studies of their effects are explored. Offered as needed. Three semester 
hours. 

EDUC 525. Structure of the Curriculum - A study of current trends 
in curriculum development, including curriculum integration. 
Candidates learn how to define objectives, plan for improvement, and 
organize instructional materials. An elective in licensed teacher 
programs. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 527. Content Area Reading - A study of approaches and 
procedures designed to assist students in grades 4-12 in becoming adept 
readers. The primary focus is on reading and language arts in the 
curriculum content areas. Guiding literacy development in students with 
both typical and atypical language skills is included. Techniques to 
modify and expand instruction based on student development are 
examined and discussed. Offered fall and summer terms each year. 
Three semester hours. 

EDUC 529. Teaching Mathematics - A study of the presentation of 
calculation skills and applied mathematics problem-solving appropriate 
to the elementary schools. Remediation strategies are included. Offered 
occasionally. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 530. Education of Exceptional Students - A study of the 
applications of educational theories and research related to the 
instruction of students with special needs. Topics include student 
characteristics, motivation, instruction, evaluation, and procedures for 
special education referrals. Offered spring and summer terms each year. 
Three semester hours. 

EDUC 532. Counseling of Children and Families - A study of 
counseling principles important to teachers as they interact with 
children and their families. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 538. Teaching English Language Learners — A study of the 
characteristics of children who are English Language Learners (ELL), of 
the assessment of their literacy skills, and of literacy intervention 
strategies based on a review of the literature pertaining to ELL 
instruction. Relevant topics include: establishing a classroom 
environment that is positive and welcoming for the English language 
learner; establishing routines; communicating with ELL students; using 
simple sign language; using whole group strategies; guiding written 
expression; establishing a buddy system and peer tutoring; organizing 
volunteer programs. The course provides support to a "reflective and 
caring" teacher of English language learners. Offered as needed. Three 
semester hours. 

EDUC 540. Health and Physical Education Methods - Reading and 
discussion of fitness and health concerns of children. The course includes 
instruction and practice related to physical activity and rhythmical 
activities. Emphasis is on integration of health and physical education 
topics and activities into the curriculum. Offered spring term each year. 
Two semester hours. 



integrating art, music, drama, and dance with other subject areas. The 
use of the arts to explore and understand other people and cultures and 
to build positive attitudes toward self and others is included. Offered 
spring term each year. Two semester hours. 

EDUC 544. Advanced Children's Literature - An in-depth study of 
children's literature, infancy through adolescence. Emphasis is on 
criteria for planning, presenting, and evaluating a quality literature 
program to provide rich literary experiences, grades Pre-Kindergarten - 
grade 8. Candidates compare and contrast literary contributions from all 
genres of literature. Offered spring or summer term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

EDUC 551. Internship I - A full-day, full-semester, school-based 
professional growth experience. In addition to a specific teaching 
assignment, the student may have observations of various school 
situations, emphasizing diversity, exceptionality, and rural and urban 
settings. Some experiences to develop psychological readiness for the 
profession are included. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 560 
Advanced Capstone Seminar required. Offered fall term each year. Five 
semester hours. 

EDUC 552. Internship II - A full-day, full-semester, school-based 
professional growth experience. A continuation of the internship 
involving greater responsibility in the teaching assignment. Concurrent 
enrollment in EDUC 560 Advanced Capstone Seminar required. 
Offered spring term each year. Six semester hours. 

EDUC 553. Teaching Practicum - A supervised practicum in lesson 
planning, instruction, and assessment for grades PreK-12. Designed for 
post-baccalaureate students seeking an additional endorsement or 
interim license. Offered on demand. Three, six, twelve semester hours. 

EDUC 560a/b. Advanced Capstone Seminar - A capstone seminar 
designed to promote reflection, in-depth discussion, and collaborative 
action research. Designed to integrate all elements of the program and 
document program outcomes in the candidate portfolio. Also includes 
topical presentations by Milligan and partner school faculty. Enrollment 
limited to students enrolled concurrently in EDUC 551 and 552 
Internship. Will be repeated once for credit. Offered fall and spring 
terms each year. One semester hour. 

EDUC 562. Seminar in Middle Grades and Secondary 
Foundations - A survey of the historical, philosophical, legal, and 
social foundations of middle and secondary school education in the 
United States. Offered summer term. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 563. Advanced Educational Psychology - A study of the 
application of psychological theories and research to classroom setting. 
Topics include student characteristics, mental health, personality, 
learning theories, group dynamics, motivation, and evaluation with a 
focus on social constructivist theory. Offered occasionally. Three 
semester hours. 

EDUC 565. Technology in Education - A study of applications of 
technology to instruction of children in PreK-12 schools and to the 
maintenance of records and resources. Includes multimedia, computer- 
based educational games, access to learning resources via the Internet, 
and web page design. An elective in secondary and licensed teacher 
programs. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 571. Early Childhood and Elementary Foundations - A 

study of historical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of early 
childhood and elementary education with an introduction to curriculum 
planning and an emphasis on major trends and issues in early childhood 
and elementary education. Offered summer term. Three semester hours. 



EDUC 541. Integrating the Arts into Curriculum - A study of the 
use of the arts to stimulate creativity and as a means of expressing ideas, 
including the relationship between the arts and other subject areas, and 



EDUC 572. Advanced Child Guidance - A study of skills and 
techniques for handling behavioral and disciplinary issues of young 
children. Candidates create and design creative experiences and 



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92 education (M.Ed.) 



activities for children in the setting of their internship. Emphasis is on 
providing a developmentally appropriate environment that fosters 
social/emotional development. Offered occasionally. Three semester 
hours. 

EDUC 573. Advanced Child Development and Learning - An 

interdisciplinary study of the physical, cognitive, social, and personality 
development of the child from birth through adolescence. Major 
theories of learning including the constructivist model are covered. 
Implications of child development for classroom teaching are 
addressed. Three semester hours. Offered summer term each year. 

EDUC 575. Advanced Early Childhood Administration - A 

discussion of the philosophy, organization, and components of 
developmentally appropriate programs for children and their families. 
Administration, environmental aspects, parent and community 
involvement, staff supervision, evaluation, development, and budget of 
programs are examined. Offered summer term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

EDUC 576. Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and 
Methods - A study of the educational needs of children. Focus is on 
planning and implementing learning environments that provide hands- 
on discovery learning where the student is an active participant, 
problem-solver, and decision-maker. Candidates learn how to use 
assessment and implement integrated thematic units and projects related 
to students' interests and state standards. Includes guidance and 
classroom management. Offered summer term. Three semester hours. 



EDUC 585. The Child Who is Multiply Handicapped - A study of 
the nature and needs of individuals with severe, profound, and multiple 
handicaps with emphasis on basis educational approaches and on the 
roles of federal, state, and local agencies in providing services to this 
population. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 590. Directed Study - Research related to a specific 
educational problem under the direct supervision of an instructor. 
Offered each term. One to six semester hours. 

EDUC 592. Grant Writing - An overview of the grant writing process 
including how to research grant opportunities and how to determine 
those most appropriate for their own situations. Students write grant 
proposals and follow-up reports, tailoring proposals to specific 
organizations. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 595. Contemporary Issues - A seminar designed to promote 
in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not 
included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from 
semester to semester. An elective in licensed teacher programs. Offered 
occasionally. One to three semester hours. 

EDUC 621. Assessment and Evaluation - A focus on the strategies 
for the assessment and evaluation of student and teacher performance, 
including construction of teacher-made tests and alternate approaches. 
Candidates also learn how to read and interpret standardized test scores 
for student diagnosis and individualization of instruction. Offered fall 
term each year. Three semester hours. 



EDUC 577. Language Arts and Reading - A study of the current 
methods and strategies for teaching language arts and reading, including 
such topics as language development, phonological awareness, word 
recognition, whole language, comprehension, vocabulary development, 
writing, spelling, and assessment. Offered summer term. Three semester 
hours. 



EDUC 622. Classroom Management - A study of positive child 
guidance and effective classroom management strategies. Emphasis is 
on creating safe, caring classrooms through organizing and managing 
effectively. Topics include psychosocial, physical, instructional, 
organizational, procedural, and behavior dimensions of classroom 
management. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 



EDUC 579. Children with Special Needs - A study of early childhood 
and elementary special education areas: assessment; family participation; 
IEPs/IFSPs; service delivery models; general curriculum; and intervention 
strategies. Also includes a study of diversity and its implications for 
teaching and learning. Offered spring or summer term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

EDUC 582. Characteristics of Exceptional Children - A studv of all 
aspects of exceptional children including reading, arithmetic, auditory, 
visual, and perceptual motor problems as well as characteristics of 
children who are gifted. The student is introduced to assessment using 
diagnostic tests to determine if special services are needed to assist the 
children in achieving. Principles and best practices in classroom 
management are also studied. An experiential approach is used so that 
critical thinking skills may aid in decision-making. Offered occasionally. 
Three semester hours. 

EDUC 583. Educational Procedures for Exceptional Children - 

Educational procedures and materials for teaching exceptional children 
who are learning disabled, mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, 
physically handicapped, gifted, and socially maladjusted with an 
emphasis on learning. Techniques discussed include behavior 
modification, perceptual remediation, cognitive and intellectual 
development, and the use of various apparati helpful to exceptional 
children. An additional two clock hours per week may be required for 
observation and experience in the schools. Offered occasionally. Three 
semester hours. 

EDUC 584. The Child Who is Mentally Retarded - A study of the 
causes and characteristics of mental retardation. The diagnosis, 
treatment, curriculum, life care, parental adjustment, and psychological 
development of the mentally retarded are discussed. Offered 
occasionally. Three semester hours. 



EDUC 626. Mentorship - A study of the mentoring process. Areas of 
study include classroom and school environments that effectively 
nurture mentors and protegees; the recruitment, selection, and training 
of mentors; matching mentors and protegees; and evaluating the results 
of mentoring. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 631. Family and Community Culture - A discussion of 
anthropological skills for studying children in the context of families 
and communities, including some discussion of various sub-cultures in 
the United States. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 662. School Organization and Law - A study of the 
organization and structure of the school including central office 
activities, special services, supervision, and school level administration. 
Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

EDUC 670. Professional Teacher Standards - A course preparing 
teachers to meet professional standards established by the National 
Board of Professional Teaching Standards, paralleling the 
documentation process required for National Board Certification. This 
course reviews the five areas required for National Board Certification: 
1) Teachers are committed to students and their learning; 2) Teachers 
know the subjects thev teach and how to teach those subjects to 
students; 3) Teachers are responsible for managing and monitoring 
student learning; 4) Teachers think systematically about their practice 
and learn from experience; and 5) Teachers are members of learning 
communities. Students are coached through an extensive series of 
performance-based assessments. A portfolio is required for this course. 
Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



English 93 



English 

Area of Humane Learning 

The English major supports the following goal of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts... and to understand a significant body of material in 
their major fields of study. 

Graduates of Milligan's English program go on to teach in public and 
private schools and colleges (with additional study), to do graduate work 
in English and related fields, to study law, to work as journalists, editors, 
and public relations officers, to study library science/information 
technology, and to work in marketing, customer assistance, and other 
aspects of the business world. 

The course of study in English language and literature is designed to 
enable the student (1) to read literature with appreciation, 
understanding, and a developing critical sophistication; (2) to write clear 
and effective literary criticism and analysis; and (3) to acquire a 
knowledge base which will allow the individual to pursue additional 
education or to obtain gainful employment. 



English major - B.A. (30 hrs) 

ENGL 304 or 305 Survey of American Literature (3 hrs) 

ENGL 460 Elizabethan Drama (3 hrs) or 461 Jacobean Drama 
(3 hrs) 

Six hours of literature from HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202 (6 hrs) 

At least one course from 4 of the 5 areas below: 
English Language and Literary Criticism (311, 312, 450) 
Medieval and Renaissance Literature (430, 460, 461, 462) 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Literature (304, 361) 
Nineteenth-Century Literature (434, 435) 
Modern and Post-Modern Literature (305, 402, 411, 414, 415) 

Additional courses in English as needed for a total of 30 hrs in the 
major 

Six hours of junior or senior level theatre arts courses may be applied to 
an English major. The English major is available only as a Bachelor of 
Arts degree; therefore, foreign language through the intermediate level 
is required. 

Every English major must take the ETS Major Field Test Literature in 
English II (senior major exam). 

The secondary English teacher licensure program includes the 
following courses: 

ENGL 304 or 305 Survey of American Literature (3 hrs) 

ENGL 311 Advanced Grammar (3 hrs) 

ENGL 361 Novel or 362 African-American Literature or 414 

British Fiction (3 hrs) 
ENGL 402 Short Story or 363 Appalachian Literature or 365 

Literature by Women (3 hrs) 
ENGL 460 Elizabethan Drama or 461 Jacobean Drama (3 hrs) 
ENGL electives (9 hrs) 
Six hours of world literature from the humanities sequence or 

from ENGL 402, 411, 495 (Post-Colonial Literature), or 

HUMN 285 (6 hrs) 
EDUC 357 Content Area Reading (3 hrs) 

For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree with an English major 
must complete English electives to total 30 semester hours in the major. 
The following six hours of Theatre Arts courses may be substituted for 
six hours of English electives: THEA 242 Fundamentals of Acting and 
THEA 340 Fundamentals of Directing. Foreign language through the 
intermediate level is required. 



English minor (18 hrs) 

Six hours from HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202 (6 hrs) 
Electives in both American and English literature (12 hrs) 



Course Descriptions 

ENGL 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the 
student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an 
individualized approach in a field not covered in a single course. Not 
open to freshmen. One to three semester hours. 

ENGL 304-305. Survey of American Literature - A study of the 
literature of the American people with special attention to the writings 
of the major authors. Collateral reading is assigned in the American 
novel. ENGL 304 offered fall term two out of three years; ENGL 305 
offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours each semester. 

ENGL 311. Advanced Grammar - Advanced study in the principles of 
English grammar with attention to sentence structure, verb forms, and 
current usage. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester 
hours. 

ENGL 312. Introduction to Linguistics - A study of the basic 
principles of linguistic analysis as specifically applied to the English 
language. Offered fall term every third year. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 335. Editing and Style for Print Media - A survey of the 
fundamentals of editing, style, layout, and production in print media 
such as newspapers, newsletters, and magazines. Attention will also be 
given to the impact of computers and emerging forms of technology. 
Lab work with The Stampede or other publication is required. 
Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of instructor. Offered fall term 
odd years. Three semester hours. Same as COMM 335. 

ENGL 354. Children's Literature - A study of children's literature 
designed to acquaint the student with the literary contributions suitable 
for elementary grades. Not applicable towards an English major. 
Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 361. Novel - A study of the history and development of the 
novel as a literary type with special emphasis on eighteenth and 
nineteenth-century British and American novels. Offered spring term 
each year. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 362. African-American Narrative Literature - A study of 
autobiographical and fictional narratives bv African-American writers 
with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and attention 
to historical context and current critical issues. This course fulfills the 
ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 363. Appalachian Literature - A study of fiction and poetrv of 
Appalachia from both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with 
ancillary consideration of the history and sociology of the region. This 
course involves discussions, research, and oral presentations. Offered 
spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 364. The Fiction of C. S. Lewis - A close look at Lewis's 
fictional works, with some reference to his other writings. Offered fall 
term each year. Three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



94 English 



ENGL 365. Literature by Women - A study of women's literature as 
a distinct tradition. The course involves reading of major women writers 
from different periods and genres, with the major emphasis on the 
nineteenth century and the twentieth century. Writers studied include 
Mar)' Wollstonecraft, the Brontes, Christina Rosserti, Kate Chopin, 
Virginia Woolf, Susan Glaspell, Doris Lessing, Adrienne Rich, Toni 
Morrison, and Caryl Churchill. Offered fall term alternate years. Three 
semester hours. 

ENGL 402. Short Story - A chronological study of the development of 
the short story in the western tradition during the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries with emphasis on American, British, and post- 
colonial stories; some attention to creative writing. Offered fall term 
alternate years. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 411. Twentieth-Century Literature - A study of leading 
writers of fiction, poetry, and drama in the twentieth century, including 
American, English, and post-colonial writers. This is a seminar course, 
involving discussions, independent research, and oral presentations. 
Offered fall term even,' third year. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 414. British Fiction of the Twentieth Century - A study of 
major British writers in the Twentieth Century, such as A. S. Byatt, 
Joseph Conrad, E. M. Forster, Graham Greene, James Joyce, D. H. 
Lawrence, Kafherine Mansfield, Iris Murdoch, and Virginia Woolf. 
Offered fall term every third year. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 415. Southern Renascence/Harlem Renaissance - A study 
of two early twentieth-century phenomena — the most significant post- 
World War I manifestation of African- American arts and letters, the 
Harlem Renaissance, and the exclusively white Southern Renascence — 
which centers around how the two combined have profoundly 
influenced the development of southern literature. This is a seminar 
course, involving discussions, independent research, and oral 
presentations. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 424. Advanced Writing - An opportunity for extensive 
experience in writing, editing, critiquing the works of others, and 
working toward publication. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-2, 201-2 (or 
equivalent) and approval of the instructor. Offered spring term alternate 
years. Three semester hrs. 



ENGL 431. Feature Writing for Print Media - A practical course in 
researching and writing in-depth feature articles for newspapers and 
magazines, including a survey of trends in feature writing. Students are 
encouraged to submit feature articles to the campus newspaper and to 
regional or national publications. Offered spring term alternate years. 
Three semester hours. Same as COMM 431. 

ENGL 434. The Age of Wordsworth: Poetry, Prose, Politics - A 

study of the Romantic era in English literature with special emphasis 
upon the poet Wordsworth and his contemporaries, both poets and 
prose writers, along with selected political writings. Offered spring term 
alternate years. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 435. Victorian Period - A study of the fascinating 
contradictions of the second half of the nineteenth century as expressed 
in the major poets, essayists, and novelists of the period. Offered spring 
term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 450. Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism - A 

study of the theory and practice of literary criticism, designed to provide 
knowledge of the underpinnings of the discipline and a primary 
conversance with the major approaches. This is a seminar course, 
involving discussions, independent research, and oral presentations. 
Offered fall term every third year. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 460. Elizabethan Drama - An examination of the earlier 
Shakespearean plays with collateral reading in the works of his fellow 
playwrights. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 461. Jacobean Drama - An examination of the later 
Shakespearean plays with collateral reading in the works of his fellow 
playwrights. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 462. Love and Faith: Spenser, Donne, Milton, and Their 
Contemporaries - Careful readings of the works of Spenser, Sidney, 
Shakespeare (nondramatic), Jonson, the Metaphysical poets, and Milton. 
Offered fall term every third year. Three semester hours. 

ENGL 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings 
which provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. One to three semester hours. 



ENGL 430. Medieval Literature - A study of English literature of the 
Middle Ages, from Beowulf and "The Dream of the Rood" to Sir 
Gawain and the Green Knight and portions of Canterbury Tales and 
Morte d' Arthur. Also included are the plays Everyman and The Second 
Shepherds' Play and many shorter works, such as Caedmon's hymn, 
Anglo-Saxon riddles, and even a ballad about Robin Hood. Offered fall 
term alternate years. Three semester hours. 



ENGL 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and 
conferences which provides for individualized study. One to three 
semester hours. 

ENGL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. One to three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



exercise science | film studies 95 



Exercise Science 

Area of Education 

The exercise science minor supports the following goals of Milligan 
College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

■ Students will participate in the activities of a healthy lifestyle such 
as intramurals, intercollegiate sports, musical and theatrical groups, 
student clubs, student government, and other campus-sponsored 
extracurricular endeavors, in preparation for life-long participation 
in similar activities. 



The skills and knowledge gained through the exercise science minor 
allow students to pursue jobs in school, community, or industrial 
settings and provides a springboard into various graduate programs. 

HPXS major - B.A. or B.S. (38 hrs) 

Emphasis in Exercise Science 

A student may declare an HPXS major with an emphasis in exercise 
science. For further information on this major, refer to the information 
under the listing for Human Performance and Exercise Science 
(HPXS). 



Film Studies 

Area of Performing, Visual and Communicative Arts 

Communications major - B.A. or B.S. 
(36 hrs) 

Emphasis in Film Studies 

A student may declare a communications major with an emphasis in 
Film Studies. For further information on this major, refer to the 
information under the listing "Communications." 

Film Studies minor (18 hrs) 

Communications majors with a broadcasting emphasis interested in 
pursuing vocations in the film industry minor in Film Studies by taking 
one of two programs of study: 

1 . Completion of on-campus courses including THEA 242 and 
340; COMM 495 American Film History; nine additional 
hours of electives with courses and course content adapted 
for the minor with the approval of the adviser and the class 
instructor. 

2. Admission to and completion of the Los Angeles Film 
Studies program, a semester-long, 15-credit hour program 
sponsored by the Council for Christian Colleges & 
Universities (CCCU). This program allows students to study 
filmmaking in Los Angeles while doing internships at 
businesses in the entertainment industry. In addition the 
student also completes COMM 495 American Film History. 



Exercise Science minor (20 hrs) 

HPXS 341 Exercise Physiology (4 hrs) 
HPXS 352 Kinesiology and Biomechanics (4 hrs) 
BIOL 250 and 251 Anatomy and Physiology (8 hrs) 
CHEM (4 hrs) 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



96 fine arts 



Fine Arts 

Area of Performing, Visual and Communicative arts 

The fine arts major is designed to contribute to the development of 
students' God-given personalities and talents by increasing their 
appreciation for and knowledge of human creativity. Within that 
context, the major in fine arts cultivates the development of Christian 
artists who glorify God by striving for the highest standards of 
artistic excellence-ministering to people through their art and 
contributing to the richness and beauty of life, both in the church 
and in society. 

The fine arts major supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their 
abilitv to read and think analytically and critically, to 
communicate clearly and effectively, to evidence knowledge and 
competencies in liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, 
and to understand a significant body of material in their major 
field of study. 

■ Students will participate in the activities of a healthy lifestyle 
such as intramurals, intercollegiate sports, musical and theatre 
groups, student clubs, student government, and other campus- 
sponsored extra-curriculum endeavors, in preparation for life- 
long participation in similar activities. 

Graduates with a fine arts major are expected to: (1) demonstrate a 
clear understanding of the fundamental skills, theories, principles, and 
technologies necessary in the making of art, music, photography, or 
theatre; (2) demonstrate the capacity to formulate a personal 
philosophy and aesthetic direction for their art; (3) demonstrate a 
basic understanding of the link between art making and the study of 
art history and current trends in art; (4) be capable of constructing 
intelligent standards for the critical evaluation of art. 

The strength of the fine arts major lies in its interdisciplinarv nature. 
There are four areas of emphasis from which a student may choose 
when declaring a fine arts major. They are art, music, photography, 
and theatre arts. The electives within the fine arts major are 
determined by the students with their advisers to address the specific 
goals of the students. The fine arts major is available only as a 
Bachelor of Arts degree; foreign language through the intermediate 
level is required. 

While there is no fine arts minor, a student may minor in art, music, 
photography, or theatre arts. 



Fine Arts major - B.A. (36-39 hrs) 



Fine Arts major with Art emphasis 




Core (11 hrs) 




Art emphasis (27 hrs) 




One of the following: THEA 151, 
242. 340. or 345 


3 hrs 


ART 110 Design 
Fundamentals 


3 hrs 


ART 120 Fine Arts Colloquium 


lhr 


ART 250 Drawing 1 


3 hrs 


ART 237 Basic Photography 


3 hrs 


ART 251 Painting 1 


3 hrs 


ART 400 Field Studies in Fine 
Arts 


lhr 


ART 350 Drawing II 


3 hrs 


ART 421 The Arts, Faith, and 
Culture 


3 hrs 


ART 351 Painting II 


3 hrs 






ART 367 Art History 


3 hrs 






ART 411 Printmaktng Studio 
or 431 Sculpture Studio 


3 hrs 






ART 490 Directed Studies 


3 hrs 






ART 494 Senior Exhibition 


3 hrs 




Fine Arts major with Music emphasis 


Core (14 hrs) 




Music emphasis (25 hrs) 




ART 237 Basic Photography 


3 hrs 


MUSC 143 Basic Music 
Theory/Ear Training 


3 hrs 


ART 110, 250. 251, or any 
other studio art 


3 hrs 


MUSC 144 Basic Music 
Theory/Ear Training 


3 hrs 


ART 120 Fine Arts Colloquium 


lhr 


MUSC 163 Survey of Pop 
Music 


3 hrs 


ART 400 Field Studies in Fine 
Arts 


lhr 


MUSC 265 Music History 
Survey 


3 hrs 


ART 421 The Arts, Faith, and 
Culture 


3 hrs 


MUSC 363 Basic Conducting 


3 hrs 


THEA 242 Fundamentals of 
Acting 


3 hrs 


MUSC 490 Senior Project 


2 hrs 






Applied study (Principal ) 3 
semester minimum 


3 hrs 






Applied study (Secondary) 2 
semesters or until MUSC 207 
is passed 


lhr 






Ensembles 


4 hrs 




Fine Arts major with 


Photography emphasis 




Core (11 hrs) 




Photography emphasis (27 
hrs) 




One of the following: THEA 
151, 242, 340, or 345 


3 hrs 


ART 237 Basic Photography 


3 hrs 


ART 110, 250, 251, or other 

studio art 


3 hrs 


ART 310 Intermediate 
Photography 


3 hrs 


ART 120 Fine Arts Colloquium 


lhr 


ART 312 Introduction to Color 
Photography 


3 hrs 


ART 400 Field Studies in Fine 
Arts 


lhr 


ART 337 Photojournalism 


3 hrs 


ART 421 The Arts, Faith, and 
Culture 


3 hrs 


ART 367 Art History 


3 hrs 






ART/C0MM 453 or ART 437 
Advanced B&W Photography 
(or View Camera or Studio at 
ETSU) 


3 hrs 






ART 466 History of 
Photography 


3 hrs 






ART 490 Directed Studies 


3 hrs 






ART 494 Senior Exhibition 


3 hrs 




Fine Arts major with Theatre Arts emphasis 


Core (11 hrs) 




Theatre Arts emphasis (25 
hrs) 




ART 237 Basic Photography 


3 hrs 


THEA 141 Fund of 
Voice/Stage Movement 


3 hrs 


ART 110, 250, 251, or other 
studio art 


3 hrs 


THEA 151 Introduction to 
Theatre 


3 hrs 


ART 120 Fine Arts Colloquium 


lhr 


THEA 242 Fundamentals of 
Acting 


3 hrs 


ART 400 Field Studies in Fine 
Arts 


lhr 


THEA 340 Fundamentals of 
Directing 


3 hrs 


ART 421 The Arts, Faith, and 
Culture 


3 hrs 


THEA 345 Theatre for Young 
Audiences 


6 hrs 






THEA 470 Dramatic Literature 
and Criticism 


3 hrs 






MUSC 100 Voice Elective 
or equivalent in vocal 
ensemble 


1 hi 



ENGL 460 Elizabethan 
Drama or 461 Jacobean 
Drama 



3 hrs 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



fitness and wellness 97 



Art emphasis 

Students completing the fine arts program with an emphasis in art 
acquire a strong foundation in visual art skills, insights, and overall 
aesthetic awareness. Outstanding students are prepared to apply to 
graduate school, enabling them to teach college or to pursue careers as 
professional artists. The art world also provides numerous opportunities 
to well-trained creative young artists in related art vocations-gallery and 
museum work, arts organization jobs, and free-lance art. 

Music emphasis 

The music emphasis is designed to help students acquire skills in 
various aspects of music. The curriculum is taught from an artistic 
standpoint that prepares students for several music-related careers. 
Graduates can use their knowledge of basic music theory, solo and 
ensemble performance practice, and popular and historical music 
literature for careers in musical theatre, vocal or instrumental coaching, 
or to assist in studio work. The curriculum leads toward Music 490 
Senior Project, in which the student engages in practical work related to 
a desired career in one of these fields. 

Photography emphasis 

The photographv emphasis is designed to help students acquire skills in 
various aspects of photography. The curriculum is taught from an 
artistic standpoint that gives students the creativity and experience 
necessary for a rewarding future in photography. Graduates can use 
their knowledge of photographic processes, aesthetics, and history to 
provide professional services to the art community or commercial 
photographic markets. Photographers also provide supporting services 
for galleries, theatres, museums, and publishing; some teach 
photography. 

Theatre Arts emphasis 

The theatre arts emphasis stresses a basic understanding and 
appreciation for all facets of theatre work. Theatre arts graduates can 
work as actors, costumers, stage managers, set designers, lighting 
technicians, sound operators, stage carpenters, arts agency promoters, 
and stage directors, while others can go on to study theatre in graduate 
school in preparation for teaching, business, and the ministry. 

K-12 teacher licensure in Theatre 

Milligan College offers teacher licensure in theatre for grades K-12. 
Those interested in licensure to teach must major in Fine Arts with an 
emphasis in Theatre. Students must complete the theatre and English 
courses listed below to fulfill content area licensure requirements. See 
the Education section of this catalog for additional requirements. 

ENGL 41 1 Twentieth-Century Literature OR 461 Jacobean 

Drama (3 hrs) 
ENGL 460 Elizabethan Drama (3 hrs) 
MUSC 100 Applied Study - Voice (1 - 2 hrs) 
THEA 141 Fundamentals of Voice/Stage Movement (3 hrs) 
THEA 151 Introduction to Theatre (3 hrs) 
THEA 242 Fundamentals of Acting (3 hrs) 
THEA 340 Fundamentals of Directing (3 hrs) 
THEA 345 Theatre for Young Audiences (3 hrs) 
THEA 2520 Stagecraft (at ETSU) (3 hrs) 



Fitness and Wellness 

Area of Education 

The Fitness and Wellness minor supports the following goals of 
Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

■ Students will participate in the activities of a healthy lifestyle such 
as intramurals, intercollegiate sports, musical and theatrical groups, 
student clubs, student government, and other campus-sponsored 
extracurricular endeavors, in preparation for life-long participation 
in similar activities. 

The skills and knowledge gained through the Fitness and Wellness 

minor 
allow students to pursue jobs in community or industrial settings and 
provides a springboard into various graduate programs. 



HPXS major - B.A. or B.S. (38 hrs) 

Emphasis in Fitness and Wellness 

A student may declare an HPXS major with an emphasis in fitness and 
wellness. For further information on this major, refer to the information 
under the listing Human Performance and Exercise Science (HPXS). 



Fitness and Wellness minor (20 hrs) 

HPXS 101 Fitness for Life (1 hr) 

HPXS 308 Measurement and Evaluation (3 hrs) 

HPXS 310a First Aid and CPR (1 hr) 

HPXS 341 Exercise Physiology (4 hrs) 

HPXS 352 Kinesiology and Biomechanics (4 hrs) 

HPXS 436 Exercise in Health and Disease (3 hrs) 

BIOL 251 Anatomy and Physiology (4 hrs) 



For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



98 French 



French 



Area of Humane Learning 

The French program supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts. . 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through . . . 
appreciation for the arts . . . and preparation for graduate studies 
and a rewarding career or profession. 

The French program emphasizes the four language skills of listening, 
speaking, reading, and writing. While the primary focus is on developing 
competency in communication, the secondary French licensure 
program and the French minor provide a foundation in the literature 
and culture of the country. Graduates may pursue careers in teaching, in 
translating and interpreting (with additional study), in the tourism and 
hospitality industry, or in the diplomatic services. French is a valuable 
asset in international business, in international agencies (such as the 
International Red Cross), and in the fashion industry. 

French minor (18 hrs) 

Eighteen hours of French beyond the level of French 111 - 112 
Some of these courses may need to be taken off Milligan's campus; 
cooperative opportunities are available. 



Secondary French Teacher licensure 

The secondary French teacher licensure program includes the following 



FREN 301 and 302 Advanced Conversation and Composition 

(6 hrs) 
FREN 311 and 312 Survey of French Literature I and II (6 hrs) 
FREN 401 and 402 French Civilization and Culture I and II 

(6 hrs) 
ENGL 312 Linguistics or a course in Advanced French Grammar 

(3 hrs) 
HUMN 490 Reading and Research in Humane Learning (3 hrs) 

For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



Course Descriptions 

FREN 111-112. Elementary French - A proficiency-oriented 
introductory course emphasizing oral communicative skills, including 
the essentials of grammar, practical vocabulary, and basic reading and 
writing skills within a cultural context. Three class periods and one 
laboratory period per week. French 111 offered fall term each year; 
French 112 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each 
semester. 



FREN 211-212. Intermediate French - A proficiencv-oriented 
intermediate course consisting of a review of elementary skills and an 
integrated development of more complex listening, speaking, reading 
and writing skills. Cultural and literary readings serve as a basis for class 
discussion and written compositions. Three class periods and one 
laboratory period per week. Pre-requisite: FREN 1 12 or equivalent. 
French 211 offered fall term each year; French 212 offered spring term 
each year. Three semester hours each semester. 

FREN 301-302. Advanced Conversation and Composition - 

Intensive practice in the oral and written language with emphasis on 
vocabulary, syntax, and culture necessary for communication. Classes 
are conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 21 1-212 or equivalent. 
French 301 offered fall term and French 302 offered spring term every 
three years (based on student demand). Three semester hours each 
semester. 

FREN 311. Survey of French Literature I - A study of the major 
works of French literature from the Middle Ages through the 
Eighteenth Century. Selections from a variety of authors and genres are 
read. Readings and discussions are in French. Prerequisites: French 21 1 
and 212 or equivalent. Offered fall term ever)' three years (based on 
student demand). Three semester hours. 

FREN 312. Survey of French Literature II - A study of the major 
works in French literature from the Nineteenth and Twentieth 
centuries. Selections from a variety of authors and genres are read. 
Readings and discussions are in French. Prerequisites: French 21 1 and 
212 or equivalent. Offered spring term every three years (based on 
student demand). Three semester hours. 

FREN 401. French Civilization and Culture I - An overview of 
French civilization and culture from prehistoric times to the present. 
Topics include geography, history, philosophy, an, and music. Readings, 
class discussion, and reports are in French. Prerequisites: French 211- 
212 or equivalent. Offered fall term every three years (based on student 
demand). Three semester hours. 

FREN 402. French Civilization and Culture II - A cultural study of 
contemporary French society. Topics include family, religion, education, 
government, economy, and structure of society. Readings, class 
discussion, and reports are in French. Prerequisites: French 211-212 or 
equivalent. Offered spring term every three years (based on student 
demand). Three semester hours. 

FREN 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings 
which provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. Available on demand. One to three semester hours. 

FREN 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and 
conferences which provides for individualized study. Available on 
demand. One to three semester hours. 

FREN 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas 
beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. 
Available on demand. One to three semester hours per semester. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



general science | geography 99 



General Science 

Area of Scientific Learning 

The general science minor supports the following goals of Milligan 
College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

Students may seek to have a general exposure to the field of science 
through the general science minor. Those students who are seeking 
education licensure in a major field will have a strong background in 
science which may qualify them to teach certain science courses. The 
flexibility which this allows a student who is interested in science as a 
complement to their chosen major may encourage more students to 
pursue their interest in the sciences. 

Any student majoring in either biology or chemistry must choose the six 
courses required for the general science minor outside the field of 
biology or chemistry to satisfy the minor requirements. 



Geography 

Area of Social Learning 

The study of geography provides students with an awareness of the 
physical, economic, and political features of the wodd, the cultures 
which are encountered in the world's regions, as well as the instruments 
and devices used in the field of study. 

GEOG 201. Regional Geography - A regional survey of the world 
followed by an in-depfh study of North America, Europe, Russia, 
Japan, and Oceania. Topics include aspects of political, economic, 
physical, and cultural geography. Offered spring term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

GEOG 202. Cultural and Ethnic Geography - An introduction to 
world/human geography emphasizing human geographic diversity and 
unity, space economy, functional organization, and 
human/ environmental impacts. The content includes the study of 
population, language, religion, folk and popular culture, economic 
activity, and human impact on natural systems. This course fulfills the 
ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. 
Offered each term. Three semester hours. 



General science minor (24 hrs) 

with a minimum of one course from each discipline: 

BIOL 111 and 112 Principles of Biology (8 hrs) 

BIOL 360 Ecology (4 hrs) 

CHEM 151 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry (4 hrs) 

CHEM 170 and 171 General Chemistry (8 hrs) 

PHYS 104 Earth and Space Science (4 hrs) 

PHYS 203 and 204 General Physics/Calculus (8 hrs) 

Supporting courses for the minor (4 - 6 hrs): 

MATH 211 PreCalculus/Calculus I (4 hrs) OR 

MATH 111 College Algebra I and 112 College Algebra II and 

Trigonometry (6 hrs) OR 
MATH 111 College Algebra I and 213 Statistics (6 hrs) 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



100 German I Greek 



German 

Area of Humane Learning 



German is Europe's most widely distributed language. The official 
language of Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein and Switzerland, German 
is the language of Europe's foremost business economy. Students of 
music, psychology, theology, and the laboratory sciences find German 
to be of inestimable value. Mastery of German at the intermediate level 
equips students to read, write, converse, and do basic academic 
research. 

GERM 111-112 will be offered as a concentrated six-hour course in 
Fall 2007; GERM 211-212 follows for six hours of credit in Spring 
2008. GERM 489 and 490 are offered by individual arrangement 
with the professor. 

GERM 111-112. Elementary German - The pronunciation and writing 
systems, dialogs and exercises for oral mastery of basic vocabulary and 
structural patterns, basic conversation, reading and written composition. 
Five class periods and not less than two laboratory periods per week. 
GERM 1 1 1 and GERM 112 meet during the fall term. Six semester 
hours. 

GERM 211-212. Intermediate German - Continued conversational 
practice, including discussion of timely topics based on readings from 
modern German literature and contemporary periodicals; writing 
practice and some grammar review. Five class periods and not less than 
one laboratory period per week. GERM 21 1 and GERM 212 meet 
during the spring term. Six semester hours. 

GERM 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings, 
which provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. One to three semester hours. 

GERM 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and 
conferences, which provides for individualized study. One to three 
semester hours. 



Greek 

Area of Humane Learning 

Greek minor (18 hrs) 

GREE 111-112. Elementary Greek - A study of the elements of Koine 
Greek including drill on simple phrases and sentences and the 
acquisition of vocabulary. Selected readings in New Testament literature 
are included in the second semester. Greek 111 offered fall term each 
year; Greek 112 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours 
each semester. 
Students must pass GREE 111 before enrolling in GREE 112. 

GREE 221-222. Intermediate Greek - The translation and 
grammatical analysis of New Testament passages representing a cross- 
section of Greek styles. The course also includes a study of intermediate 
grammar and some work with textual critical apparatus. Greek 221 
offered fall term each year; Greek 222 offered spring term each year. 
Three semester hours each semester. 

Students must pass GREE 112 before enrolling in GREE 221. 
Students must pass GREE 221 before enrolling in GREE 222. 

GREE 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the 
student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an 
individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. 
Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours. 

GREE 331. Advanced Greek Exegesis - The study and practice of 
exegetical methodologies for interpreting the Greek New Testament, 
with emphasis on their uses in teaching and preaching. Introduction to 
textual criticism is included. Offered fall term as needed. Three semester 
hours. 

GREE 332. Advanced Greek Readings - Selected readings in the 
Septuagint, Philo, Josephus, and the Apostolic Fathers with attention to 
historical-theological contributions of these writers and works. Offered 
spring term as needed. Three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



health care administration 1 Hebrew 101 



Health Care 
Administration 

Area of Business 

The health care administration minor supports the following goals of 
Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the social sciences, and to understand a significant 
body of material in their major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through stewardship 
of resources and preparation for graduate studies and a rewarding 
career or profession. 

The health care administration minor allows students majoring in other 
areas to obtain adequate exposure to issues and topics within the health 
care profession. A student majoring in the health care administration 
track within the business administration major may not minor in health 
care administration. 

Business major - B.A. or B.S. (45 hrs) 

Health care administration emphasis 

See "Business Administration" for more information about Milligan's 
business administration major with emphasis in health care 
administration. 



Hebrew 

Area of Humane Learning 

HEBR 111-112. Elementary Biblical Hebrew - A study of the 
elements of biblical Hebrew, with an emphasis on vocabulary, verbal 
morphology, and basic grammar. Selected readings from the Hebrew 
Bible are included in the second semester. Offered fall and spring terms 
in periodic years. Three hours each semester. 

HEBR 211-212. Intermediate Biblical Hebrew - A study of biblical 
Hebrew emphasizing grammar and syntax, with emphasis on achieving 
facility in reading the Hebrew Bible. Some attention is given to the use 
of textual critical apparatus. Offered fall and spring terms in periodic 
years. Three hours each semester. 



Health Care Administration minor 
(18 hrs) 

BADM 380 Introduction to Health Care Administration 

(3 hrs) 
BADM 480 Long-Term Care Administration (3 hrs) 
BADM 481 Policies and Issues in Health Care (3 hrs) 
PSYC 250 General Psychology (3 hrs) 

SOCL 321 Sociology of Death, Dying, and Bereavement (3 hrs) 
SOCL 470 Health, Illness, and Health Care Systems (3 hrs) 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



102 history 



History 

Area of Social Learning 

The study of history' is one of the core disciplines of a liberal arts 
education. At Milligan the study of history is rooted in the conviction 
that knowledge of the past contributes to intellectual maturity and an 
enriched quality of life, one of the objectives of the College's Mission 
Statement. In an age skeptical of tradition and infatuated with the 
contemporary, the study of history helps to broaden the student's 
world, leading to a richer understanding of the human condition in its 
various cultural, economic, and social contexts. The history major at 
Milligan also develops a respect and enthusiasm for sound scholarship, 
as it introduces students to the various ways that scholars have 
understood, described, and interpreted the past. Given their 
commitment as Christians, the history faculty strive to model the ways 
Christians do the work of historians and invite history majors to do 
likewise. 

The history faculty has designed the major to provide a broad 
intellectual foundation for entry into various professional fields. 
Milligan history majors have become teachers, lawyers, physicians, 
ministers, archivists, business professionals, and practicing historians. 

Graduates with a major in history are expected (1) to develop an 
appreciation for history and the craft of the historian; (2) to be equipped 
for graduate study and for teaching history; (3) to be able to make use 
of basic research tools and resources in order to write well about 
history. 



History major - B.A. (32 hrs) 

The history major at Milligan leads to the B.A. degree, which requires 
the study of a foreign language through the intermediate level. Students 
majoring in history shall construct, in consultation with their advisers, a 
course of study that includes a broad range of courses extending from 
the ancient through the modern world. Courses taught by Professors 
Thomas and Farmer are scheduled according to a three-year cycle; most 
of these courses 
are taught at least once every third year. 

Six hours from HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202 (6 hrs) 

HIST 209 and 210 United States History Survey I and II (6 hrs) 

HIST 401 History and Historians (1 hr) 

HIST 494 Senior Thesis Seminar (1 hr) 

Eighteen elective hours selected in consultation with the adviser 
(18 hrs) 

Completion of a foreign language through the intermediate level 



History licensure programs (middle 
grades and secondary history) 

GEOG 201 Regional Geography (3 hrs) 

GEOG 202 Cultural and Ethnic Geography (3 hrs) 

SOCL 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs) 

HIST 209 and 210 United States History Survey I and II (6 hrs) 

HIST 401 History and Historians (1 hr) 

HIST 494 Senior Thesis Seminar (1 hr) 

6 hours from the humanities sequence (6 hrs) 

3 hours of non-western history courses such as HIST 206 Hstory of 

Islam, HIST 208 History of the Jews Since 70 A.D., or HIST 480 

Seminar on Vietnam (3 hrs) 
Six hours of European history (6 hrs) 
Six hours from HIST 376, 377, 379, or 380 (6 hrs) 
HIST elective (3 hrs) 



For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



History minor (18 hrs) 

Six hours from HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202 (6 hrs) 
Twelve elective hours in history (12 hrs) 

Bible majors may not use HIST 341-342 or 431-432 to fulfill the 
history minor requirements. 



Course Descriptions 



HIST 206. History of Islam - A study of the political, religious, social, 
and cultural institutions of the Islamic world from the birth of 
Muhammad to the modern period. This course fulfills the ethnic 
studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered 
periodically. Three semester hours. 

HIST 208. History of the Jews since A.D. 70 - A social, cultural, 
theological, and political study of the Jewish people in the last two 
millennia. The course examines the influence and victimization of the 
Jews in Diaspora, giving special attention to such issues as the 
development of sacred texts; the rise of Christian-anti-Semitism; 
ghettoization and Enlightenment of European Jewry; the development 
of Hassidic, Reform, Conservative and Reconstruction Judaism; philo- 
Semitism; political anti-Semitism; Zionism; the Holocaust; the 
establishment and maintenance of the State of Israel; and 
dispensationalism. Part of a three-year cycle in European history, this 
course will be offered in spring term of 2008. The course fulfills the 
ethnic studies requirement in the general education core. Three 
semester hours. 

HIST 209. United States History Survey I - A study of the history of 
the United States from the European encounter to the War Between the 
States. The course examines the growth of political institutions and the 
social and economic life of the people of the United States. Offered fall 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

HIST 210. United States History Survey II - A study of the history 
of the United States from the War Between the States to the 1970s. The 
course examines the growth of political institutions and the social and 
economic life of the people of the United States. Offered spring term 
each year. Three semester hours. 

HIST 250. Christ, Hitler, and Women: The German Church 
Struggle 1933-1945 - A study of the Nazi persecution of Catholic and 
Protestant Churches, with special emphasis on the role of women in the 
Confessing Church. Part of a three-year cycle in European history, this 
course will be offered in the spring term of 2007 and 2010. Three 
semester hours. 

HIST 271. History of Christian Missions - A survey of the history 
and progress of missions since the beginning of Christianity. Offered 
only on demand. Three semester hours. Same as CMTN 271. 

HIST 275. Selected Topics in the History of the Reformation of 
the Nineteenth Century - An examination of the Stone-Campbell 
heritage including both primarv and secondary readings intended to 
help students understand the church tradition (the "Restoration 
Movement") that is linked to the history of Milligan College. Students 
may not apply this course to a major in Bible or history. Prerequisite: 
sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. One 
semester hour. 

HIST 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the 
student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an 
individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. 
Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



history 103 



HIST 306. Medieval European Society - A study of the development 
of Western European civilization from the collapse of the Roman 
Empire through the fourteenth century. The course encompasses the 
political, economic, religious, and intellectual dimensions of medieval 
European culture and society. Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201- 
202, or six hours of European history, or consent of instructor. Offered 
periodically. Three semester hours. 

HIST 316. The Press in Society - A study of the history and 
development of news and news media and their role and impact in 
modern societies. The course will examine cultural, religious, political, 
technological, and economic interactions between "the press" and the 
societies in which they operate, paying particular attention to the United 
States. Cross listed as COMM 316. Offered spring term odd years. 
Three semester hours. 

HIST 323. Christian Thought in the Greco-Roman World - A 

course of readings in various representatives of the Christian tradition 
from the second through the fifth century, including Origen, Tertullian, 
Cyprian, Athanasius, Ambrose, and Augustine in their historical 
contexts. Special attention is given to the contributions of these thinkers 
to the development of the Christian tradition. This course may satisfy 
the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisites: 
HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or consent of the instructor. Offered 
periodically. Three semester hours. 

HIST 324. Roman History through the Pax Romana - A study of 
Rome's progress from its origins through its Republican period and the 
peak of its Empire in the first two centuries of the Christian era (the 
Pax Romana). Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or six hours 
of European history, or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. 
Three semester hours. 

HIST 326. Late Roman and Byzantine Empires - A study of 
Roman history from the end of the Pax Romana in the late second 
century A.D. The course examines the centuries of decline and collapse 
in the Western Empire as well as the Byzantine Empire to 1 453. 
Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 and HIST 324, or consent 
of instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

HIST 331. History of Modern Britain, 1688-Present - A diplomatic 
and cultural study of the British Isles since the Glorious Revolution of 
1688 This course examines the remarkable British record of increasingly 
democratic constitutional reform that avoided the violence that shook 
the rest of Europe in the last three centuries. The study focuses special 
attention on the political, philosophical, and religious movements that 
have produced modern Britain. Prerequisites: HUMN 101, 102, 201, 
202 or consent of the instructor. Part of a three-year cycle in European 
history, this course will be offered in Fall 2007 and 2010. Three 
semester hours. 

HIST 332. History of Modern France, 1789-Present - A diplomatic 
and cultural study of France since the Revolution of 1789. This course 
examines France's mercurial role as a Western power, and its vacillation 
between republicanism and autocracy through five republics and two 
empires. The course focuses special attention on the role of religion in 
the cultural and political life of the country. Prerequisite: HUMN 101- 
102 and 201-202 or consent of the instructor. Part of a three-year cycle 
in European history, this course will be offered in fall 2009. Three 
semester hours. 

HIST 333. History of Modern Germany, 1806-Present A 

diplomatic and cultural study of Germany since the Congress of Vienna, 
this course examines Germany's rise from fragmentation within the 
Holy Roman Empire to its present role as an economic and cultural 
European giant. The study focuses special attention on the 
philosophical and religious movements that have shaped Germany's 
national character. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or 
consent of the instructor. Part of a three-year cycle in European history. 
Three semester hours. 



HIST 334. Issues in 20th Century Europe - A study of political, 
social, religious, and philosophical issues in Europe during the twentieth 
century This course examines the continent's major political 
philosophies: Marxism, fascism, and democracy. It investigates the 
"isms" of the past century, among them nationalism, anti-Semitism, 
Zionism, and imperialism with their related issues of church/state 
relations, emigration, xenophobia, union, and an alleged "post- 
Christian" age. Class discussion ties current events to their historical 
antecedents. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or instructor's 
permission. Part of a three-year cycle in European history. Three 
semester hours. 

HIST 341-342. Church History - A study of the history of the church 
from its beginning to the present. The course examines the rise of 
theological patterns, denominational developments, and the church's 
response to prevailing culture. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201- 
202 or six hours of history and consent of instructor. HIST 341 offered 
fall term and HIST 342 offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours each semester. 

HIST 343. History of Biblical Interpretation - A survey of the 
history of hermeneutics and exegesis in the Christian tradition from the 
ancient through the modern periods. The course examines the various 
principles and methods adopted by theologians in their attempts to 
explain the meaning of the biblical text. The course emphasizes a 
program of readings in commentaries and homiletic literature 
representing different periods in the history of Christianity. This course 
may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. 
Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or consent of the 
instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

HIST 344. The Historical Jesus - A study of how scholars have 
attempted to develop historical reconstructions of the life of Jesus. This 
course will survey the progress of scholarly and popular treatment of 
the topic, the variety and nature of documents upon which historical 
reconstructions are based, and the major methods used to test 
historicity and evaluation of these methods. The relationship between 
historical reconstructions and the Jesus of faith will be considered. 
Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours. 

HIST 352. Reformations of the Sixteenth Century - A study of the 
religious and theological reform movements in sixteenth-century 
Europe. The course focuses on the various theologies of the period, 
exploring the meaning of the term "reformation" as it applies to the 
various religious movements: Lutheran, Reformed, Radical, and 
Catholic. This course may satisfy the Church history core elective for 
the Bible major. Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or six 
hours of European history, or consent of instructor. Offered 
periodically. Three semester hours. 

HIST 376. Jefferson to Jackson - A study of the period between the 
lives of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson with attention given to 
the ideas and events which resulted in the emergence of the nation and 
the development of the frontier. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or 
consent of instructor. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester 
hours. 

HIST 377. The Middle Period: 1840-1880 - A survey of the core years 
of the Nineteenth Century in the United States. At the center of the 
course of study are the American Civil War, its causes, character, and 
consequences. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of 
instructor. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

HIST 379. The Gilded Age: 1877-1920 - An examination of the 
nation in the midst of its industrial development and rapid population 
growth with specific reference to the impact of that industrialization on 
U.S. culture and politics. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of 
instructor. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



104 human performance and exercise science 



HIST 380. The United States in the Twentieth Century - An 

exploration of U. S. culture and society from World War I to the 
present. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of instructor. 
Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

HIST 401. History and Historians - A study of the discipline of 
history and the role played by historians in recording, writing, and 
interpreting history. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, twelve hours 
of history, and consent of instructor. Offered fall term each year. One 
semester hour. 

HIST 431-432. Reformation of the Nineteenth Century - A study of 
the religious movement to restore New Testament Christianity as a 
basis for Christian union. HIST 432 may satisfy the Church history core 
elective for the Bible major. Prerequisites: HUMN 101, 102, and 201 or 
consent of instructor. HIST 431 offered fall term each year; HIST 432 
offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester. 

HIST 450. The Holocaust - A study of the destruction of Europe's 
Jews by the Nazis. This study covers the general topic of anti-Semitism, 
anti-Jewish legislation, the implementation of the Final Solution, and 
the Jewish response. Offered spring term every three years. Three 
semester hours. 

HIST 480. Seminar on Vietnam - A survey of the Vietnam era in 
American history. This course examines precursors in the U.S. and 
Southeast Asia, the Vietnam war era, and the war's legacies to the nation 
and its people. Both historical and psychological issues are examined. 
This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general 
education core. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester 
hours. 

HIST 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings, 
which provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. One to three semester hours. 

HIST 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and 
conferences, which provides for individualized study. One to three 
semester hours. 

HIST 494. Senior Thesis Seminar - Required of all history majors in 
their junior or senior year, the senior thesis seminar provides an 
opportunity for students to produce a senior thesis reflecting original 
research. Working in cooperation with fellow history majors and under 
the joint supervision of the history faculty, students will learn how to 
choose an appropriate research topic, make use of bibliographic tools, 
develop an argument, and organize and write a research paper. Students 
will work on their own projects and serve as peer critics for other 
projects. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour. 

HIST 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered van' from semester to 
semester. One to three semester hours. 



Human Performance 
and Exercise Science 

Area of Education 

The human performance and exercise science program supports the 
following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
libera] arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

■ Students will participate in the activities of a healthy lifestyle such 
as intramurals, intercollegiate sports, musical and theatrical groups, 
student clubs, student government, and other campus-sponsored 
extracurricular endeavors, in preparation for life-long participation 
in similar activities. 

Human performance and exercise science provides a holistic, scholarly 
approach to the study of human movement. Structural and functional 
aspects of movement efficiency, responses of the body to sport and 
exercise, and issues of health-related fitness and wellness are studied. A 
series of core courses prepares students for careers in physical 
education, fitness and wellness, or exercise science. 

Students may choose from three emphases based on their career goals 
or plans for graduate study. The skills and knowledge gained through 
the human performance and exercise science program allow students to 
pursue jobs in school, community, or industrial settings and provide a 
springboard into various graduate programs, including physical therapy, 
occupational therapy and athletic training. 

Teacher licensure in physical education (K-12) is optional. Additional 
courses required for licensure include EDUC 150, 152, 455, and 460 
and PSYC 253. Approval to student teach is granted to students who 
have been fully admitted to the professional level of the teacher 
education program and who maintain eligibility at that level. In addition 
to meeting established minimum grade point averages and Tennessee- 
approved PPST scores, approval to student teach requires: 

1. Maintaining a minimum overall 2.75 grade-point average 

2. Earning a minimum grade of C- in all required teacher 
education courses in the program of study 

3. Obtaining liability insurance 

4. Verification of CPR and/or first aid proficiency 

5. Documentation of emerging teaching competencies in a 
portfolio 

6. Positive review bv the Admission and Retention Committee. 



For additional information about admission into the teacher licensure 
program, see the Education Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



human performance and exercise science 105 



Human Performance and Exercise 
Science major - B.A. or B.S. (38 hrs) 

Core courses (15 hrs) 

HPXS 271 Foundations of Wellness (3 hrs) 
HPXS 308 Measurement and Evaluation (3 hrs) 
HPXS 310 First Aid and CPR (1 hr) 
HPXS 341 Exercise Physiology (4 hrs)* 
HPXS 352 Kinesiology and Biomechanics (4 hrs) 
*Prerequisite BIOL 251 Anatomy and Physiology 

Emphases 

Exercise Science (23 hrs) 

BIOL 250 Anatomy and Physiology (4 hrs) 

CHEM (4 hrs) 

HPXS 333 Nutrition (3 hrs) 

HPXS 401 Research Methods (3 hrs) 

HPXS 436 Exercise in Health and Disease (3 hrs) 

HPXS 491 Field Work (6 hrs) 

Fitness and Wellness (23 hrs) 

BADM 361 Principles of Management (3 hrs) 

BIOL 250 Anatomy and Physiology (4 hrs) 

HPXS 207 Principles of Strength Training (2 hrs) 

HPXS 307 Recreational Leadership and Outdoor Education 

(2 hrs) 
HPXS 401 Research Methods (3 hrs) 
HPXS 436 Exercise in Health and Disease (3 hrs) 
HPXS 491 Field Work (6 hrs) 

Physical Education (23 hrs) 

HPXS 1 04 Swimming or 1 05 Lifeguarding (1 hr) 

HPXS 108 Folk Dance and Rhythmical Activities (1 hr) 

HPXS 151 Fall Season Team Sports (1 hr) 

HPXS 1 52 Spring Season Team Sports (1 hr) 

HPXS 162 Aerobic Fitness (1 hr) 

HPXS 207 Principles of Strength Training (2 hrs) 

HPXS 301 Teaching Individual and Dual Sports (2 hrs) 

HPXS 350 Elementary Physical Education Methods (4 hrs)* 

HPXS 370 Secondary Physical Education Methods (3 hrs)* 

HPXS 404 Organization and Management of Physical Education 

and Sports (3 hrs) 
HPXS 405 Motor Behavior (2 hrs) 
HPXS 406 Adapted Physical Education (2 hrs) 

*HPXS 491 Field Work for 3 hrs may be substituted for either 350 
or 370 for a student not interested in a teaching setting. 



Course Descriptions 



Only courses numbered 104 - 162 fulfill the activity requirement. 
HPXS 101. Fitness for Life - A study of the fundamentals, principles, 
and techniques for development of a lifestyle of wellness and fitness, 
following a holistic approach. The development and implementation of 
a personalized fitness program are included. Offered every term. One 
semester hour. 

HPXS 104. Swimming - A course designed for students with differing 
levels of swimming skills. American Red Cross certification is available 
through Level VII. A student majoring in human performance and 
exercise science may take a proficiency exam to receive credit for this 
course. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour. 

HPXS 105. Lifeguarding - A course designed for students who are 
strong swimmers and proficient in basic swimming strokes. American 
Red Cross certification is available (Human Performance and Exercise 
Science 310b must be taken concurrendy for lifeguard certification). 
Special fee. Offered even fall semesters and even spring semesters each 
year. One semester hour. 



HPXS 108. Folk Dance and Rhythmical Activities - A study of 
rhythmical exercises, elementary steps, and folk dances of various 
countries. Clogging, contras, square, and round dances are included. 
Offered every term. One semester hour. 

HPXS 151. Fall Season Team Sports - Active participation and 
leadership in skills, lead ups, and sports such as volleyball, field hockey, 
soccer, and football. Offered fall term every year. One semester hour. 

HPXS 152. Spring Season Team Sports - Active participation and 
leadership in skills, lead ups, and sports such as basketball, team 
handball, Softball, and ultimate Frisbee. Offered spring term each year. 
One semester hour. 

HPXS 153. Golf and Pickleball - An introduction to basic strokes and 
skills necessary for active participation in golf and pickle ball, including 
game competition and the application of official rules. Offered spring 
term each year. One semester hour. 

HPXS 155. Beginning Badminton and Tennis - An introduction to 
basic strokes, skills, and game competition for beginning students in 
each of these lifetime sports. Offered fall term each year. One semester 
hour. 

HPXS 156. Intermediate Badminton and Tennis - A course 
focusing on the skills and techniques of play for those beyond the level 
of beginners. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour. 

HPXS 158. Snow Skiing - Instruction at a nearby ski resort. The class is 
divided according to level of skill, beginner to advanced. Special fee. 
Transportation not provided. Offered spring term each year. One semester 
hour. 

HPXS 159. Horseback Riding - Instruction at nearby stables on 
gaited horses and English tack for beginners as well as intermediate and 
advanced riders. Special fee. Transportation not provided. Offered 
every term. One semester hour. 

HPXS 162. Aerobic Fitness - Active participation involving but not 
limited to work with stability ball training, water and land aerobics, 
kettle ball workouts, spinning, power stick activities, and workout 
bands. Offered every term. One semester hour. 

HPXS 207. Principles of Strength Training - A study of strength 
training principles focusing on practical application. Students will learn 
to design individual programs in the context of athletics, general fitness, 
and recreation. Training adaptations and other physiological concepts 
will be discussed. This course does not fulfill the Human Performance 
and Exercise Science activity general education requirement. Offered 
spring term even years. Two semester hours. 

HPXS 270. The Science of Athletic Performance - A course 
designed especially for those considering coaching, providing an 
overview of nutritional, physiological, and biomechanical 
considerations. Topics are presented in the context of their impact on 
training and conditioning and athletic performance. Offered spring term 
even years. Three semester hours. 

HPXS 271. Foundations of Wellness - A study of mental, physical, 
and spiritual dimensions of wellness with an emphasis on exercise and 
nutrition. Includes nutritional analysis and exercise prescription. 
Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours 

HPXS 301. Teaching Individual and Dual Sports - A study of the 
knowledge and skills necessary to teach various sports, with an 
emphasis on teaching techniques and the appreciation of lifetime sports. 
Special fee. Open to HPXS majors or by permission of instructor. This 
course does not fulfill the Human Performance and Exercise Science 
activity general education requirement. Offered fall term each year. Two 



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106 human performance and exercise science 



semester hours. 

HPXS 302a. Coaching and Officiating Track and Field - A study of 
coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the 
student for coaching and officiating track and field. Knowledge of the 
rules and regulations is included. Offered spring term odd years. Two 
semester hours. 

HPXS 302b. Coaching and Officiating Basketball - A study of 
coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the 
student for coaching and officiating basketball. Knowledge of the rules 
and regulations is included. Offered fall term each year. Two semester 
hours. 

HPXS 302c. Coaching and Officiating Football - A study of 
coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the 
student for coaching and officiating football. Knowledge of the rules 
and regulations is included. Offered spring term each year. Two 
semester hours. 

HPXS 302d. Coaching and Officiating Softball and Baseball - A 

study of coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to 
prepare the student for coaching and officiating Softball and baseball. 
Knowledge of the rules and regulations is included. Offered fall term each 
year. Two semester hours. 

HPXS 302e. Coaching and Officiating Volleyball - A study of 
coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the 
student for coaching and officiating volleyball. Knowledge of the rules 
and regulations is included. Offered fall term odd years. Two semester 
hours. 

HPXS 302f. Coaching and Officiating Soccer - A study of coaching 
techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the student for 
coaching and officiating soccer. Knowledge of the rules and regulations 
is included. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours. 

HPXS 307. Recreational Leadership and Outdoor Education - A 

study of the administration and leadership of recreational activities and 
outdoor educational pursuits. The course includes experience in such 
activities as camping, hiking, mountain climbing, and orienteering with 
limited practical application. Special fee. Offered fall term most years. 
Two semester hours. 

HPXS 308. Measurement and Evaluation - A focus on the 
development of the knowledge, skills, and procedures necessary for 
testing and evaluating different populations in school, laboratory, or 
field settings. It is recommended that a student complete Mathematics 
213 prior to enrollment in this course. Offered fall term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

HPXS 309. Sports Injuries - A course designed to familiarize the 
student with recognition and management of injuries related to sports 
participation. Also covered are aspects of sports medicine, conditioning, 
strength training, nutrition, and protective equipment. Offered spring 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

HPXS 310a. First Aid and CPR - A course focusing on training in 
basic first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The American Red 
Cross certifications are earned. This course does not fulfill the Human 
Performance and Exercise Science activity general education 
requirement. Special fee. Offered ever)' term. One semester hour. 

HPXS 310b. CPR for the Professional Rescuer - A study of infant, 
child, and two-person adult CPR. This certification is a prerequisite to 
obtaining Red Cross Certification in lifeguarding (Human Performance 
and Exercise Science 205) and should be taken concurrently. This 
course does not fulfill the Human Performance and Exercise Science 
activity general education requirement. Special fee. Offered fall term 
even years and spring term even years. One semester hour. 



HPXS 333. Nutrition - A more advanced study of basic nutrition 
concepts, building on content covered in HPXS 101 Fitness for Life 
and HPXS 271 Foundations of Wellness. Nutrients and their 
requirements, sources, digestions, and roles in body function are 
covered with emphasis on their relation to exercise and athletics. 
Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours. 

HPXS 341. Exercise Physiology - A study of the physiological and 
biochemical responses of the human body to exercise. The basic 
concepts of physiology are applied to sports performance, personal 
wellness, and aging. Prerequisite: BIOL 250. Offered fall term each year. 
Four semester hours. 

HPXS 350. Elementary Physical Education Methods - A practical 
study of methods, materials, techniques, and skills in teaching physical 
education to elementary students (grades K-6). Age-appropriate motor 
development; motor learning, assessment; teaching of movement 
concepts and basic motor skills, sport and team activities, classroom 
management, group activities, wellness; and lesson plan preparation and 
presentation are several components of this course. Field experience 
and portfolio preparation included. Enrollment limited to students 
admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program or 
permission of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Four semester 
hours. 

HPXS 352. Kinesiology and Biomechanics - An introduction to the 
study of the internal and external forces which act on the human body 
and the effects these forces produce, with special emphasis on the 
musculoskeletal system, its development, and its involvement during 
movement. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours. 

HPXS 370. Secondary Physical Education and Wellness Methods 

- A practical study of methods, materials, techniques, and skills in 
teaching physical education and wellness to secondary students (grades 
7-12). Age appropriate development; assessment; teaching of lifetime 
fitness/wellness and lifetime leisure sports and activities; classroom 
management; and lesson and unit plan preparation and presentation are 
several components of this course. Field experience and portfolio 
preparation are included. Enrollment limited to students admitted to the 
professional level of the teacher education program or permission of 
the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

HPXS 380. Sports Promotion, Finance, and Marketing - A course 
designed to provide students with a practical application of strategies 
and techniques used in sports promotion, marketing, public relations, 
finance, and fund raising in both the sports and recreation industries. 
Practicum included. Offered spring term even years. Three semester 
hours. 

HPXS 381. Sports Facilities and Management - A study of current 
issues and trends in sports management, facility design and 
maintenance, and event management. Practicum included. Offered 
spring term odd years. Three semester hours. 

HPXS 401. Research Methods - An investigation of research 
techniques and methods used in various types of research and an 
introduction to science-based databases, culminating in the presentation 
of a research proposal. Prerequisite: HPXS 308 or permission of 
instructor. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours. 

HPXS 404. Organization and Management of Physical Education 
and Sports - A study of school problems, including curriculum 
development; program organization and supervision; and school, 
amateur, and professional sports. Offered spring term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

HPXS 405. Motor Behavior - A study of motor control, motor 
growth and development, and motor learning. Classical and current 
theories and laws will be presented. Practical application of these 



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humanities 107 



principles will be included especially as related to movement and skill 
development. Offered fall term odd years. Two semester hours. 

HPXS 406. Adapted Physical Education - A study of normal and 
abnormal growth and development of persons with disabilities. 
Teaching techniques, programs, and services for each disability are 
presented. Practical experience is expected as part of the course. 
Offered fall term even years. Two semester hours. 

HPXS 436. Exercise in Health and Disease - A study of the 
relationship of exercise to the components of wellness and healthy 
lifestyles, including an in-depth look at the interrelationship of exercise 
with coronary heart disease, obesity, and nutrition. Exercise prescription 
for the healthy and diseased is explored. Prerequisite: HPXS 341 . 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

HPXS 440. Health and Physical Education Methods - Reading, 
discussion, and application of fitness and health concerns of children, 
Kindergarten through Grade Eight. The course includes instruction and 
practice related to physical activity and rhythmical activities. Emphasis is 
on integration of health and physical education topics and activities into 
the school curriculum, grades K-8. Enrollment is limited to students 
admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program. 
Not for Human Performance and Exercise Science majors. Offered 
spring term each year. Two semester hours. 

HPXS 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings 
which provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. Faculty tutorial required. One to three semester hours. 

HPXS 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and 
conferences which provides for individualized study. Faculty tutorial 
required. One to three semester hours. 

HPXS 491. Field Work - A practicum experience that involves the 
student in a position of supervising/ teaching/leading individuals in a 
school, community, wellness center, or hospital setting. Offered every 
term. One to six semester hours. 

HPXS 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Not offered every year. One to three 
semester hours. 



Humanities 

Area of Humane Learning 

The humanities major supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts.... 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life dirough . . . 
appreciation for the arts . . . and preparation for graduate studies 
and a rewarding career or profession. 

The purpose of the major in humanities is to allow students to pursue 
an interdisciplinary course of study. Although the major is not 
structured as a prevocational course, it does provide a broad 
undergraduate education from which a student can move into teaching 
or into several graduate programs including law. It focuses upon the 
great ideas that have shaped history and created contemporary 
civilizations. 

Graduates with a major in humanities will demonstrate the ability to (1) 
plan, create, and carry out an interdisciplinary major in the humanities 
designed to meet individual interests and career goals; (2) design and 
carry out an extensive interdisciplinary research or creative project 
under the guidance of a faculty committee recruited by the student; (3) 
make connections between academic disciplines and between those 
disciplines and their Christian faith. 



Humanities major - B.A. (24 hrs) 

Requirements for the humanities major are 24 hours of junior and 
senior level course work, including at least three hours of Humanities 
490, and approved courses from among the disciplines of history, 
literature, philosophy, fine arts, foreign language, and Bible. A few 
selected 200 level courses have also been approved for inclusion in this 
major; the humanities advisers have a listing of the specific courses. The 
humanities major is available only as a Bachelor of Arts degree; 
therefore, foreign language through the intermediate level is required. 

The humanities major offers specialization in one or more of the 
following fields: literature, history, fine arts, foreign language (Spanish 
or French only), and Bible. With advisement, this major may satisfy the 
better part of the "two concentrations" required for middle grades 
licensure. 



Each student who selects a major in humanities works with an adviser, 
usually the Director of Humanities, to design a program to meet the 
needs and desires of the individual student. The student working with 
an advisory committee plans the HUMN 490 course. 

Students with a humanities major are encouraged to fulfill requirements 
for a minor from the disciplines of Bible, English, fine arts, foreign 
language, history, philosophy, or educational studies. However, students 
who choose a minor in other fields (or who choose not to do a minor) 
may still select a major in humanities. There is no humanities minor. 



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108 humanities 



Humanities major appropriate for 
elementary education students 
seeking licensure 

The recommended courses making up the humanities major for 
elementary education students are listed below. For students seeking 
public school licensure, the courses for the Humanities major must be 
approved by both the Director of Humanities and the Director of 
Teacher Certification. 

The humanities major requires a minimum of 24 hours of junior/ senior 
(and approved sophomore) level courses including HUMN 490. The 
option outlined below requires 27 hours, but 6 of these hours are also 
part of the program of licensure. Foreign language through intermediate 
level is required. 

History (12 hrs) 

Required: 

HIST 209 United States History Survey I (3 hrs; required for 
licensure) 

At least three of the following (no more than two at the 200 level): 
HIST 206 History of Islam (3 hrs) 
HIST 210 United States History Survey II (3 hrs) 
HIST 306 Medieval European Society (3 hrs) 
HIST 324 Roman History through the Pax Romana (3 hrs) 
HIST 334 Issues in 20 th -century Europe (3 hrs) 
HIST 377 The Middle Period (U.S. 1840-1880) (3 hrs) 
HIST 450 The Holocaust (3 hrs) 
SOCL 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs) 

English (12 hrs) 

Required: 

ENGL 311 Advanced Grammar (3 hrs) 
ENGL 354 Children's Literature (3 hrs; required for 
licensure) 

At least two of the following: 

ENGL 304 Survey of American Literature (3 hrs) 

ENGL 305 Survey of American Literature (3 hrs) 

ENGL 361 Novel (3 hrs) 

ENGL 362 African-American Narrative Literature (3 hrs) 

ENGL 363 Appalachian Literature (3 hrs) 

ENGL 364 Fiction of C. S. Lewis (3 hrs) 

ENGL 402 Short Story (3 hrs) 

ENGL 415 Southern Renascence/Harlem Renaissance 

(3 hrs) 
ENGL 434 The Age of Wordsworth: Poetry, Prose, Politics 

(3 hrs) 

Humanities (3 hrs) 

Required: 

HUMN 490 Reading and Research in Humane Learning 

(3 hrs) 
(The HUMN 490 committee should include one faculty 
member from the Education area and one faculty member 
from the humanities faculty.) 



Middle Grades Humanities 
teacher licensure programs 

HUMN 101, 102, 201, and 202 (24 hrs) 

HUMN 490 Reading and Research in Humane Learning (3 hrs) 
HIST 209 and 210 United States History Survey I and II (6 hrs) 
15 hours of 300 and 400 level course work from among the 
disciplines of literature, history, fine arts, foreign language 
(Spanish or French only), and Bible (15 hrs) 



For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



Course Descriptions 

HUMN 091. College Reading and Study Skills - An integrated 
approach to college-level reading and study strategies, including 
concentration, comprehension, note-taking, test-taking, and time 
management, designed to accompany Humanities 101 and 102. Not 
applicable toward the 128 hours required for a degree. Offered every 
term. Two semester hours. 

HUMN 093. Fundamental College Writing - A course providing 
extra instruction for students who demonstrate writing skills below the 
college level. The course includes work in basic sentence structure, 
paragraph structure, and grammar. Students also practice organizing and 
developing essays. Not applicable toward the 128 hours required for a 
degree. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour. 

HUMN 101. Humanities - An interdisciplinary course involving 
extensive reading in history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts, as well 
as concentrated work in composition. Special attention is given to 
instruction in writing and to the history of civilization from prehistory 
to the fourteenth century. Humanities 101W — Critical Thinking and 
Writing in the Humanities. Humanities 101S — Discussion of the 
Humanities. Enrollment in 101W and 101S must be concurrent unless 
repeating the course (or in cases where the student already has 
appropriate credit through transfer, AP, etc.). Students must earn a C- 
or better in HUMN 101W (beginning fall semester 2003) in order to 
advance to HUMN 202W and to meet the writing requirements for 
graduation. At the writing professor's discretion, students with more 
severe writing difficulties may be required also to complete successfully 
(i.e., pass with a C- or better) HUMN 093 when repeating HUMN 
101W. HUMN 101S offered fall term each year. HUMN 101W offered 
fall and spring term each year. Six semester hours (101W for three 
semester hours; 101S for three semester hours). 

HUMN 102. Humanities - An interdisciplinary course involving 
extensive reading in history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts. Special 
attention is given to world literature and to philosophy from the 
fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Offered spring term each year. 
Six semester hours. 

HUMN 200. Humanities European Study Tour - A study tour of 
ten European countries. Visits are made to sites of both historical and 
cultural significance. In addition to the travel, students complete writing 
assignments and fulfill all the academic obligations outlined by the tour 
professor. Humanities 200 may be taken in lieu of HUMN 202S (three 
hours). Prerequisites: HUMN 101 and HUMN 102. Offered every 
summer. Three semester hours. 

HUMN 201. Humanities - A continuation of the program of HUMN 
101-102 from the eighteenth century through the nineteenth century in 
which special attention is given to the fine arts and the history of 
civilization. Offered fall term each year. Six semester hours. 

HUMN 202. Humanities - A continuation of the program of HUMN 
101, 102, and 201 with special attention to argumentative writing and 
world literature since 1900. HUMN 202W — Argumentative Writing in 
the Humanities. (Prerequisite for HUMN 202W: C- or better in HUMN 
101W). HUMN 202S — Discussion of the Humanities. Enrollment in 
202W and 202S must be concurrent unless repeating the course or 
taking HUMN 200 in place of 202S (or in cases where the student 
already has appropriate credit through transfer). Offered spring term 
each year. Six semester hours (202W for three semester hours; 202S for 
three semester hours). 



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journalism 109 



Note: HUMN 101 is a required course of study fall semester for all 
freshmen working toward a B.A., B.S., or B.S.N, degree. Except for 
those experiencing serious academic difficulties, students should 
continue in HUMN 102, 201, and 202 in subsequent semesters. Once a 
student enrolls in the daytime program at Milligan College, still needing 
humanities courses as part of the core, those courses must be taken at 
Milligan College. 

HUMN 285. Japanese Literature (in translation) - A study of the 
character and culture of the Japanese people by analyzing their society 
and history through readings of twentieth-century Japanese fiction. 
(Readings are by Japanese authors in English translation.) This course 
fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education 
core. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

HUMN 290. Independent Study - Individual studv to enable the 
student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an 
individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. 
Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours. 

HUMN 380. Jesus in the Arts - An exploration of the creative images 
of Jesus throughout the centuries, drawing examples from the literary, 
dramatic, visual, musical, kinetic, and cinematic arts, seeking a deeper 
appreciation for the arts in the life of the church and for the impact of- 
the image of Jesus in people's lives. Offered periodically. Three 
semester hours. 

HUMN 490. Reading and Research in Humane Learning - An 

individualized course of study to be determined by the student and an 
advisory committee. At least three hours of Humanities 490 are required 
for every humanities major. Three to six semester hours per semester. 

HUMN 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. One to three semester hours. 



Journalism 



Area of Performing, Visual, and Communicative Arts 

Communications major - B.A. or B.S. 
(39 hrs) 

Journalism emphasis 

See "Communications" for more information about the 
communications major with journalism emphasis. 



Journalism minor (20 hrs) 

The journalism minor emphasizes skills and professional knowledge for 
students who are pursuing majors in other academic areas. This minor 
would be appropriate for students who have a strong interest in 
journalism but wish to graduate with a major in another field and for 
students who may wish to apply their major area of study to writing for 
publication in non-academic settings such as newspapers and 
magazines. 



COMM 205 Reporting for Public Media (3 hrs) 
COMM 316 The Press in Society (3 hrs) 
COMM 331 Specialty Reporting and Writing OR 

COMM 335 Editing and Style (3 hrs) 
COMM 431 Feature Writing (3 hrs) 
COMM 432 Communications Law and Ethics (3 hrs) 
COMM 481 Print Media Lab AND/OR 

COMM 491 Internship (total of 2 hrs) 
COMM elective (3 hrs) 



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110 language arts | legal studies 



Language Arts 

Area of Humane Learning 

The language arts major supports the following goal of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts . . . and to understand a significant body of material in 
their major fields of study- 
Graduates who earn a language arts major go on to teach in public and 
private schools, to study library science/information technology, and to 
work in marketing, customer assistance, and other aspects of the 
business world. 

The course of study in language arts is designed to enable students (1) 
to read literary texts with appreciation and understanding; (2) to write 
clearly and effectively; and (3) to acquire a broad knowledge base in 
literature, language, and theatre arts which will enable them to pursue a 
career in middle grades education or other related fields. 

There is no language arts minor. 



Legal Studies 

Area of Business 

The legal studies minor supports the following goals of Milligan 
College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the social sciences, and to understand a significant 
body of material in their major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through stewardship 
of resources and preparation for graduate studies and a rewarding 
career or profession. 



Business Administration major - 
B.A. or B.S. (39 hrs) 

Legal studies emphasis 

See "Business Administration" for more information about the business 
administration major with legal studies emphasis. 



Language Arts major - B.A. (33 hrs) 

Six hours of literature from HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202 (6 hrs) 
Six hours of foreign language (French or Spanish only for those 

pursuing middle grades licensure) at the intermediate level or 

higher (6 hrs) 
ENGL 304 or 305 Survey of American Literature (3 hrs) 
ENGL 31 1 Advanced Grammar (3 hrs) 
ENGL 402 Short Story or 363 Appalachian Literature or 365 

Literature by Women (3 hrs) 
ENGL 460 Elizabethan Drama or 461 Jacobean Drama (3 hrs) 
ENGL, THEA or foreign language electives at the 300 or 400 level 

(Those seeking middle grades licensure should select ENGL 

354 as one of the electives.) (9 hrs) 
The language arts major is available only as a Bachelor of Arts 

degree; therefore, foreign language through the intermediate 

level is required. 



Language Arts major 
(Elementary and Middle Grades 
licensure) 

Six hours of literature from HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202 (6 hrs) 
Six hours of foreign language (FREN or SPAN only) at the 

intermediate level or higher (6 hrs) 
ENGL 304 Survey of American Literature (3 hrs) 
ENGL 31 1 Advanced Grammar (3 hrs) 
ENGL 354 Children's Literature (3 hrs) 
ENGL 363 Appalachian Literature or 365 Literature by Women or 

402 
Short Story (3 hrs) 

ENGL 460 Elizabethan Drama or 461 Jacobean Drama (3 hrs) 
ENGL, THEA, or foreign language electives at the 300 or 400 

level (6 hrs) 

For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



Legal Studies minor (18 hrs) 

The minor in legal studies is designed for students interested in 
acquiring a deeper understanding of the modern legal system. It is 
ideally suited for those students interested in attending law school 
and/or pursuing a career in the legal profession. 
LS 310 Philosophy of Law (3 hrs) 
LS 420 Law and Christianity (3 hrs) 
POLS 202 American National Government (3 hrs) 
Nine hours of electives chosen from the following: LS 210, 304, 
320, 330, 340, 355, 491, and 495; BADM 321 and 322; and 
POLS 203 and 350 

Course descriptions 

LS 210. Legal Research and Writing - An introduction to basic legal 
research and writing, using a combination of readings, workshops, 
practice assignments, and a comprehensive project. Students will access 
statutes, cases, and secondary sources utilizing both traditional and 
computerized research methods. Research assignments culminate with a 
challenging project addressing several issues of law with the results 
presented in a legal memorandum. Offered periodically. Three semester 
hours. 

LS 304. Law and Globalization - An examination of the function of 
law in the globalization era both domestically and internationally. 
Emphasis will be given to understanding the importance and influence 
of governmental institutions and specific laws upon individual societies, 
in particular, developing countries. This course fulfills the ethnic 
studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered 
spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

LS 310. Philosophy of Law - A detailed study of judicial decision- 
making and its relationship to the handling of disputes at different levels 
of the legal structure and various stages of the legal process. Using case- 
law materials, the techniques of legal reasoning and styles of legal 
thinking, along with the ways in which judicial decisions are able to 
respond to the demands of social change, are investigated. 
Consideration is given to techniques of reading legal texts, strategies of 
interpretation, legal reasoning, decision-making, and persuasion. 
Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours. 



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mathematics 111 



LS 320. Constitutional Law - A survey of the historical development 
of the American Constitution with emphasis on the role of the judicial 
branch of the government as arbiter in determining the respective limits 
on national and state power, in protecting the individual against that 
national and state activity which offends the Bill of Rights and other 
constitutional guarantees of liberty and property, and in securing civil 
rights. Selected Supreme Court cases will be studied. Offered 
periodically. Three semester hours. 

LS 330. Family Law - An examination of the relationship between the 
American family, the law, and the church. Topics include the legal 
definitions of marriage and family; the rights and obligations within the 
family; the role of church and government in marriage and family life; 
the dissolution of marriage and related issues such as the distribution of 
marital assets, alimony, child custody, visitation, and support; the issues 
of paternity, adoption and surrogacy will also be explored. Offered fall 
term alternate years. 

LS 340. Juvenile Justice - An exploration of all phases of the 
contemporary juvenile justice system and an examination of the nature 
of delinquency, classifications of juvenile offenders, alternative 
explanations for juvenile misconduct, juvenile courts and juvenile rights, 
treatment, and corrections. Major court rulings that have shaped 
contemporary juvenile justice are presented as well. Students also have 
the opportunity to observe parts of the juvenile justice system first-hand 
by attending a juvenile court session and visiting a correctional facility 
for adjudicated delinquents. Offered spring term alternate years. Three 
semester hours. 

LS 355. Criminal Law and Procedure - A broad introduction to the 
American criminal justice system. Topics include how crimes are legally 
defined, legal defenses, and Constitutional limitations. The three major 
components of the criminal justice system are examined: law 
enforcement, the judicial system, and corrections. In particular, the 
focus is on each component's relationship to substantive and procedural 
law. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

LS 420. Law and Christianity - A study of the relationship that exists 
between Christianity and the law. Students examine the issues of how 
human laws relate to God's laws, the foundational principles of a 
biblical jurisprudence, the nature of responsibility and punishment, 
mercy and judgment. Attention is paid to whether law can truly be 
considered a calling and the unique responsibility Christian legal 
professionals have in society. Prerequisite: LS 110 or permission of 
instructor. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

LS 491. Internship - A supervised field work in various law offices and 
legal agencies, designed to give the student broad exposure and initial 
practical competencies. Three to six semester hours. 

LS 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, 
independent research and writing in areas not included in the regular 
course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. 
One to three semester hours. 



Mathematics 

Area of Scientific Learning 

The mathematics major supports the following goals of Milligan 
College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

The major is designed for students interested in careers in mathematics, 
teaching, and industry. It will prepare students for employment in 
government or industry, teaching in high schools or middle schools, or 
for graduate study in mathematics. 

Graduates with a major in mathematics are expected to (1) demonstrate 
proficiency in the core areas of knowledge in mathematics which 
includes calculus (analysis), algebra, and logic; (2) demonstrate analytical 
thinking and problem solving skills relevant to the analysis of abstract 
mathematical ideas and the solving of applied mathematical problems; 
(3) demonstrate oral and written communication skills necessary to 
convey abstract mathematical ideas clearly to their peers and others who 
require such information; (4) acquire the knowledge and skills necessary 
for a variety of careers which use mathematics as well as receive 
preparation sufficient for further study in mathematics. 



Mathematics major - B.A. (30 hrs) 

MATH 21 1 and 212 PreCalculus/Calculus I and II (8 hrs) 
MATH 301 An Introduction to Mathematical Logic (3 hrs) 
MATH 303 Multivariable Calculus (4 hrs) 
MATH 307 Linear Algebra (3 hrs) 
MATH 495 Seminar (3 hrs) 

Nine additional hours of math courses at the 200 level or above 
As a Bachelor of Arts degree, foreign language through the 
intermediate level is required. 

Within one semester of completing the core courses (MATH 211, 212, 
301, 303, and 307), students must take and pass a core exam. The core 
exam will cover material from each of the five core courses. Credit may 
not be received for both MATH 213 and 314. 



Mathematics major - B.S. (36 hrs) 

MATH 211 and 212 PreCalculus/Calculus I and II (8 hrs) 

MATH 301 An Introduction to Mathematical Logic (3 hrs) 

MATH 303 Multivariable Calculus (4 hrs) 

MATH 307 Linear Algebra (3 hrs) 

MATH 495 Seminar (3 hrs) 

Fifteen additional hours of math courses at the 200 level or above 

Other required course: CIS 211 Programming I or higher (3 hrs) 

Those pursuing teacher licensure must choose MATH 213 or 314; 214; 
and 304 as 9 of the 15 elective hours. For additional information about 
the teacher licensure program, including a list of courses required for 
licensure, see the Education: Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



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112 mathematics 



Within one semester of completing the core courses (MATH 211, 212, 
301, 303, and 307), students must take and pass a core exam. The core 
exam will cover material from each of the five core courses. Credit may 
not be received for both MATH 213 and 314. 



hypothesis testing with small and large samples, linear regression and 
correlation, and an introduction to the analysis of variance. Prerequisite: 
High school algebra or equivalent. Offered every term. Three semester 
hours. 



Mathematics minor (18 hrs) 

MATH 21 land 212 PreCalculus/Calculus I and II (8 hrs) 

MATH 303 Multivariable Calculus (4 hrs) 

Six additional hours of math at the 200 level or above 



Course Descriptions 

MATH 090. Developmental Mathematics - A review of basic 
arithmetic and an introduction to beginning topics in algebra. This 
course attempts to build connections between arithmetic and algebra 
and to ease the transition to a class in College Algebra or other college 
level work. It also includes topics in beginning statistics and geometry. 
It is not applicable toward the 128 hours required for a degree. Students 
are not allowed to withdraw from MATH 090. Offered every term. Two 
semester hours. 

MATH 107. Principles of Mathematics - An introduction to a variety 
of mathematical fields including analysis, algebra, probability and 
statistics, logic, number theory, and topology, together with an analysis 
of some of the major contributions mathematics has made to 
civilization. Offered ever)' term. Three semester hours. 

MATH 111. College Algebra I - A study of algebraic methods; the 
natural numbers, the integers, the rationals, and the real numbers; 
algebraic expressions including polynomials, rational expressions, 
exponents and radicals, equations and inequalities; and function theory 
including domain, range, composition, inverses, and graphing 
techniques. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

MATH 112. College Algebra II and Trigonometry - A continuation 
of Mathematics 111 including the studv of exponential and logarithmic 
functions, vectors, and complex numbers. Also included is an in-depth 
presentation of trigonometric functions: their values, graphs, inverses, 
and identities; with application to triangles, circles, and some mechanics. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1 1 1 or equivalent. Offered spring term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

MATH 153. Fundamental Concepts I - A study of the real number 
system and its field properties. As tools for the development of these 
topics, a study is made of set theory and various numeration systems. 
Attention is given to problem solving; sets, whole numbers, and 
numeration; whole number operations and properties; whole number 
computation; number theory; fractions; decimals, ratio, proportion, and 
percent. Teaching strategies for these topics will be introduced. 
Prerequisite: 2 years of high school algebra or Math 090. Not applicable 
to a math major or minor. Offered spring term each vear. Three 
semester hours. 

MATH 211. PreCalculus/Calculus I - A short preparatory study of 
functions of one variable, in particular, trigonometric, logarithmic, and 
exponential, leading into an emphasis of focus on limits, derivatives, 
and integrals including their definition, calculation, and application. 
Prerequisite: High school algebra. Offered fall term each year. Four 
semester hours. 

MATH 212. Calculus II - A study of transcendental functions, their 
differentiation and integration, formal integration, the conies, Taylor's 
formula, and infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH 21 1. Offered spring 
term each year. Four semester hours. 

MATH 213. Statistics - A study of data analysis and statistical 
inference. Topics include descriptive statistics, an introduction to 
probability, continuous and discrete random variables, probability 
distributions, basic sampling techniques, confidence intervals, 



MATH 214. Discrete Mathematics - A studv of discrete 
mathematical structures such as sets, permutations, relations, graphs, 
and finite state machines as well as a variety of mathematics used to 
studv these structures including recursion, induction, counting, 
algorithms, and finite calculus (difference equations). This course is 
especially recommended for those whose major or minor is either 
computer information systems or computer science. Offered spring 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

MATH 253. Fundamental Concepts II A continuation of the studv 
of the real number system. Topics include rational and real numbers; 
statistics; probability; measurement; geometry; and algebra. Some 
teaching strategies and methods will be presented. Prerequisite: A grade 
of C or better in MATH 153. Not applicable to a math major or minor. 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

MATH 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the 
student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an 
individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. 
Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours. 

MATH 301. An Introduction to Mathematical Logic - A study of 
prepositional logic in abstract mathematics and an introduction to the 
basic structures of modern mathematics including set theory, cardinality, 
induction, relations, and functions, with particular emphasis on the 
reading and writing of proofs. Prerequisite: MATH 212 or consent of 
instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

MATH 303. Multivariable Calculus - A studv of three dimensional 
analytic geometry, curves, calculus of functions of several variables, line 
integrals, and differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 212. Offered 
fall term each year. Four semester hours. 

MATH 304. Modern Geometry - A study of axiomatic systems, logic, 
and Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries from an historical 
viewpoint. Euclidean incidence, betweenness, congruence, and 
separation are studied along with models for non-Euclidean geometries 
and their impact on mathematical thought. Recommended for 
prospective teachers of mathematics. Offered fall term odd vears. Three 
semester hours. 

MATH 307. Linear Algebra - A studv of vector spaces, matrices and 
linear systems, determinants, inner products, and linear transformations. 
Prerequisite: MATH 212. Offered fall term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

MATH 308. Modern Algebra - A study of algebraic structures such as 
rings, fields, groups, and integral domains. Recommended for math 
majors. Prerequisite: MATH 301. Offered spring term odd years. Three 
semester hours. 

MATH 309. Differential Equations - A study of the differential 
equations, their meaning, types of solutions, and uses. Recommended 
for math majors and minors interested in chemistry and applied math. 
Prerequisite: MATH 303 and 307. Offered spring term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

MATH 310. Topology - A study of open sets, closed sets, functions, 
continuity, compactness, connectedness, product spaces, and 
homeomorphism. Prerequisite: MATH 301. Offered as needed. Three 
semester hours. 

MATH 314. Probability and Statistics I - A study of probability 
distributions and inferential as well as descriptive statistics. Topics such 
as frequency tables, measures of central tendency and dispersion, 



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missions 113 



confidence intervals, and tests of hypothesis are included. Prerequisite: 
MATH 303. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours. 

MATH 315. Probability and Statistics II - A continuation of 
Mathematics 314 which includes an introduction to decision theory, 
estimation, and hypothesis testing, as well as a discussion of ANOV, 
non-parametric methods, and other tests. In addition, the course 
includes an introduction to computer based statistical packages. 
Prerequisite: MATH 314. Offered fall term as needed. Three semester 
hours. 

MATH 351. Mathematical Modeling - A survey of the construction 
and development of mathematical models used in science and industry. 
The mathematics developed contributes to an understanding of the 
model as well as the associated scientific problem that is approximate. 
Prerequisites: MATH 307 and 309. Offered spring term even years. 
Three semester hours. 

MATH 408. Numerical Analysis - A study which enables one to 
write mathematical processes such as integration, differentiation, matrix 
inversion, and estimation of roots, with arithmetic operations. Study 
includes orientation toward machine computation. Prerequisites: 
MATH 307 and 309 and a computer language. Offered fall term even 
years. Three semester hours. 

MATH 411. Introduction to Real Analysis - A study of the algebraic 
and topological properties of the real numbers, functions of a real 
variable, continuity, differentiation, convergency of sequences of 
functions, Lebesque measure and integration, Riemann-Stieltjes 
integration, and general measures. Prerequisites: MATH 301 and 303. 
Offered fall term as needed. Three semester hours. 

MATH 412. Introduction to Complex Analysis - An expansion of 
calculus into the complex numbers. An introduction into complex 
integration, path integrals, the Cauchy Integral formula, Morera's 
theorem, Liouville's theorem, calculus of residues, conformal mapping, 
Taylor and Laurent Series expansions, applications. Prerequisite: 
MATH 303. Offered spring term as needed. Three semester hours. 

MATH 490. Independent Study - Individual work in mathematics 
under the direct supervision of an instructor. Prerequisite: twenty-four 
hours of mathematics and consent of the instructor. Offered as needed. 
One to three semester hours. 

MATH 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. Offered fall term even years. One to three semester hours. 



Missions 

Area of Biblical Learning 

Missions service to the global church has always been central to the 
educational mission and purpose of Milligan College, whether that 
service takes place locally or in more distant regions of the world. For 
persons whose primary commitment is to the mission mandate of the 
church, the College "provides opportunities for education in Bible . . .' 
which are "shaped by a Christian world new." 



The emphasis in missions is direcdy tied to the following College 
objectives as it 1) strengthens students in their "Positive, Personal 
Christian Faith That Jesus is Lord and Savior" through class studies and 
interactions with the College community; 2) deepens their 
"Commitment to Follow the Teachings of the Christian Scripture in 
One's Personal and Social Ethics" by challenging them to play a 
personal role in responding to the missions mandate of the church; 3) 
cultivates their "Capacity to Recognize and Assume Responsibility in 
Society" when they encounter missionaries on furlough via the College's 
Visiting Missionary program, participate in short-term missions trips, 
complete the required internship, and in other ways encounter the 
needs of the world; and 4) refines their "Knowledge, Meaning, and 
Application of Sound Scholarship" when they examine and analyze 
both their faith and their knowledge of the world via classes and more 
informal campus activities. 

The course of missions study at Milligan College is designed primarily to 
prepare people for missions' leadership ministry in the church. For this 
reason, its strength has long resided in its interdisciplinary structure, 
offering students a wide diversity of missions options via examples 
from church history, more contemporary situations, and internship 
placements. The emphasis is a part of the Bible major since an 
understanding of the universe and one's own place in it is predicated 
upon an understanding of God's purposes as revealed in the scriptures. 
However, because effective missionary ministry also entails an 
understanding of human nature, missions study at Milligan College 
incorporates a solid foundation in the social sciences. It is this unique 
combination of the two disciplines — Bible and sociology — which 
comprises the core of Milligan's missions emphasis. 

Milligan College expects those who graduate with a missions track to 1) 
be prepared for service in a missions leadership role in the church; 2) be 
able, in culturally appropriate ways, to prepare and preach sermons or 
teach lessons which have solid scriptural content; 3) have a good 
foundation in biblical, church historical, social, and practical studies for 
lifelong learning; 4) be well-prepared to pursue seminary or graduate 
education; and 5) be a good Christian example of a missions-minded 
student of scripture. Emphases of spiritual dependence upon God, solid 
academic study including serious study of the Bible and the social 
sciences and practices of both integrity and effectiveness highlight the 
lives of those persons who complete tine missions emphasis. 



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114 music 



Bible major - B.A. (37-38 hrs) 

Missions track 

For information about the Bible major with the missions track, see 
"Bible." The program of study in the Bible major with a missions 
emphasis leads to the B.A. degree, which requires the study of a foreign 
language through the intermediate level. Because it is interdisciplinary in 
nature, the missions curriculum includes both a major and a minor. 
Furthermore, students who wish to add to this program of study may, 
in consultation with their faculty advisers and respective faculty chairs, 
work toward a double major and/or a double minor. 



Missions minor (21 hrs) 

BIBL 201 Jesus in the Gospels (3 hrs) 

BIBL 211 Old Testament Images of God (3 hrs) 

Three additional hours of New Testament courses 

Three additional hours of Old Testament courses 

CMIN 250-253 Practical Ministries Colloquium A - D (2 hrs) 

CMIN 270 Introduction to Christian Missions or 271 History of 

Christian Mssions (3 hrs) 
HIST 275 Selected Topics in the History of the Reformation of 

the Nineteenth Century (1 hr) 
SOCL 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs) 



Music 



Area of Performing, Visual, and Communicative Arts 

The primary goal of the Music Area is to produce well-trained musicians 
who enjoy music and music making while also viewing music as a way 
to enhance and improve the quality of life. The music curriculum at 
Milligan seeks to produce life-long learners and lovers of music, as well 
as accomplished performers and avid music consumers. Within the 
scope of the above goal are two main areas — performance and 
appreciation — expressed in the following objectives: 

1. Performance 

" The student demonstrates evidence of an exposure to a 
variety of styles and performance media. 

■ The student demonstrates a synthesis of musical learning. 

■ The student demonstrates the ability to communicate 
effectively through music. 

2. Appreciation 

■ The student demonstrates an appreciation of a variety of 
musical tastes and styles. 

■ The student demonstrates an understanding of the 
fundamental elements involved in the creative process of 
musical composition. 

■ The student demonstrates the ability to listen with 
understanding. 

Applied music 

Areas of applied music offered at Milligan College include voice, piano, 
guitar, organ, brass, woodwinds, strings, and percussion instruments. All 
areas of applied study are available to all students at Milligan College. 

Ensembles 

Choral ensembles include Concert Choir, Heritage, and Milligan 
Women's Chorale. Instrumental ensembles include Brass Ensemble, 
Civic Band (performance with the Johnson City Community Concert 
Band), Jazz Ensemble, Johnson City Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra, 
Pep Band, Jazz Combo, and String Quartet. All ensembles are open to 
the entire Milligan College community. Some require an audition. 

Admission to program 

In order to be appropriately placed in the music program at Milligan 
College, a prospective student must 

■ Meet all entrance requirements of the College; 

■ Satisfactorily complete a personal interview and audition with 
members of the music faculty or submit an audio or video 
performance on an instrument or voice; 

■ Take an examination in ear training and elementary theory to 
determine entry level. 

The personal audition and interview will allow the faculty to become 
acquainted with each prospective candidate, and will give an idea of 
future potential for success in the music program. Auditions are 
scheduled through the Music Office (423.461.8723) and are held in 
Seeger Chapel. Students with little or no musical experience will be 
enrolled in MUSC 141 Basic Music Reading Skills. All others will be 
placed in MUSC 143 Basic Music Theory/ Ear Training. 

Grade policy for majors/minors 

Music majors and minors must achieve a minimum grade in the 
following core music courses: 

MUSC 143 andl44 Basic Theory/Ear Training: C 

MUSC 363 Basic Conducting: C 

MUSC 367 and 368 Music History or MUSC 265 Music History 

Survey: C 

Applied Lessons: B 
When a student's grade falls below the required minimum, the student 
will have to repeat the course until the minimum grade is reached. 



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music 115 



General Music Studies - B.A. (38 hrs) 

The general music studies curriculum requires a core of music courses, 
and an emphasis in either jazz studies or applied study. Students who 
select this major may wish to teach music privately in a studio, pursue a 
college teaching career, or a performing career. Completion of a foreign 
language through the intermediate level is required. This degree is not a 
substitute for a music education degree. 

Applied music study for the general music studies major may be in 
voice, piano, organ, guitar, brass, woodwinds, strings, or percussion. 
Either the principal or the secondary applied area for the general music 
studies major must be piano, unless a proficiency (MUSC 207) in piano 
is demonstrated. All general music studies majors whose principal 
instrument is piano must enroll in one semester of organ study. 

Music majors must participate in an ensemble for six semester hours. 
Music majors fulfill their particular ensemble requirement with 
participation in at least four of the required six semester hours of 
ensembles that use their particular applied study skills. 

General music studies majors with a principal applied area in 
percussion, brass, or woodwinds must satisfy their four semester hour 
ensemble requirement with at least one semester hour of Johnson City 
Community Concert Band (Civic Band). A maximum of two semester 
hours in jazz ensemble(if instrumentation appropriate) may count 
toward the ensemble credit. Students may choose any of the above 
ensembles for the fourth semester hour. 

For string majors, participation in Orchestra fulfills the ensemble 
requirement. Ensemble requirements for students whose principal 
applied area is guitar will be determined on an individual basis by the 
applied instructor and ensemble directors. Participation in choral or 
instrumental ensembles fulfills the ensemble requirement for students 
whose principal applied area is keyboard. 

For voice majors, participation in Milligan Women's Chorale or Concert 
Choir fulfills the ensemble requirement. 

Concert and recital attendance is required of the general music studies 
major for eight semesters (attending six concerts per semester). Failure 
to meet all recital attendance requirements results in a half a letter grade 
(5 points) reduction in every music class final average for the semester. 

Core 

MUSC 143 Basic Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
MUSC 144 Basic Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
MUSC 243 Advanced Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
MUSC 347 Form and Analysis (2 hrs) 
MUSC 363 Basic Conducting (3 hrs) 
MUSC 365 Music History Survey (3 hrs) 
Ensemble for 6 hours (.5 to 1.5 hrs per semester) 
Applied Music 

Principal area of concentration (4 hrs min./4 semesters) 
Secondary area of concentration (1 hr/2 semesters minimum 
OR until a piano proficiency [MUSC 207] is completed. 
Concert and recital attendance for 8 semesters (6 concerts per 
semester) 

Emphases 

Applied Study emphasis (10 hrs) 

MUSC 244 Advanced Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
MUSC 408 Senior Recital (1 hr) or 490 Senior Project (1 hr) 
MUSC 456 Applied Instrumental Pedagogy (2 hrs) 
Four additional semesters of principal area of concentration (4 hrs) 

Jazz Studies emphasis (10 hrs) 

MUSC 166 Survey of Jazz (3 hrs) 
MUSC 321 Jazz Improvisation (3 hrs) 
MUSC 421 Advanced Jazz Methods (3 hrs) 
MUSC 490 Senior Project (1 hr) 



Music Education - B.A. (37.5 hrs) 

The music education curriculum is designed as an interdisciplinary 
program for the student planning a career in teaching music. Students 
majoring in music education must choose either the instrumental or 
vocal emphasis. Licensure is K-12 vocal/general and instrumental. This 
degree requires nine semesters of study. Foreign language through the 
intermediate level is required. 

The student is trained in voice or an orchestral instrument, piano, 
conducting, and in the materials and methods of elementary and 
secondary music education. The student is also trained in educational 
applications of computer and digital keyboard technology. 
Opportunities for field work in area schools, including directed 
teaching, broaden the student's education. 

Applied music study for the music education major may be in voice, 
piano, organ, guitar, brass, woodwinds, strings, or percussion. Voice 
must be the principal or secondary concentration for those students 
with a major in music education with the vocal emphasis. An 
instrument other than piano must be the principal or secondary 
concentration for those students with a major in music education with 
the instrumental emphasis. Piano must be the principal or secondary 
concentration for the music education major unless a proficiency 
(MUSC 207) in piano is completed. All music education majors whose 
principal instrument is piano must enroll in one semester of organ 
study. 

Music majors must participate in an ensemble for six semester hours. 
Music majors fulfill their particular ensemble requirement with 
participation in an ensemble that uses their particular applied study skills 
for at least four of the required six semester hours. Ensemble 
participation cannot occur during Student Teaching: K-12 (EDUC 455). 

Music education-instrumental majors with a principal applied area in 
percussion, brass, or woodwinds must satisfy their four-semester hours 
of ensemble requirements with two semester hours of Johnson City 
Community Concert Band (Civic Band). A maximum of two semester 
hours in Jazz Ensemble (if instrumentation appropriate) may count 
toward the ensemble credit. Students may use any combination of these 
ensembles to satisfy this requirement, as long as they fulfill minimum 
and maximum requirements. 

For string majors, participation in Orchestra fulfills the ensemble 
requirement. Ensemble requirements for students whose principal 
applied area is guitar will be determined on an individual basis by the 
applied instructor and ensemble directors. Participation in choral or 
instrumental ensembles fulfills the ensemble requirement for students 
whose principal applied area is keyboard. 

For voice majors, participation in Concert Choir or Milligan Women's 
Chorale fulfills the ensemble requirement. 

Concert and recital attendance is required of the music education major 
for eight semesters (attending six concerts per semester), except during 
Student Teaching: K-12 (EDUC 455). Failure to meet all recital 
attendance requirements results in a half a letter grade (5 points) 
reduction in every music class final average for the semester. 

Music Education 

MUSC 143 Basic Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
MUSC 144 Basic Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
MUSC 243 Advanced Music/Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
MUSC 244 Advanced Music/Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
MUSC 348 Orchestration and Arranging (2 hrs) 
MUSC 363 Basic Conducting (3 hrs) 
MUSC 367 Music History and Literature I (3 hrs) 
MUSC 368 Music History and Literature II (3 hrs) 
Ensemble (6 hrs - .5 to 1.5 hrs per semester) 
Applied Music 

Principal area of concentration (7 hrs minimum/7 semesters) 



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116 music 



Secondary area of concentration (1.5 hrs/3 semesters 
minimum OR until a piano proficiency [MUSC 207] is 
completed) 
Concert and recital attendance (8 semesters [6 concerts/semester] 
except during Student Teaching: K-12 [EDUC 455]) 

Music education students planning to enter the Master of Education 
program after completing their undergraduate degree should consider 
taking the following courses for graduate credit (EDUC 533, EDUC 
535, EDUC 534, EDUC 536, and EDUC 537). 

MUSC 450/EDUC 533: Curriculum and Methods for Secondary 

Instrumental Music (or) 
MUSC 452/EDUC 535: Curriculum and Methods for Secondary 

Choral Music 
MUSC 451 /EDUC 534: Curriculum and Methods for Elementary 

Music 
MUSC 436/EDUC 536: Instrumental Methods I 
MUSC 437/EDUC 537: Instrumental Methods II 

These courses will count toward both the undergraduate degree 
(beyond the 128 hour requirement) and for the Master of Education 
degree at Milligan College. If the courses are taken for graduate credit, 
there will be graduate level objectives and assignments. 

These courses will replace the following required courses in the Master 
of Education degree program: 

EDUC 520 Mddle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and Methods 

(3hrs) 
EDUC 521 Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum II (3 hrs) 
Elective (3 hrs) 
Elective (3 hrs) 

Students seeking licensure in vocal music take only EDUC 534 and 535 
and two electives in their graduate program. Taking these courses would 
permit music education students to complete a Master of Education 
program in 1 2 months beyond their undergraduate program. For 
additional information, contact the Director of Teacher Certification or 
Area Chair for Education. 

For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the Catalog. 

Students seeking to complete a Master of Education program will 
complete the professional education courses below, except EDUC 455 
Student Teaching and EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar. Instead, they will 
complete an internship in the master's program. 

Professional education courses (19-20 hrs) 

EDUC 150 Introduction to Education (2 hrs) 

EDUC 152 Technology in Education (1 hi) oi MUSC 21 1 

Introduction to Music Technology (2 hrs) 
EDUC 231 Psychology and Education of Exceptional Students 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 455 Student Teaching: K-12 (12 hrs) OR 551 and 552 

Internship (1 1 hrs) 
EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar OR 560 Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 
PSYC 252 Developmental Psychology OR 253 Child 

Development or 254 Adolescent Development (3 hrs)* 

*Fulfills 3 hrs of social learning requirements in GER 



Teacher Licensure Requirements 

Instrumental emphasis (15 hrs) 

MUSC 364 Advanced Conducting (3 hrs) 
MUSC 436/EDUC 536 Instrumental Methods I (3 hrs) 
MUSC 437/EDUC 537 Instrumental Methods II (3 hrs) 
MUSC 450/EDUC 533 Curriculum/Methods for Secondary 

Instrumental Music (3 hrs) 
MUSC 451 /EDUC 534 Curriculum/Methods for Elementary Music 

(3 hrs) 

Vocal emphasis (11 hrs) 

MUSC 255 Introduction to Instrumental Techniques (2 hrs) 

MUSC 364 Advanced Conducting (3 hrs) 

MUSC 451 /EDUC 534 Curriculum and Methods for Elementary 

Music (3 hrs) 
MUSC 452/EDUC 535 Curriculum and Methods for Secondary 

Choral Music (3 hrs) 

See the Education: Licensure Programs section of this catalog for 
information about the PRAXIS II exams required for licensure. 



Fine Arts - B.A. (39 hrs) 

Music emphasis 

A student may declare a fine arts major with an emphasis in music. For 
further information on this major, refer to the information under the 
listing of Fine Arts. 



General Music Studies minor (19 hrs) 

MUSC 143 Basic Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 

MUSC 144 Basic Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 

MUSC 363 Basic Conducting (3 hrs) 

MUSC 365 Music History Survey (3 hrs) 

Ensemble for 4 hours (.5 to 1.5 hrs per ensemble per semester) 

Applied Music: 

Principal concentration for a minimum of 4 semesters (2 hrs) 
Secondary concentration for a minimum of 2 semesters (1 hr) 

Concert attendance for 4 semesters (4 concerts per semester) 



Music Ministry minor (21.5 hrs) 

The music ministry minor fits well with numerous majors. The study of 
music ministry may serve to foster students' avocational interests as well 
as prepare them for more concentrated music studies in the future. 

MUSC 143 Basic Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 

MUSC 144 Basic Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 

MUSC 363 Basic Conducting (3 hrs) 

MUSC 365 Music History Survey (3 hrs) 

MUSC 369 Planning and Leading Congregational Music (2 hrs) 

MUSC 491 Practicum in Music Ministry (1 hr) 

Ensemble for 4 hours (.5 to 1.5 hrs per ensemble per semester) 

Applied Music: 

Principal concentration for a minimum of 3 semesters 

(1.5 his) 

Secondary concentration for a minimum of 2 semesters (1 hr) 
Concert attendance for 4 semesters (attending 4 

concerts/semester) 

Either the principal or the secondary applied area for all music minors 
must be piano. 



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music 117 



Music minors with a principal area of concentration in percussion, 
brass, or woodwinds may satisfy two semester hours of the ensemble 
requirement with Jazz Ensemble (if instrumentation appropriate), and 
two semester hours in Johnson City Community Concert Band (Civic 
Band). For all voice minors, participation in Concert Choir or Milligan 
Women's Chorale fulfills the ensemble requirement. For string minors, 
participation in Orchestra fulfills the ensemble requirement. Ensemble 
requirements for students whose principal applied area is guitar will be 
determined on an individual basis by the applied instructor and 
ensemble directors. Participation in choral or instrumental ensembles 
fulfills the ensemble requirement for all students whose principal 
applied area is keyboard. 

Concert and recital attendance is required of all music minors for four 
semesters (attending four concerts per semester). Failure to meet all 
recital attendance requirements results in a half a letter grade (5 points) 
reduction in every music class final average for the semester. 



Course Descriptions 

MUSC 100. Applied Study- Voice - Individual instruction in singing. 
Open to all students. Offered ever}' term. One semester hour (one hour 
lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is voice. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson 
per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 101, 102, 201. Piano as a Secondary Concentration - Applied 
study for non-piano music majors and minors. Preparation toward 
attainment of proficiency for music majors. Two class meetings and one 
lab per week. Music 101 and 201 offered fall term each year; Music 102 
offered spring term each year. Two semester hours. 

MUSC 104. Applied Study-Piano - Individual instruction in piano. 
Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour 
lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is piano. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson 
per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 105. Applied Study-Organ - Individual instruction in organ. 
Open to all students. Offered ever)' term. One semester hour (one hour 
lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is organ. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson 
per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 106. Applied Study-Guitar - Individual instruction in guitar. 
Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour 
lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is guitar. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson 
per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 107. Applied Study-Flute - Individual instruction in flute. 
Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour 
lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is flute. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per 
week) for all other students. 

MUSC 109. Applied Study-Clarinet - Individual instruction in 
clarinet. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour 
(one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is clarinet. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson 
per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 110. Applied Study-Saxophone - Individual instruction in 
saxophone. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester 
hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area 
of concentration is saxophone. One-half semester hour (one-half hour 
lesson per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 111. Applied Study- Violin - Individual instruction in violin. 
Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour 
lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 



concentration is violin. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson 
per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 112. Applied Study- Viola - Individual instruction in viola. 
Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour 
lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is viola. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per 
week) for all other students. 

MUSC 113. Applied Study-Cello - Individual instruction in cello. 
Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour 
lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is cello. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per 
week) for all other students. 

MUSC 114. Applied Study-Percussion - Individual instruction in 
percussion. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester 
hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area 
of concentration is percussion. One-half semester hour (one-half hour 
lesson per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 115. Applied Study-Trumpet - Individual instruction in 
trumpet. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour 
(one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is trumpet. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson 
per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 116. Applied Study-Horn - Individual instruction in French 
horn. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one 
hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is French horn. One-half semester hour (one-half hour 
lesson per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 117. Applied Study-Trombone - Individual instruction in 
trombone. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester 
hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area 
of concentration is trombone. One-half semester hour (one-half hour 
lesson per week) for all other students. 

MUSC 118. Applied Study-Bass - Individual instruction in bass. Open 
to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson 
per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is 
bass. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all 
other students. 

MUSC 119. Applied Study-Tuba - Individual instruction in tuba. 
Open to all students. Offered even' term. One semester hour (one hour 
lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
concentration is tuba. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per 
week) for all other students. 

MUSC 124. Piano Class for Beginners - Group instruction for non- 
music majors and minors with no previous piano experience. The 
course teaches basic skills in piano playing, music reading, and theory. 
Students will learn to play various styles of piano music. Offered every 
term. Two semester hours. 

MUSC 130. Applied Accompanying - Individual instruction in the art 
and practice of accompanying for piano students. One semester hour 
(one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of 
instruction is piano. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per 
week) for all other students. 

MUSC 141. Basic Music Reading Skills - A studv of the basic 
fundamentals of music. Open to all students. Does not satisfy any 
requirements for the music major. Offered fall term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

MUSC 143-144. Basic Music Theory/Ear Training - A course in 
beginning written theory, including a laboratory' session for developing 
aural skills. MUSC 143 offered spring term each year; MUSC 144 



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118 music 



offered fall term each year. Three semester hours each semester. 

MUSC 163. Survey of Pop Music - The study and appreciation of 
American Popular music from 1900 to the present. Offered fall term 
even' year. Three semester hours. 

MUSC 166. Survey of Jazz - Origins, development, styles, composers, 
and major performers of the jazz movement, from the beginnings of 
jazz to the present day. Offered spring semester alternate years. Three 
semester hours. 

MUSC 181. Heritage - An auditioned a cappella ensemble of four to 
six singers-men and women-which represents the College in churches, 
at area civic organizations, and at college functions. This ensemble does 
not satisfy the ensemble requirement for music majors and minors. 
Offered every term. One-half semester hour. 

MUSC 182. Civic Band - Performance with the Johnson City 
Community Concert Band. One rehearsal per week. Offered every term. 
One-half semester hour. 

MUSC 183. Vocal Ensemble - A small vocal ensemble for use in 
specialized performances (ex. musicals, other theatre productions, etc.) 
or other areas of student and faculty expertise and interest. Offered as 
needed. One-half to one semester hour. 

MUSC 184. Concert Choir - An auditioned mixed chorus with a varied 
repertoire of classics, spirituals, hymn arrangements and musical theatre. 
The Choir tours annually and performs on numerous other occasions. 
Commitment is for both semesters. Offered every term. One and a half 
semester hours. 

MUSC 185. Pep Band - An instrumental ensemble devoted to 
performance of music during select Milligan College athletic events. 
Open to all students. Offered every term. One-half semester hour. 

MUSC 188. Instrumental Ensemble - A small ensemble for use in 
specialized performances (ex. musicals, other theatre productions, etc.) 
or other areas of student and faculty expertise and interest. Offered as 
needed. One-half to one semester hour. 

MUSC 189. Johnson City Symphony Orchestra - Performance with 
the Johnson City Symphony Orchestra. One rehearsal per week for two 
and one-half hours. Offered every term. One-half semester hour. 

MUSC 191. Jazz Ensemble - Organization is devoted to performance 
of jazz and pop styles, with emphasis on ensemble playing, solo playing, 
and improvisation. Open to all students by audition. Offered every 
term. One semester hour. 

MUSC 192. Orchestra - Orchestra rehearsing and performing 
representative literature. Open to all students by audition. Offered every 
term. One semester hour. 

MUSC 194. Brass Ensemble - An instrumental ensemble composed 
of brass instruments devoted to the study and performance of literature 
written specifically for brass. Offered ever)' term. One-half semester 
hour. 

MUSC 196. String Quartet - A chamber ensemble for string players 
which performs for on and off campus events. Open to all students by 
audition. Offered every term. One-half semester hour. 

MUSC 207. Piano Proficiency - A test of general accomplishment in 
the music major's secondary applied concentration. Achievement must 
be completed to fulfill secondary requirements. Offered every term. No 
credit. 

MUSC 211. Introduction to Music Technology - An introductory 
survey of the practical application of MIDI keyboards, computers, and 
interactive workstations as thev relate to music. The course includes 



hands-on exploration of MIDI keyboard instruments, computers, and 
related software. Offered fall term alternate years. Two semester hours. 

MUSC 243-244. Advanced Music Theory/Ear Training - A course 
in advanced written theory, including standard musical forms and 
contemporary music. A concurrent laboratory session develops and 
maintains aural skills. Prerequisite: MUSC 144 or permission of the 
instructor. MUSC 243 offered spring term each year; MUSC 244 
offered fall term each year. Three semester hours each semester. 

MUSC 250. World Music - An introduction to music styles of the 
world. Readings, discussion, listening to recorded examples, and 
exposure to performers and instruments of world cultures. Musical skill 
not required. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement 
in the general education core and can be counted toward a major in 
Humanities. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

MUSC 255. Introduction to Instrumental Techniques - 
Brass/Percussion/Woodwinds/Strings - The structure, use, 
techniques of playing, and care of the principal instruments in school 
instrumental organizations. Emphasis is on techniques necessary for 
basic understanding of the instruments. This course is for music 
education majors whose emphasis is vocal. Offered fall term alternate 
years. Two semester hours. 

MUSC 321. Jazz Improvisation - Theory and techniques of jazz 
improvisation with an emphasis on functional harmony, melodic form, 
special scales, tune studies, ear training, and development of style. 
Offered spring term every year. Three semester hours. 

MUSC 345. Composition - Techniques of musical composition in 
standard song forms, as well as instrumental solo and ensemble forms. 
Prerequisite: MUSC 144. Offered fall term alternate years. Two 
semester hours. 

MUSC 347. Form and Analysis - A study of major forms of music 
from the Baroque period through the Twentieth Century. Prerequisite: 
MUSC 243 or permission of the instructor. Offered fall term alternate 
years. Two semester hours. 

MUSC 348. Orchestration and Arranging - A course covering basic 
characteristics, arranging, and compositional techniques for orchestral 
instruments. Prerequisite: MUSC 244 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered spring term alternate years. Two semester hours. 

MUSC 363. Basic Conducting - A study of conducting techniques, 
elements of interpretation, and practice in sight-singing and rhythmic 
complexities. Prerequisite: MUSC 144. Offered fall term alternate years. 
Three semester hours. 

MUSC 364. Advanced Conducting - Advanced conducting 
techniques, including problems of tone, balance, and interpretation. 
Prerequisite: MUSC 363. Offered spring term alternate years. Three 
semester hours. 

MUSC 365. Music History Survey - Studies in techniques, forms, 
styles, and composers of the musical periods from the Renaissance to 
the present. Not open to music education majors. Offered spring term 
alternate years. Three semester hours. 

MUSC 367. Music History and Literature I - A survey of the 
development of Western music through Baroque, citing major 
composers and forms of each style period. Prerequisite: MUSC 144, or 
consent of the instructor. Offered fall term alternate years. Three 
semester hours. 

MUSC 368. Music History and Literature II - A survey of the 
development of Western Music from Classical to the present, citing 
major composers and forms of each style period. Prerequisite: MUSC 
367 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term alternate years. 



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music 119 



Three semester hours. 

MUSC 369. Planning and Leading Congregational Music - A 

survey of hymn, praise chorus, and scripture song literature of the 
church, with consideration for methods of selection and leadership of 
congregational musical worship. Offered spring term alternate years. 
Two semester hours. 

MUSC 390. Independent Study - An individualized course which 
enables the student to study material either not covered in the 
curriculum or not covered in a single course. The instructor determines 
the course of study. Offered as needed. One to three hours credit. 

MUSC 408. Senior Recital - One-hour performance. May be 
substituted with the Senior Project for the general music studies major 
with an emphasis in applied study. Offered ever)' term. One semester 
hour. 

MUSC 421. Advanced Jazz Methods - A study of advanced theory 
and techniques of jazz improvisation with additional emphasis on jazz 
styles and analysis, time studies, chord progressions, ear training, and 
jazz concepts. Enrollment must be approved by the instructor. Offered 
fall term odd years. Three semester hours. 

MUSC 436/EDUC 536. Instrumental Methods I - A study of brass 
and string instruments with emphasis on playing fundamentals, 
pedagogy, curriculum, and materials. For music education majors whose 
emphasis is instrumental. Offered fall term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

MUSC 437/EDUC 537. Instrumental Methods II - A study of 
woodwind and percussion instruments with emphasis on playing 
fundamentals, pedagogy, curriculum, and materials. Offered spring term 
each year. Three semester hours. 

MUSC 450/EDUC 533. Curriculum and Methods for Secondary 
Instrumental Music - A study of the philosophy, curriculum, methods, 
and materials of teaching instrumental music and directing bands and 
orchestras (grades 7-12). Prerequisite: MUSC 244. Offered spring term 
each year. Three semester hours. 



MUSC 451/EDUC 534. Curriculum and Methods for Elementary 
Music - A study of the philosophy, curriculum, methods, and materials 
of teaching music to children including studies of the child's musical 
development (grades PreK-6). Prerequisite: MUSC 244. Offered fall 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

MUSC 452/EDUC 535. Curriculum and Methods for Secondary 
Choral Music - A study of the philosophy, curriculum, methods, and 
materials of teaching vocal music and directing choral ensembles for 
students (grades 7-12). Prerequisite: MUSC 244. Offered spring term 
each year. Three semester hours. 

MUSC 454. Music Ministry Methods - A studv of the practical 
aspects of music ministry in the local church. Offered spring term 
alternate years. Three semester hours. 

MUSC 456. Applied Instrumental Pedagogy -A study of the 
philosophy, curriculum, methods, and materials of teaching applied 
instruments. Offered spring term odd years. Two semester hours. 

MUSC 490. Senior Project - An individualized course of study (thesis, 
lecture/demonstration, or other project) to be determined by the 
student and a faculty committee. Often interdisciplinary in nature, the 
project relates to the student's career interests. This course serves as the 
culminating project for the general music studies-jazz studies major. 
This course may serve as the culminating project for the general music 
studies-applied major. Offered every term. One to two semester hours. 

MUSC 491. Practicum in Music Ministry - Required of all music 
ministry minors. Supervised work in an approved church music 
program. Offered as needed. One semester hour. 

MUSC 495. Seminar - Seminars in specific areas of music for 
advanced students. Designed to promote in-depth discussion, 
independent research, writing, and performance in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Offered as needed. One to three semester 
hours. 



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120 nursing 



Nursing 

Area of Nursing 

The nursing major supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

The nursing science curriculum provides students with opportunities to 
develop, test, and use nursing knowledge, skills, and rationale in a 
variety of settings. Courses for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
degree prepare students for professional nursing career opportunities 
and for graduate studv. 

The graduate will be able to use critical thinking to: (1) Provide 
professional nursing care using a synthesis of knowledge derived from 
relevant life experiences; scientific, social, humane and Biblical learning; 
nursing theory and research; (2) Institute developmentallv appropriate 
independent and collaborative nursing interventions based on nursing 
assessment and identification of client needs and problems; (3) 
Communicate therapeutically with culturally diverse clients and client 
populations; (4) Initiate independent and collaborative nursing 
interventions with culturally diverse clients and client populations 
(individuals, families, groups, and communities) through the use of the 
nursing process; (5) Incorporate professional, legal, and ethical 
standards into own clinical practice based upon a Christian perspective; 
(6) Assume responsibility and accountability for personal development 
and ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of own clinical nursing 
practice; (7) Contribute to the enhancement of quality nursing and 
health care practices within a variety of settings; (8) Evaluate research 
findings for their relevance and application to professional practice; (9) 
Communicate clearly and effectively through a variety of mediums, 
fostering therapeutic interactions with patients and patient populations. 

Nursing studies build on the liberal arts and sciences tradition of 
Miliigan College. The following courses are required for nursing majors 
and fulfill designated components of the core curriculum: COMM 102, 
MATH 213, and PSYC 252. BIOL 250, 251, and 280 are required 
prerequisites for the nursing major. 



Nursing major - B.S.N. (62 hrs) 

NURS 202/202L Health Assessment (2 hrs) with Lab (1 hr) 
NURS 21 0/21 0C Fundamentals of Nursing (2 hrs) with Clinical 

(2 hrs) 
NURS 220/220C Fundamentals of Nursing II (2 hrs) with Clinical 

(2 hrs) 
NURS 300 Nursing Pharmacology (3 hrs) 
NURS 302 Primary Prevention and Health Promotion (2 hrs) 
NURS 310/310C Client System Stressors and Reactions (3 hrs) 

with Clinical (2 hrs) 
NURS 313/313C Nursing Interventions with Special Populations 

(Childbearing Family) (3 hrs) with Clinical (2 hrs) 
NURS 320/320C Complex Client System Stressors and Reactions 

(3 hrs) with Clinical (2 hrs) 
NURS 323/323C Nursing Interventions with Special Populations 

(Infants, Children, and Adolescents) (3 hrs) with Clinical 

(2 hrs) 
NURS 350 Introduction to Nursing Research (3 hrs) 
NURS 403/403C Nursing Interventions with Special Populations 



(Psych) (3 hrs) with Clinical (2 hrs) 
NURS 410/410C Critical Client Stressors and Reactions (3 hrs) 

with Clinical (2 hrs) 
NURS 420/420P Management of Patient Care Systems (3 hrs) 
with Nursing Management Preceptorship (2 hrs) 
NURS 422/422C Nursing in Community Health Systems (3 hrs) 

with Clinical (2 hrs) 
NURS 424 Professional Nursing Issues (2 hrs) 
NURS 460 Nursing Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 

Upon satisfactory completion of the nursing program requirements, 
graduates of the program become eligible to sit for the NCLEX-RN 
licensure examination. 

The area of nursing reserves the right to update and change the nursing 
curriculum at the beginning of any academic semester in conjunction 
with current professional nursing standards. All students seeking to 
pursue the curriculum plan leading toward a baccalaureate degree in 
nursing are required to follow a three-step process: initial acceptance, 
progression, and retention. Students who have been initially accepted 
are NOT guaranteed progression in the nursing major. Progression 
must be sought through an application process and is limited bv the 
availability of spaces in the class. 

Students who have been enrolled in nursing courses at other colleges or 
universities who wish to transfer to Milligan College must meet the 
same core curriculum requirements for progression. Transfer students 
will also be expected to demonstrate the same proficiency skills 
(N210/210C and N220/ 220C) and achieve the established passing 
standard on designated competency evaluations. Non-licensed, transfer 
students not enrolled in nursing coursework within the last five (5) years 
may not transfer nursing courses. 



Accreditation 

The Area of Nursing at Milligan College is accredited by the 
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), located at One 
DuPont Circle, NW Suite 530 Washington, DC 20036-1120. The 
CCNE phone number is 207-887-6791. 



RN/LPN Career Mobility Plan 

RNs and LPNs seeking to meet degree requirements will follow the 
articulation plan outlined below. These students may receive credits that 
will be considered equivalent to specific required nursing courses. LPNs 
are required to enroll in N201/201C and N202/202L as their pre- 
nursing requirements. RNs are required to enroll in N202/202L. Both 
RNs and LPNs are expected to seek progression into the major upon 
completion of the required core and pre-nursing requirements. 



RN Career Mobility Plan 

Registered nurses articulating to the baccalaureate degree level in 
nursing may be awarded or may transfer nursing credits to Milligan 
College equivalent to approximately one year of nursing courses in this 
program. Only a grade of C or better in previous nursing courses is 
eligible for consideration in this option. 

Required core curriculum course credits are transferred and awarded 
according to pre-established policies of Milligan College. All degree 
candidates are expected to meet the core curriculum requirements in 
addition to the nursing program requirements. Students are expected to 
complete the arts and sciences core curriculum requirements, Nursing 
202/202L, and to have been progressed into the nursing major prior to 
enrolling in any 300 level nursing course. 

Nursing credits that are awarded or transferred under this articulation 
model are placed on individual transcripts by Milligan College only after 



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nursing 121 



the student has successfully completed Nursing 301/301C at Milligan 
College. All students enrolling in the B.S.N, program under the career 
mobility plan are expected to complete a minimum of 45 semester 
hours at Milligan College. 

Advanced placement testing is required for graduates of non-NLNAC 
or CCNE accredited programs and for students who have not been in 
active clinical practice in the past three years. Students who seek to meet 
degree requirements through advanced placement testing must 
successfully complete all of the designated standardized challenge exams 
according to established passing standards in order to receive course 
credits. Test results will be considered valid for a three-year period. 
Students may repeat a given test once. If the student is not successful in 
passing the test on the second attempt, the student will be required to 
enroll in the course(s) of comparable content at Milligan College. 



LPN Mobility Plan 



LPNs articulating to the baccalaureate degree level in nursing may be 
awarded transfer credits to Milligan equivalent to the fundamentals of 
nursing courses (NURS 210, 21 0C, 220, and 220C). Only courses in 
which a grade of C or better was earned in the LPN program are eligible 
for consideration in this option. 

Required core curriculum course credits may be transferred and 
awarded according to pre-established policies of Milligan College. All 
students enrolling in the B.S.N, program under the career mobility plan 
are expected to complete a minimum of 45 semester hours at Milligan 
College. 

Nursing credits that are awarded or transferred under this articulation 
model will be placed on individual transcripts by Milligan only after the 
student has successfully completed Nursing 201/201C and 202/202L at 
Milligan 



NURS 202. Health Assessment - An exploration of the knowledge, 
observational, interactional, and psychomotor skills required for 
assessing the health status and needs of clients of all ages. Pre/ Co- 
requisites: BIOL 250, 251; NURS 210/ 21 0C or equivalents; or current 
RN licensure and permission of faculty. Co-requisite: NURS 202L. 
Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours; two clock hours. 

NURS 202L. Health Assessment Lab - Opportunities to practice the 
assessment modalities of inspection, palpation, percussion, and 
auscultation are provided. Students are expected to conduct regional 
and comprehensive physical examinations within the campus lab 
setting. Co-requisite: NURS 202. Offered spring term each year. One 
semester hour; three clock hours. 

NURS 210. Fundamentals of Nursing - An introduction to the 
fundamental concepts of holistic nursing and the nursing process. This 
process is presented as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool for 
identifying client problems and for initiating independent and 
collaborative nursing interventions. Pre/Co-requisite: BIOL 250 and 
380. Co-requisite: NURS 21 OC. Offered fall term each year. Two 
semester hours; two clock hours. 

NURS 210C. Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical - A focus on the 
development of fundamental competencies required for instituting 
independent and collaborative nursing interventions. Opportunities to 
test and use the nursing process as a critical thinking and problem- 
solving tool are provided. Co-requisite: NURS 210. Offered fall term 
each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours. 

NURS 220. Fundamentals of Nursing II - A continuation of NURS 
210, the study of the fundamental concepts of holistic nursing and the 
nursing process. Prerequisites: NURS 210/210C. Pre/Co-requisite: 
BIOL 251 or equivalent. Co-requisites: NURS 220C and 202/202L. 
Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours; two clock hours. 



Course Descriptions 



NURS 191. Exploration of Professional Nursing — A course open to 
all students considering entry into the nursing profession. Supervised 
preceptorship in clinical agencies allows the student to understand 
better the various roles of the professional registered nurse. Offered 
every term, including summers. One to four semester hours. 

NURS 198. Medical Terminology - A course open to all students 
considering entry into health care related professions. This course is 
designed to assist students to identify and define the root words, 
suffixes, prefixes, and combining forms commonly found in medical 
terminology. Student learning activities and exercises are utilized to 
assist students to remember significant concepts and to understand the 
meaning of new words by defining the elements contained within them. 
Offered every semester. One semester hour; one clock hour. 

NURS 201. LPN Transition Course - An overview of the concepts of 
holistic professional nursing and the nursing process. This process is 
presented as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool for identifying 
client problems and for initiating independent and collaborative nursing 
interventions. Prerequisites: Current LPN/LVN licensure with current 
practice. Pre/Co-requisites: BIOL 250, 251, and 380 or equivalents. Co- 
requisites: 201 C and 202/202L. Offered spring term each year 
(dependent on student need). Two semester hours; two clock hours. 

NURS 201C. LPN Transition Course: Clinical - Opportunities to 
use the nursing process as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool 
for identifying and initiating independent and collaborative nursing 
interventions within this clinical component. Previously learned 
technical nursing arts and skills are validated. Co-requisite: NURS 201. 
Offered spring term each vear (dependent on student need). Two 
semester hours; six clock hours. 



NURS 220C. Fundamentals of Nursing II Clinical - A continuation 
of NURS 21 0C with the focus on providing students opportunities to 
test and use the nursing process as a critical thinking and problem 
solving tool to provide holistic nursing care. Opportunities to develop 
additional competencies in selected beginning nursing interventions are 
also provided within the clinical practice setting. Co-requisite: NURS 220. 
Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours; six dock hours. 

NURS 291. Clinical Exploration in Nursing - A supervised 
preceptorship in various agencies allowing the student additional clinical 
practice with a patient population of interest. Prerequisites: NURS 
210/210C. Offered spring and summer terms each year. One to four 
semester hours. 

Progression to junior (300) level courses in the nursing 
major must be sought through the application process. 
Students may only enroll in 300 level courses upon 
acceptance into the nursing major through this process. 

NURS 300. Nursing Pharmacology - An introduction to 
pharmacology and die pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic 
processes relevant to clinical nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the 
studv of prototypical drugs, their effects on human beings, and the 
implications for nursing practice. Pre/Co-requisites: NURS 31 0/31 0C. 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 301. RN Transition Course - An overview of the theories and 
concepts of holistic, professional nursing. The nursing process is 
discussed as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool for identifying 
client problems and for initiating independent and collaborative nursing 
interventions. Prerequisites: Current RN licensure, progression into the 
nursing major; and NURS 202/202L. Co-requisite: NURS 301 C. 
Offered fall term each vear (dependent on student need). Three 
semester hours; three clock hours. 



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122 nursing 



NURS 301C. RN Transition Course: Clinical - Opportunities to 
utilize and test the nursing process in identifying and initiating 
independent and collaborative nursing interventions within simulated 
and clinical practice setting. Previously learned technical nursing arts 
and skills are validated. Co-requisite: NURS 301. Offered fall term each 
year (dependent on student need). Two semester hours; six clock hours. 

NURS 302. Health Promotion and Illness Prevention - An 

introduction to health promotion and illness prevention. Course 
content addresses the role of the nurse and the nursing process in 
developing partnerships with individuals, families, and groups to 
provide independent and collaborative interventions for health 
promotion and disease prevention. Areas of focus include: therapeutic 
client/ nurse relationships; concepts of client education; specific disease 
prevention modalities; and holistic health promotion activities. Offered 
fall term each year. Two semester hours; two clock hours. 



intervention modalities with pediatric clients experiencing actual or 
potential health problems. Co-requisite: NURS 323. Offered spring 
term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours. 

NURS 340. End of Life/Palliative Care - A focus on the critical 
aspects of end of life care including palliative care; pain management; 
symptom control; ethical/legal issues; cultural considerations; 
communication; grief, loss, and bereavement; preparation and care for the 
time of death; and achieving quality care at the end of life. Identified 
themes of the course curriculum include: the family as the unit of care; 
role of the caregiver as advocate; importance of culture as an influence at 
the end of life; critical needs of special populations such as children, the 
elderly, the poor, and the uninsured; critical financial issues in the end of 
life care; palliative care across all life threatening illness and in sudden 
death; and the interdisciplinary approach for quality care at the end of life. 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 



NURS 310. Adult Medical/Surgical Nursing I - A presentation of 
adult medical/surgical problems that interfere with client health status. 
Through the use of the nursing process, complex intervention 
modalities are discussed. Pre/Co-requisites: NURS 300 and 310C. 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 310C. Adult Medical/ Surgical Nursing I Clinical - A 

practicum experience providing opportunities within a variety of clinical 
settings to utilize the nursing process to implement complex 
intervention modalities with clients experiencing actual or potential 
medical/surgical health problems. Co-requisite: NURS 310. Offered fall 
term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours. 

NURS 313. Maternal/Child Nursing - A focus on the pregnant 
woman, neonate, and family and the commonly experienced problems 
of this population during the childbearing process. Nursing 
interventions specific to these problems are presented. Pre/Co- 
requisites: NURS 300 and 310/310C. Co-requisite: NURS 31 3C. 
Offered fall term each vear. Three semester hours; three clock hours. 



NURS 350. Introduction to Nursing Research - A focus on 
developing an understanding and use of nursing research as a basis for 
professional nursing practice. Students are introduced to the steps of 
the research process and critique. Pre/Co-requisite: MATH 213. 
Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 390. Independent Study - Special topics and/ or experiences 
not addressed within the curriculum and non-substitutable for required 
courses in the major but of special interest to the student. Course work 
is accomplished independendy under a pre-approved contract with a 
designated faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental approval for the 
proposal. To be arranged. One to three semester hours; one to three 
clock hours. 

NURS 391. Clinical Exploration in Nursing- Supervised 
preceptorship in various agencies allowing the student additional clinical 
practice with a patient population of interest Open to students eligible 
to enroll in NURS 300 level courses. Offered every term, including 
summer. One to four semester hours. 



NURS 313C. Maternal/Child Nursing Clinical - A practicum 
experience providing opportunities within a variety of healthcare and 
community settings to utilize the nursing process to implement complex 
intervention modalities with clients experiencing actual or potential 
health problems associated with the childbearing process. Co-requisite: 
NURS 313. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours; six clock 
hours. 

NURS 320. Adult Medical/ Surgical Nursing II - A continuing 
presentation of problems that interfere with client health status. 
Through the use of the nursing process, complex intervention 
modalities are discussed. Prerequisites: Nursing 300, 310/310C. Co- 
requisite: NURS 320C. Offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 320C. Adult Medical/Surgical Nursing II Clinical - A 

practicum experience providing continuing opportunities within a 
variety of clinical settings to utilize the nursing process to implement 
complex intervention modalities with clients experiencing actual or 
potential medical/ surgical health problems. Co-requisite: NURS 320. 
Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours. 



All required nursing 300 level courses must be completed 
before a student may advance to nursing 400 level 
courses. Exceptions to this policy are nursing electives 
that may be taken with instructor permission in unusual 
individual circumstances. 

NURS 403. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing - A focus on the 
psychotherapeutic management associated with mental health, mental 
illness, and chemical substance abuse, including pharmacology, 
therapeutic nurse client communication, and environmental 
considerations. Through the use of the nursing process, complex 
intervention modalities are discussed. Co-requisite: NURS 403C. 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 403C. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Clinical - A 

practicum experience in a variety of in-patient and community-based 
settings designed to provide students with opportunities to promote 
mental health and provide independent and collaborative nursing 
interventions for clients diagnosed with mental illness. Co-requisite: 
NURS 403. Offered fall term each vear. Two semester hours; six clock 
hours. 



NURS 323. Pediatric Nursing - A focus on the developmental, 
potential, and commonlv experienced physiological and psychosocial 
problems of infants, children, adolescents, and their families. Through 
the use of the nursing process, complex intervention modalities specific 
to the pediatric client population are presented. Prerequisites: NURS 
313/313C. Co-requisite: 323C. Offered spring term each year. Three 
semester hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 323C. Pediatric Nursing Clinical - A practicum experience 
providing opportunities within a variety of healthcare and community 
settings to utilize the nursing process to implement complex 



NURS 410. Critical Client Nursing - The study of actions and 
reactions that place a client in a potential or actual life-threatening state. 
Using the nursing process format, critical care interventions are 
discussed. Co-requisite: NURS 410C. Offered fall term each year. Three 
semester hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 410C. Critical Client Nursing Clinical - A clinical practicum 
experience providing opportunities, within a high-tech setting, to utilize 
the nursing process to implement critical care intervention modalities 
with clients experiencing potential or actual life-threatening states. Co- 
requisite: NURS 410. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours; 



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nursing 123 



six clock hours. 

NURS 420. Nursing Leadership and Management - An 

examination of care within a rapidly changing health care delivery 
system. Leadership skills and management strategies necessary for 
appropriate and effective holistic nursing care are explored and 
analyzed. The use of outcome measures to promote quality and cost 
effective health care in various organizations and health care delivery 
systems is emphasized. Prerequisites: NURS 41 0/41 0C or equivalents. 
Co-requisite: NURS 420P. Offered spring term each year. Three 
semester hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 420P. Nursing Leadership and Management Preceptorship 

- An intensive clinical practicum experience focusing on the application 
of the nursing management process for organizing and facilitating the 
delivery of comprehensive, holistic, efficient, and effective nursing care 
to groups of clients in a variety of settings. Students are expected to 
demonstrate competencies of professional accountability and 
responsibility within established standards and guidelines. Co-requisite: 
NURS 420. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours; fifteen 
clock hours. 

NURS 422. Nursing in Community Health Systems - A focus on 
the concepts and skills required by nurses to promote and preserve the 
health of populations within existing public health infrastructures and in 
developing community partnerships. Emphasis is placed on 
independent and collaborative nursing interventions used to meet the 
health care needs of a variety of aggregate and "at risk" community 
populations. Prerequisites: NURS 403/403C and 410/410C, or 
equivalents. Co-requisite: NURS 422C. Offered spring term each year. 
Three semester hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 422C. Nursing in Community Health Systems Clinical - A 

clinical practicum experience that provides students opportunities to 
practice the role of the community health nurse within the current 
public health care delivery system. Students are also assigned to work 
with a variety of at risk aggregate population groups within the 
community in order to assess their health needs, and design and 
implement appropriate independent and collaborative nursing 
interventions. Co-requisite: NURS 422. Offered spring term each year. 
Two semester hours; six clock hours. 



NURS 460. Nursing Capstone Seminar - A seminar course designed 
to promote review, reflection, and integration of all nursing curriculum 
content. The course includes completion of the application process, in- 
depth review, and preparation for the NCLEX-RN examination. 
Enrollment limited to students in their last semester of nursing 
curriculum. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour. 

NURS 480. Parish Nursing - An elective course that provides 
students an opportunity to assist and function in a parish nursing role, 
providing health promotion opportunities which seek to unite the 
physical and spiritual aspects of wellness for the members of a selected 
church congregation. The course includes a service-learning component 
in select churches within the community. Prerequisites: NURS 
320/320C or equivalents. Offered fall or spring term; dependent on 
student demand. Three credit hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 482. Complex Stressors of the Childbearing Family - An 

elective course that provides a focus on the complex, critical, and 
potentially life-threatening stressors that may be experienced by the 
childbearing woman, neonate, and family. Through the use of the 
nursing process, complex interventions are discussed and current 
research findings presented. Students are challenged to utilize critical 
thinking skills to explore alternative nursing interventions to traditional 
care provided to this client population. Pre/Co-requisites: NURS 
41 0/41 0C. Offered fall term each year (dependent on enrollment). 
Three semester hours; three clock hours. 

NURS 490. Independent Study - Special topics and/or experiences 
not addressed within the curriculum and non-substitutable for required 
courses in the major but of special interest to the student. Course work 
is to be accomplished independently under a pre-approved contract 
with a designated faculty member. Prerequisites: Department approval 
of proposal. Option available each term. One to three semester hours; 
one to three clock hours. 

NURS 491. Clinical Exploration in Nursing - Supervised 
preceptorship in various agencies allowing the student additional clinical 
practice with a patient population of interest. Prerequisite: NURS 
21 0/21 0C. Offered spring and summer terms. One to four semester 
hours. 



NURS 424. Professional Nursing Issues - A senior forum that 
focuses on issues and trends which influence health care delivery, 
contemporary nursing, and its practitioners. Economic, social, cultural, 
legal, ethical, and political issues are discussed in relation to a Christian 
worldview and professional nursing standards. Prerequisites: NURS 
41 0/41 0C and 403/403C or equivalents. Co-requisites: NURS 
420/420P. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours; two 
clock hours. 



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124 occupational therapy (MSOT) 



Master of Science in 
Occupational Therapy 
(M.S.O.T.) 

Occupational Therapy is a health and rehabilitation profession that 
helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It 
gives people the "skills for the job of living" necessary for independent 
and satisfying lives (American Occupational Therapy Association, 
2004). 

The Master of Science in Occupational Therapy degree program 
supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate social responsibility in numerous ways, 
such as serving in churches, on the mission field (domestic and 
foreign), and with social agencies; mentoring, nurturing, and 
protecting others; and displaying increased understanding of and 
experience with other cultures. 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
libera] arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

The Master of Science in Occupational Therapy degree program 
promotes integration and utilization of theory and practice in the art 
and science of occupational therapy and prepares students to meet the 
entry-level standards of the American Occupational Therapy 
Association. 

The Master of Science in Occupational Therapy degree program is 
designed for students who have an earned bachelor's degree and who 
have completed the prerequisite requirements for admission to the 
program. Baccalaureate degrees can be in a variety of academic areas, 
some of which include human performance and exercise science, 
human development, sociology, biology, and psychology. 



therapy or an occupational therapy-related position. 



Goals 

The following goals are expected upon completion of the professional 
curriculum and arise directly from the missions of the College and the 
professional program and from the program's philosophy. By the time 
of graduation from this curriculum, the student should: (1) Demonstrate 
professional-level competencies necessary for practice as an 
occupational therapist in health care and human service delivery 
systems; (2) Apply accepted principles of scientific inquiry to the study 
of problems in health and human service delivery; (3) Demonstrate the 
management skills necessary for the sendee delivery of occupational 
therapy; (4) Demonstrate professional and caring attitudes and values 
consistent with the practice of occupational therapy; (5) Assume a 
leadership role in advancing the field of occupational therapy. 



Financial Information 

Tuition is S490 per semester hour for the 2006-2007 school year. A 
non-refundable application fee of $30 is required with the application. 
For information regarding financial aid, please refer to the financial aid 
section of the catalog. 



Library 



The P.H. Welshimer Library supports the program by providing access 
to over 600 scholarly journals including the leading journals in 
occupational therapy. Numerous electronic databases (Psychology 
Abstracts, Sociology Abstracts, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and 
Allied Health Literature) are also available. In addition to the Welshimer 
Library, students and faculty have access to the Occupational Therapy 
Program Professional Resource Center, and the libraries of Emmanuel 
School of Religion, East Tennessee State University (main campus and 
medical school), and the Holston Associated Libraries, Inc. (HAL). 

HAL consists of Milligan and seven additional libraries in the region. 
The computer system displays in each library the holdings of all eight 
libraries in a shared catalog. Due dates are shown for materials that are 
checked out of each library. Materials are readily lent among the 
libraries. Many additional features of the system enhance information 
exchange and resource sharing. Through these agreements, Milligan 
students have access to many materials beyond the considerable 
holdings of the Welshimer Library. Further, membership in the 
Southeastern Library Network provides interlibrary loan access to the 
holdings of thousands of additional libraries worldwide. 



Accreditation 

The occupational therapy program at Milligan College is accredited by 
the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education 
(ACOTE), a division of The American Occupational Therapy 
Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 
31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. Their phone number is 301-652- 
AOTA. Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the national 
certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by 
the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy 
(NBCOT). Beginning January 1, 2007, occupational therapy educational 
programs will only be accredited at the post baccalaureate degree level. 

After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an 
Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). In addition, most states 
require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually 
based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. 
(Applicants should note that previous conviction of a felony may affect a 
graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain 
licensure.) One hundred percent of graduates from Milligan College's 
M.S.O.T. program have found employment in the field of occupational 



Professional Resource Center 

The Professional Resource Center (PRC) houses an extensive 
collection of assessment instruments, videotapes, DVDs, and 
intervention equipment. A computer cluster and workspace where 
students can explore Internet resources, perform data analysis for 
research projects, and produce multimedia presentations are part of the 
PRC. The PRC is available to therapists in the community as well as the 
students of the program. 



Admission Requirements 

The minimum requirements for admission to the M.S.O.T. program are 
as follows: 

1 . An undergraduate degree with overall undergraduate grade 
point average of 3.0 

2. Volunteer experience in a variety of occupational therapy 
clinical settings with a minimum of 40 documented hours or 



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occupational therapy (MSOT) 125 



b. 



c. 

d. 



a disability related work/ volunteer experience with the proper 
documentation 

3. Combined GRE scores of at least 1000 (verbal + 
quantitative) 

4. TOEFL score of at least 550 (international students) 

5. Two completed reference forms from persons who have 
adequate knowledge of the applicant's Christian commitment, 
character, and professional qualities of potential for success 
as a graduate student 

6. A completed baccalaureate degree that includes the following 
prerequisite courses: 

a. Math and Science (9-12 hrs; 4 hrs of which must 
be a combined anatomy and physiology course) 
Social Science to include Introduction to 
Psychology and either Introduction to Sociology or 
Introduction to Anthropology (9 hrs) 
Communication (Written and Verbal) (6 hrs) 
Medical Terminology (1-3 hrs) 

e. Computer Literacy (3 hrs) (can be fulfilled through 
documented computer competency) 

(Substitution or waiver of requirement for any of the above prerequisite 
courses may be granted by the occupational therapy program 
admissions committee on an individual basis.) 

Prospective students meeting the minimum admission criteria will be 
invited to a brief individual interview and completion of a writing 
sample. Final selection of students will be made by the admissions 
committee of the occupational therapy program and will be based on 
weighted scores obtained from the grade point average and the required 
admission visit. Matriculation of a cohort of new students is contingent 
upon an adequate number of admitted applicants. 

Provisional Standing 

Students may be admitted to the occupational therapy program with 
one or more of the prerequisite requirements not met. Admission is 
made on an individual basis by the occupational therapy admissions 
committee and is based, in part, on the student's potential for success in 
the program. 

Provisional status is designated for a maximum of two semesters. 
Students who do not meet the objectives set forth in their provisional 
standing will be placed on probationary status and given one semester 
for resolution of the provisional objectives. 

Students who have been provisionally admitted due to low GPA (GPA 
below 3.0) must achieve a 3.0 or better cumulative GPA during the first 
two semesters in the program. Provisional students who achieve this 
level of performance will be awarded full standing in the program. 

Students who have been provisionally admitted due to course deficiency 
must successfully complete (3.0 or better grade for each course) those 
courses by the end of the second semester of the program. Students are 
strongly encouraged to complete all prerequisite course work prior to 
starting the academic program. Admittance to the program due to 
incomplete prerequisite courses is not guaranteed and is considered to 
be an exception to accepted program policy. 



Academic Probation and 
Retention Standards 

Retention in the occupational therapy program is based on a 
combination of academic performance and adherence to the program's 
Technical Standards for Admission and Retention and/or the 
Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics for Students (see Occupational 



Therapy Student Manual for a detailed overview of the Technical 
Standards and statement of Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics for 
students). Specific standards include but are not limited to the 
following: 

1 . The student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 
"B" (3.0) to graduate from the occupational therapy program. 

2. The student must earn a grade of at least "C" in non-core 
courses within the program. 

3. The student must earn a grade of at least "B" in all core (theory 
and practice courses) courses. 

4. Failure to comply with the above standards will necessitate 

program faculty action that includes, but is not limited to: 
repetition of specific courses, fulfillment of additional 
requirements, academic probation, and/or dismissal from the 
program. 



Transfer Credit 

Transfer credit is generally not permitted because of the program 
accreditation requirements. Special circumstances may warrant 
permission of transfer credit. The program faculty council and 
admissions committee will make determination of transfer credit. 



Time Limits for Completion 
Requirements 

All students are admitted to the occupational therapy program on a full- 
time basis. Completion of all degree requirements on a full-time basis 
will take a minimum of two and one-half years. In exceptional cases, 
part-time status may be granted. Part-time students must complete all 
degree requirements within a period defined bv the faculty council of 
the occupational therapy program. This time period must not exceed six 
years. Students must complete their clinical affiliations within 24 
months of completing their classroom work. 



Grade Requirements for Graduation 

Students must achieve a 3.0 average for graduation. 

Curriculum and Course Sequence 

The 80-hour curriculum includes coursework in three essential 
components: basic skills, the occupational therapy process, and 
capstone experiences. 

Component I: Basic Skills 

The basic skills component represents subject matter which serves as 
the foundation for the professional theories and practice methods. This 
component includes applied science courses, research methods and 
design, and an introduction to the profession of occupational therapy. 

Component II: The Occupational Therapy Process 

The core of this curriculum, the occupational therapy process, includes 
the study of occupation, typical life span development, and wellness 
with integration of the major theories and practice methods of 
occupational therapy. A developmental sequence is utilized to facilitate 
continuity and consistency from one course to another. Major topics 
dealing with disease processes, the physical and psychosocial impact of 
dysfunction, wellness, assessment, intervention, and adaptation are 
incorporated. This sequence of courses promotes the development of 
critical thinking skills. An introduction to clinical experiences through 
Level I Fieldwork is included. 



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126 occupational therapy (MSOT) 



Component III: Capstone Experiences 

The capstone component of the curriculum is designed to move the 
student further toward the objective of integrated critical thinking. 
Topics covered in these courses include: administration and leadership, 
advanced clinical reasoning, directed research, and Level II Fieldwork. 
At the end of this component of the curriculum, the student should be 
prepared to sit for the NBCOT certification examination for the 
occupational therapist. 

In addition, the student is expected to complete either an original 
research project or an individual master's thesis. 

The courses and the clinical experiences are designed to develop the 
knowledge and skills of the highest national standards. The teaching 
faculties are dedicated professionals prepared to offer applied science 
and skills courses at the advanced level. 



OT 580. Research Design and Methods in Occupational Therapy 

I - An introduction to research design with emphasis on occupational 
therapy Literature and skill development in review of research literature, 
formulation of problem statements, research design, and critical analysis 
of published research. Research methodology is reviewed with emphasis 
on recognizing and dealing with threats to methodological validity and 
reliability. Students identify research interests with occupational therapy 
applications or focus. Offered fall term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

OT 605. Lifespan Occupational Development I - The study of 
normal occupational development of infants through adolescence with 
emphasis upon the functional roles typical for children within a variety 
of cultural settings, i.e. self-care, play, school, family, and friend 
relationships. Activities and tasks reflective of role functioning are 
analyzed. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours. 



Course Descriptions 

OT 501. Diagnostic Considerations for Occupational Therapy - A 

review of major pathophysiological and psychosocial conditions 
including clinical descriptions, etiology, routine diagnostic procedures, 
progression of the condition, medical management, prognosis and 
outcomes. From an occupational performance perspective, information 
is presented in terms of how the condition might affect and influence 
sensorimotor, cognitive, psychosocial, self-care, productivity, and leisure 
functioning. A clinical team approach and legal issues of mental health 
are presented. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours. 

OT 510. Christ and Calling in Health Care - A seminar class 
designed to help students integrate their faith into health service 
provision and administration. Issues addressed include exploration of 
Christ as a healer, exploration of self and one's calling, scientific study 
of the impact of religion on health care, appropriate avenues of ministry 
in health care, and how to surmount obstacles to compassion in 
American health care culture. Offered fall term each year. One semester 
hour. 

OT 531. Musculoskeletal Anatomy - A regional study of human 
muscular and skeletal anatomy with particular emphasis on the back and 
upper extremity. Course includes cadaver dissection, demonstration, 
and lecture. This course is available to undergraduate students with 
senior status. Undergraduate prerequisites: senior status, BIOL 250 or 
330, and consent of instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

OT 532. Functional Neuroanatomy - A presentation of human 
neuroanatomy with implications for abnormality and subsequent 
therapy treatment. The course includes the study of human nervous 
system specimens in a laboratory setting. This course is available to 
undergraduate students with senior status. Undergraduate prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. This course may be taken by undergraduate 
students to fulfill one four-hour laboratory science requirement in the 
GER. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

OT 535. Kinesiology - Human Movement - A study of the principles 
of human movement including analysis of biomechanics, joint structure 
and function, muscle physiology, and musculoskeletal function. An 
introduction is given to methods to improve movement quality in 
functional performance. Offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

OT 560. Fundamentals of Occupational Therapy - A foundation 
(history, organization, personnel, and their respective roles) for the 
development of the clinical aspects of occupational therapy practice. 
Emphasis is on the philosophy of using activity analysis as a foundation 
for clinical reasoning. Teaching theory and learning styles are included. 
Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours. 



OT 606. Lifespan Occupational Development II - The study of 
normal occupational development of young adulthood through older 
adulthood with emphasis upon the functional roles typical for adults 
within a variety of cultural settings, i.e., self-care, care of others, work, 
leisure, family, and community interactions. Activities and tasks 
reflective of role functioning are analyzed. Offered spring term each 
year. Two semester hours. 

OT 607. Professional Writing in Occupational Therapy - 

Instruction in and practice of professional documentation, 
documentation for reimbursement, grant-proposal writing, and letter- 
writing skills necessary in the practice of occupational therapy. Offered 
spring term each year. One semester hour. 

OT 610. Play/Leisure - The exploration of play/leisure as a primary 
performance area of occupational therapy. Laboratory experience in 
play/leisure skills evaluation and training for the physically, mentally, 
and cognitively disabled. This course emphasizes evaluation and training 
with a life-span perspective. Strategies that promote adaptation to 
disabilities and that increase role independence include: using 
play/leisure activities in therapeutic intervention, adapting media and 
play/leisure tasks to specific disabling conditions. Offered fall term each 
year. Two semester hours. 

OT 615. Work Programs in Occupational Therapy: Principles and 
Practice - Major vocational theories will be explored. The assessment 
and intervention of work dysfunction related to physical, cognitive, and 
mental impairments are addressed. Assessment and intervention skills 
include: prevocational, job analysis, work/ functional capacity, and 
ergonomics. Legal issues related to the Americans with Disabilities Act, 
Individual with Disabilities Education Act, workers' compensation, and 
Social Security Disability are included. Opportunities for occupational 
therapists to serve as consultants to various industries are explored. 
Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours. 

OT 620. Activities of Daily Living - Laboratory experience in the 
evaluation, intervention, and training of basic and instrumental activities 
of daily living for the physically, mentally, and cognitively disabled. This 
course focuses on a range of implementation strategies including 
environmental adaptation, use and design of adaptive equipment, 
restructuring cognitive complexity, and training caregivers to assist 
individuals in regaining functional independence in meaningful 
activities. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours. 

OT 631. Psychosocial Theory and Practice - The study and 
application of psychosocial components of occupational therapy 
practice in all areas of practice with a focus on mental health diagnoses 
and an emphasis on the development of the therapeutic relationship. 
Psychosocial theories and occupational theories such as the Model of 
Human Occupation along with related intervention strategies are 
addressed through coursework and community service learning 
experiences. Offered fall term each year. Five semester hours. 



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occupational therapy (MSOT) 127 



OT 632. Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics - A developmental 
approach to principles of occupational therapy with infants and 
children, including evaluation, treatment planning, treatment techniques, 
discharge planning, and working with care givers. Offered spring term 
each year. Five semester hours. 

OT 643. Orthopedic Dysfunction Theory and Practice - A holistic 
approach to the theory and practice of occupational therapy with adults, 
including evaluation, intervention planning, intervention techniques, 
and discontinuation of services. Interaction with caregivers and team 
members will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on general 
orthopedic conditions, upper extremity dysfunction, and splinting skills. 
Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours. 

OT 644. Neurological Dysfunction Theory and Practice - A holistic 
approach to the theory and practice of occupational therapy with adults, 
including evaluation, intervention planning, intervention techniques, 
and discontinuation of services. Interaction with caregivers and team 
members will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on neurological 
conditions. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

OT 651. Group Process - A presentation of group theory and group 
dynamics. The instruction in basic group skills includes selecting a 
theory base, designing groups, writing group protocols, analyzing group 
activities, implementing specific group techniques, and evaluating 
progress of group members. Offered fall term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

OT 652. Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics - A developmental 
approach to principles of occupational therapy for the older adult 
including evaluation, treatment planning, treatment techniques, 
discharge planning, and working with care providers. Offered spring 
term each year. One semester hour. 

OT 680. Research Design and Methods in Occupational Therapy 
II - A continuation of OT 580 with an emphasis on sampling 
techniques, survey construction, grant writing, and advanced critique 
and analysis of published research. Offered spring term each year. One 
semester hour. 

OT 685. Research Data Analysis - A practical review of basis data 
analysis techniques used in qualitative and quantitative research formats, 
including experience in using SPSS data analysis software. Offered 
spring term each year. Two semester hours. 

OT 691A. Fieldwork Level IA - Introductory fieldwork level I 
experiences in the area of pediatric occupational therapy settings under 
the supervision of clinicians. Offered spring term each year. One 
semester hour. 

OT 691B. Fieldwork Level IB - Introductory fieldwork level I 
experiences in the area of psychosocial occupational therapy settings 
under the supervision of clinicians. Offered fall and spring terms each 
year. One semester hour. 

OT 691C. Fieldwork Level IC - Introductory fieldwork level I 
experience in the area of physical dysfunction occupational therapy 
settings under the supervision of clinicians. Offered fall term each year. 
One credit hour. 



OT 695B. Clinical Reasoning Seminar B - A seminar that 
accompanies the Fieldwork Level IB with persons who have 
psychosocial disabilities. Students will begin to integrate clinical 
observations and experiences with evaluations, treatment planning, and 
treatment implementation. Offered fall term each year. No credit. 

OT 695C. Clinical Reasoning Seminar C - A seminar that 
accompanies the Fieldwork Level IC with adult physical disabilities. 
Students will begin to integrate clinical observations and experiences 
with evaluations, treatment planning, and treatment implementation. 
Offered fall term each year. No credit. 

OT 710. Occupational Therapy Service Management - The study of 
the occupational therapist's role in service management and the health 
care system. Professional values, attitudes, ethics, and standards are 
emphasized. The study involves skill development in consultation, 
continuous quality improvement, program evaluation, strategic 
planning, marketing, and budgeting. Trends in health care and third- 
party reimbursement are examined. Offered spring term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

OT 740. Advanced Clinical Reasoning Seminar - Seminar that 
prepares students for Level II Fieldwork and entry level occupational 
therapy positions through integration of clinical reasoning principles 
and academic knowledge. Issues that affect the student's successful 
entry into the field of occupational therapy including professional 
behaviors, licensure, legislation and in-depth review, and preparation for 
the NBCOT examination will be included. Offered spring term each 
year. Two semester hours. 

OT 750. Specialization Elective - A course directed toward students' 
exposure to clinical areas of practice of their own choosing. Offered fall 
and spring terms each year. Two semester hours. 

OT 780A, B, and C. Directed Research - Group research project or 
individual research project supervised by appropriate faculty. Students 
will participate in one hour in conjunction with OT 680 and OT 685. 
During the fall semester of their second year, students will take two 
hours of directed research to have release time for data collection. 
Students will defend their research in the final semester. One semester 
hour for 780A and C and two semester hours for 780 B. 

OT 791A. Fieldwork Level IIA - A full-time supervised clinical 
experience designed to develop entry-level professional skills, consisting 
of a three-month full-time affiliation in a selected treatment setting. 
Offered every term. Five semester hours. 

OT 791B. Fieldwork Level IIB - A full-time supervised clinical 
experience designed to develop entry-level professional skills, consisting 
of a three-month full-time affiliation in a selected treatment setting. 
Offered even' term. Five semester hours. 

OT 791C. Fieldwork Level IIC (optional) - A full-time supervised 
clinical experience in a specialized area. A minimum of six weeks 
duration is required. Offered every term. Three to five semester hours. 



OT 695A. Clinical Reasoning Seminar A - A seminar that 
accompanies Fieldwork Level IA in pediatrics. Students will begin to 
integrate clinical observations and experiences with evaluations, 
treatment planning, and treatment implementation. Offered spring term 
each year. No credit. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



128 philosophy | photography 



Philosophy 

Area of Humane Learning 

The philosophy minor supports the following goal of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts. . .and to understand a significant body of material in 
their major fields of study. 

Philosophy involves a thorough examination of the most fundamental 
questions facing human beings. At Milligan, courses in philosophy are 
designed to foster the ability to think critically and analytically, 
communicate clearly and logically, interact with the philosophic 
tradition, and explore the relationship between philosophy and the 
Christian faith. Courses in philosophy also aid students in acquiring the 
intellectual skills needed for integrating knowledge in all areas of human 
inquiry. As a result, the philosophy minor helpfully complements nearly 
any major in the liberal arts, offering additional training and experience 
in critical thinking. Students planning to attend seminary or law school 
are particularly encouraged to consider the benefits of a philosophy 



Philosophy minor (18 hrs) 

Three hours from HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202 (3 hrs) 
Philosophy electives (1 5 hrs) 



Photography 

Area of Performing, Visual and Communicative Arts 

A student may declare a fine arts major with a photography emphasis. 
For further information on this major, refer to the information under 
the listing of fine arts. 

The photography minor fits well with numerous majors including but 
not limited to Bible, business administration, communications, and 
humanities. The study of photography may serve to foster students' 
avocational interests as well as prepare them for more concentrated 
photography studies in the future. 



Fine Arts major - B.A. (38 hrs) 

Photography emphasis 

For more information on the Fine Arts major with photography 
emphasis, see "Fine Arts." 



Photography minor (18 hrs) 

ART 237 Basic Photography (3 hrs) 

ART 310 Intermediate Photography (3 hrs) 

ART 312 Introduction to Color Photography (3 hrs) 

ART 337 Photojournalism (3 hrs) 

ART 466 History of Photography (3 hrs) 

ART 490 Directed Studies or an equivalent (3 hrs) 



Course Descriptions 



PHIL 301. Plato and Aristotle - An introduction to the ancient 
philosophical traditions that have shaped and continue to shape the 
West. Focuses primarily on the works of Plato and Aristotle but also 
attends to the so-called Pre-Socratics and to some later Hellenistic and 
Roman philosophers. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours. 

PHIL 302. Modern Western Philosophy and Its Critics - An 

introduction to several modern philosophical traditions that have 
shaped and continue to shape the West. Focuses not only on important 
modernist philosophers (such as Descartes, Locke, and Kant), but also 
their modernist and postmodernist critics. Offered occasionally. Three 
semester hours. 

PHIL 321. Ethics - An introduction to the character of ethical 
reflection through the study of important philosophical texts and 
traditions of moral reflection, as well as through contemporary literature 
and film. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

PHIL 350. Religions of the World - An introduction to a wide variety 
of religious traditions, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, 
and others. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement 
in the general education core. Offered spring term alternate years. Three 
semester hours. Same as Religion 350. 

PHIL 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings 
which provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. One to three semester hours. 

PHIL 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences 
which provides for individualized study. One to three semester hours. 

PHIL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. One to three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



physical education 129 



Physical Education 

Area of Education 

The physical education minor supports the following goals of Milligan 
College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

■ Students will participate in the activities of a healthy lifestyle such 
as intramurals, intercollegiate sports, musical and theatrical groups, 
student clubs, student government, and other campus-sponsored 
extracurricular endeavors, in preparation for life-long participation 
in similar activities. 

The skills and knowledge gained through the physical education minor 
allow students to pursue jobs in community, school, recreational, or 
industrial settings and provides a springboard into various graduate 
programs. Additional courses are required for teacher licensure. 



HPXS major - B.A. or B.S. (38 hrs) 

Physical education emphasis 

For more information about the Human Performance and Exercise 
Science major with physical education emphasis, see "Human 
Performance and Exercise Science." 



K-12 teacher licensure program 

HPXS majors with an emphasis 
in physical education (see "HPXS) 

HPXS 104 Swimming or 205 Iifeguarding (1 hr) 

HPXS 108 Folk Dance and Rhythmical Activities (1 hr) 

HPXS 151 and 152 Fall/Spring Season Team Sports (2 hrs) 

HPXS 162 Aerobic Fitness (1 hr) 

HPXS 207 Principles of Strength Training (2 hrs) 

HPXS 271 Foundations of Wellness (3 hrs) 

HPXS 301 Teaching Individual and Dual Sports (2 hrs) 

HPXS 308 Measurement and Evaluation (3 hrs) 

HPXS 310a First Aid and CPR (1 hr) 

HPXS 341 Exercise Physiology (4 hrs) 

HPXS 350 Elementary Physical Education Methods (4 hrs) 

HPXS 352 Kinesiology and Biomechanics (4 hrs) 

HPXS 370 Secondary Physical Education Methods (3 hrs) 

HPXS 404 Organization and Management of Physical Education 

and Sports (3 hrs) 
HPXS 405 Motor Behavior (2 hrs) 
HPXS 406 Adapted Physical Education (2 hrs) 



Approval to student teach is granted to students who have been fully 
admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program and 
who maintain eligibility at that level. In addition to meeting established 
minimum grade point averages and Tennessee-approved PPST scores, 
approval to student teacher requires: 

1. Maintaining a minimum overall 2.75 grade-point average 

2. Earning a minimum grade of C- in all required teacher 

education courses in the program of study 

3. Obtaining liability insurance 

4. Verification of CPR and/or first aid proficiency 

5. Documentation of emerging teaching competencies in a 

portfolio 

6. Positive review by the Admission and Retention Committee 

Additional courses required for licensure: 

EDUC 1 50 Introduction to Education (2 hrs) 

EDUC 152 Technology in Education (1 hr) 

EDUC 306 Middle Grades and Secondary Education Foundations 

(3 hrs) 
EDUC 455 Student Teaching K-12 (12 hrs) 
EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar (1 hr) 
PSYC 253 Child Development (3 hrs) 

For additional information about the teacher licensure program see the 
Education: Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



Physical Education minor (19 hrs) 

HPXS 101 Fitness for Life (1 hr) 

HPXS 151 Fall Season Team Sports or 152 Spring Season Team 

Sports (1 hr) 
HPXS 162 Aerobic Fitness (1 hr) 
HPXS 271 Foundations of Wellness (3 hrs) 
HPXS 301 Teaching Individual and Dual Sports (2 hrs) 
HPXS 308 Measurement and Evaluation (3 hrs) 
HPXS 310a First Aid and CPR (1 hr) 
HPXS 404 Organization and Management of Physical Education 

and Sports (3 hrs) 
HPXS 405 Motor Behavior (2 hrs) 
HPXS 406 Adapted Physical Education (2 hrs) 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



130 physical science | physics 



Physical Science 

Area of Scientific Learning 

The physical science minor supports the following goals of Milligan 
College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major field of study. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through awareness of 
health issues, appreciation for both the arts and sciences, 
stewardship of resources, and preparation for graduate studies and 
a rewarding career or profession. 

■ Students may seek to have a general exposure to the fields of 
chemistry and physics through the physical science minor. The 
flexibility which this minor allows a student who is interested in 
science as a complement to their chosen major may encourage 
more students to pursue their interest in the physical sciences. 



Physical Science minor (20 hrs) 

CHEM 151 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry (4 hrs) 
CHEM 170 and 171 General Chemistry (8 hrs) 
PHYS 104 Earth and Space Science (4 hrs) 
PHYS 203 General Physics/Calculus (4 hrs) 



Physics 

Area of Scientific Learning 



The physics course offerings are intended to prepare the student with a 
background appropriate to career pursuits. Physics 104 Earth and Space 
Science is intended to give non-science majors a broad exposure to 
general concepts. Physics 203 and 204 General Physics/Calculus are the 
required one-year physics sequence taken by most science majors. 

PHYS 104. Earth and Space Science - A study of the structure and 
mechanical principles of the universe. Recommended for students with 
backgrounds in high school algebra and science. Not applicable toward 
a science major except for those pursuing middle grades licensure. 
Offered every term. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory 
per week. Four semester hours. 

PHYS 203-204. General Physics /Calculus - A study of the 
fundamental principles of mechanics and thermodynamics in the first 
semester and electricity and magnetism, wave motions, sound, light, and 
modern physics in the second semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 1 
or consent of the instructor. Offered as a year sequence beginning with 
the fall term every year. Three hours lecture and one two-hour 
laboratory per week. Four semester hours each semester. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



political science 131 



Political Science 

Area of Social Learning 

The political science minor is designed for those who wish to study law, 
prepare for government service, or teach in a school setting. Political 
science might be taken as a valuable adjunct to a major in history or 
business administration and economics. (Also see American Studies 
Program.) 

The political science minor supports the following goals of Milligan 
College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will demonstrate social responsibility in numerous ways. 

The political science minor provides a broad foundation in the study of 
the political process, the function of government and governmental 
agencies, and the relationships among levels of government as well as 
the peoples served by those governments and their agencies. Students 
completing this minor will: (1) gain a knowledge foundation which they 
might apply to their major area of study; (2) be conversant with the 
objectives and functions of government agencies; (3) display through 
their writing and participation in classes within the minor an increasing 
knowledge and appreciation of the responsibilities, tasks, and limits of 
governments/agencies; (4) demonstrate an awareness of the roles of 
citizenship at the local and broader levels. 



Political Science minor (18 hrs) 

POLS 202 American National Government (3 hrs) 
POLS 203 State and Local Government (3 hrs) 
POLS 320 Constitutional Law (3 hrs) 
POLS 402 Political Theory (Ideology) (3 hrs) 
Six hours of political science electives 

History majors pursuing 
secondary teaching licensure 

History majors pursuing secondary teaching licensure may add a 
government endorsement by adding this minor and appropriate student 
teaching experience to their program of study. 



Course Descriptions 



POLS 202. American National Government - A survey of the 
principles of the American federal system and a study of the structure 
and function of the national government. Special attention is given to 
the historical development of the American Constitution and the 
judicial branch of the government as arbiter in determining the 
respective limits of national and state power. Selected Court cases are 
studied. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

POLS 203. State and Local Government - A study of the structure 
and function of state and local governments in the United States and 
the political environment in which they exist. Prerequisite: Political 
Science 202. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours. 



POLS 290. Independent Study - Individualized study to enable the 
student either to study material in a field not now in the curriculum or 
to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a 
single course. Not open to freshmen. To be arranged. One to three 
semester hours. 

POLS 320. Constitutional Law - A survey of the historical 
development of the American Constitution with emphasis on the role 
of the judicial branch of the government as arbiter in determining the 
respective limits on national and state power, in protecting the 
individual against the national and state activity which offends the Bill 
of Rights and other constitutional guarantees of liberty and property, 
and in securing civil rights. Selected Supreme Court cases will be 
studied. Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

POLS 350. The Supreme Court in American History - An 

examination of the personalities, procedures, and rulings of the U.S. 
Supreme Court, from its inception to today, from an historical 
perspective. Offered fall semester alternate years. Three semester hours. 

POLS 360. The Presidency - An emphasis upon topics regarding the 
President of the United States. The course focuses upon some particular 
aspect of the office such as budgeting rather than serve as a general 
review. Two semester hours. Available usually in American Studies 
Program. 

POLS 361. Domestic Politics - The content of the course varies with 
each offering. Possible topics include human life legislation, the United 
States Congress, and other contemporary issues. Two semester hours. 
Available usually in American Studies Program. 

POLS 370. International Affairs - A study of issues relating to 
problems facing the United States in international relations. The course 
focuses upon a topic such as nuclear proliferation or disarmament. Two 
semester hours. Available usually in American Studies Program. 

POLS 402. Political Theory (Ideology) - A comparative study of four 
contemporary ideologies-Fascism, Communism, Conservatism, and 
Liberalism-and their implications for the state, the individual, progress, 
leaders and followers, freedom, justice, fraternity, etc. Offered spring 
term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

POLS 489. Directed Readings - Supervised independent readings for 
a greater depth or a different approach than provided in other courses. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 202. To be arranged. One to three 
semester hours. 

POLS 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences 
which provides for individualized study. TBA. One to three semester 
hours. 

POLS 491. Field Work - A practicum experience that involves the 
student in a supervised position in government for the joint purpose of 
learning about government and possible professional choices. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 202. To be arranged. One to three 
semester hours. 

POLS 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depdi 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. Prerequisite: Political Science 202. To be announced. One to 
three semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



132 pre-professional programs | psychology 



Pre-Professional 
Programs 

(Medical and Law students) 

The pre-medical and pre-dental programs at Milligan College are highly 
competitive and quite variable, depending upon the student's choice of 
major and minor. Milligan College graduates have generally been 
successful in obtaining admission to medical and dental schools 
throughout the nation. Additional information may be obtained from 
the pre-medical and pre-dental advisers. 

Milligan College does not recommend or offer a major in "pre-law" as 
such. This stand is in keeping with both the broad educational 
philosophy of Milligan College and the philosophy expressed by the 
Statement of the Association of American Law Schools on Prelegal 
Education. American law schools do not encourage the undergraduate 
student to "learn the law," but rather stress the necessity of the pre-law 
student's acquiring certain comprehensive skills, such as 
"comprehension and expression in words," "critical understanding of 
human institutions and values," and the development of "creative 
power of thinking." While a student planning for a specific phase of the 
law (e.g., tax law) may find certain undergraduate majors or courses 
desirable (e.g., business or accounting), any solid academic major is 
equally acceptable to American law schools and recommended by 
Milligan College. 

Students considering law school who wish to have exposure to 
foundational legal subjects are encouraged to obtain a minor in Legal 
Studies. The courses in Milligan's Legal Studies minor are designed to 
enhance knowledge of the American legal system, the legal profession 
and foundational legal topics. Embracing a Christian world-view, the 
Legal Studies minor will help students develop an appreciation for the 
unique responsibility Christian legal professionals have in society. 



The baccalaureate degree is conferred by Milligan College upon a 
student who enters a standard medical or law college before completion 
of the baccalaureate degree, subject to the following conditions: (1) 
Completion of six semesters or ninety hours in residence in Milligan 
College; (2) Fulfillment of all general education requirements and 
completion of a minor; and (3) Submission to the registrar of the credits 
earned in the medical or law school. 



Psychology 

Area of Social Learning 

The mission of the psychology major at Milligan College is related to 
the objectives of the College. Students who pursue the study of 
psychology are challenged to display sound scholarship in the field 
through their reading and analyzing sources within the realm of 
psychology. The students should be familiar with and able to 
communicate their familiarity and analyses clearly and effectively. The 
students should be able to use this knowledge base in psychology to 
appreciate areas of the Lord's creation and to understand the inter- 
relatedness of all learning. Students of psychology should display a sense 
of ministry through their knowledge of psychology and a willingness to 
use their knowledge in service and ministry to others. 

The specific objectives of the psychology major are: 

■ When completing the program of study, students should be 
familiar with the knowledge bases within the study of psychology. 
Examples of these bases include, but are not limited to, lifespan 
development, research methodology, statistical tools, personality, 
systems and history of the field. 

■ Students should be reading and appreciating research in the fields 
of psychology at increasing levels of sophistication as the students 
progress through the psychology program. 

■ Students should be able to communicate in written and verbal 
media their knowledge and comprehension of psychology. 

■ Students should be able to generate research. 

■ Students should develop a tolerance and appreciation of persons 
who differ from themselves in culture, ethnicity, socioeconomic 
status, age, gender, and other characteristics. 

The psychology curriculum emphasizes the principles and applications 
of substantive psychological knowledge both as a natural science and as 
a social science. The major and minor provide a broad background in 
psychology and offer students the opportunities, if desired, to pursue 
specialization in an interest area. 

The field of psychology has been undergoing rapid change. New 
professional opportunities are constantly evolving. In response to this 
change, students may choose one of two emphases to fulfill the 
requirements for a degree in psychology. The general psychology 
emphasis offers flexibility while also ensuring that students have a broad 
understanding of the field and its applications. Students who plan to 
pursue teaching licensure or careers in areas other than psychology (e.g., 
youth ministry) may find this emphasis appealing. 

The pre-professional emphasis is designed to prepare students for post- 
graduate education in psychology or related fields (e.g., occupational 
therapy). Students who pursue this emphasis are required to 
demonstrate proficiency in research by completing an independent 
research project. In addition, students choosing the pre-professional 
emphasis will learn about the available careers in psychology' and the 
kinds of graduate programs available. This is accomplished through 
both a specific course (PSYC 200) and the requirement of an internship. 
Students are strongly encouraged to talk with their adviser before 
selecting either of the two emphases. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



psychology 133 



Psychology major - B.A. or B.S. 

General emphasis (33 hrs) 

PSYC 250 General Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 252 Developmental Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 259 Research Methods in Psychology I (3 hrs) 

PSYC 350 Social Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 353 Theories of Personality (3 hrs) 

PSYC 401 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 422 Learning and Memory OR 427 Physiological 

Psychology (3 hrs) 
MATH 213 Statistics (3 hrs) 
Elective hours in psychology to be chosen in consultation with an 

adviser (9 hrs) 

The Bachelor of Science degree in psychology with a general emphasis 
requires 33 hours in the major. The Bachelor of Arts degree with this 
emphasis requires the intermediate year of a foreign language in 
addition to the 33 hours in the major. Those completing the major must 
demonstrate facility in the usage of computers in research and statistics. 
This is accomplished typically through the PSYC 259 course. 

Pre-Professional emphasis (39 hrs) 

PSYC 200 Career Preparation in Psychology (1 hr) 

PSYC 250 General Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 252 Developmental Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 259 Research Methods in Psychology I (3 hrs) 

PSYC 350 Social Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 353 Theories of Personality (3 hrs) 

PSYC 359 Research Methods in Psychology II (3 hrs) 

PSYC 360 Independent Research Project in Psychology (2 hrs) 

PSYC 401 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 422 Learning and Memory OR 427 Physiological 

Psychology (3 hrs) 
PSYC 491 Field Work in Psychology (at least 3 hrs) 
MATH 213 Statistics (3 hrs) 
Elective hours in psychology to be chosen in consultation with an 

adviser (6 hrs) 

The Bachelor of Science degree in psychology with a pre-professional 
emphasis requires 39 hours in the major. The Bachelor of Arts degree 
with this emphasis requires the intermediate year of a foreign language 
in addition to the 39 hours in the major. Those completing the major 
must demonstrate facility in the usage of computers in research and 
statistics. This is accomplished typically through the courses PSYC 259 
and 359. Students in the pre-professional emphasis will be expected to 
maintain a minimum overall grade point average of 2.75. 

Licensure 

For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 

Secondary (grades 9-12) teaching licensure 

Psychology major (general emphasis) with modifications - 
B.A. or B.S. (36 hrs) 

PSYC 250 General Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 252 Developmental Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 253 Child Development (3 hrs) 

PSYC 259 Research Methods I (3 hrs) 

PSYC 350 Social Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 353 Theories of Personality (3 hrs) 

PSYC 357 Intro to the Theory and Practice of Counseling (3 hrs) 

PSYC 359 Research Methods II (3 hrs) 

PSYC 401 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hrs) 

PSYC 422 Learning and Memory (3 hrs) 

MATH 213 Statistics (3 hrs) 

PSYC elective (3 hrs) 



Psychology minor (18 hrs) 

PSYC 250 General Psychology (3 hrs) 
PSYC 252 Developmental Psychology (3 hrs) 
PSYC 350 Social Psychology (3 hrs) ' 
Elective hours in psychology (9 hrs) 



Course Descriptions 

PSYC 100. Introduction to College and Calling - A course focusing 
on those behaviors necessary to succeed in college, in careers, and in life 
in general. These include career exploration, management of resources 
such as time and money, and a growing awareness of self. Required of 
all freshmen during the first semester of attendance. Offered fall term 
each year. One semester hour. 

PSYC 200. Career Preparation in Psychology - An introduction to 
career options for psychology students. The course helps students to 
understand the variety of sub-fields within psychology and the different 
careers that are available within each. Students begin to explore career 
options and make preparations for reaching occupational goals, such as 
getting into graduate school. Offered spring term each year. One 
semester hour. 

PSYC 250. General Psychology - An introduction to the discipline of 
psychology. The study covers the background, methodology, and major 
findings from each of the major sub-areas of psychology. Offered every 
term. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 252. Developmental Psychology - An introduction to 
development through the entire life span, the realms of emotional, 
social, physical, and cognitive growth and change; the major theories of 
development, the interactions and reciprocities among physical, 
psychological, social, familial, and individual issues. The study is 
applicable to students in psychology, nursing, education, ministry, and 
any student who desires a knowledge and appreciation of change and 
stability, growth and atrophy, throughout life. Offered every term. 
Three semester hours. 

PSYC 253. Child Development - An in-depth study of the physical, 
cognitive, social, and emotional development of the child from birth 
through adolescence. Development, care, and guidance of the child are 
examined in relationship to major theories of child and adolescent 
development. This course is designed for professionals who work with 
infants, children, and adolescents in a variety of settings. Offered spring 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 254. Adolescent Development - An introduction to the stage 
of adolescence including focus on physical, psychological, and primarily 
emotional development during the teen years. Adolescence is a critical 
period of development in which one's identity as an individual grows 
significantly. The tools of this course are the biographies of adolescents, 
materials from popular culture, and readings of the social nature of the 
lives of teens. Offered every other spring. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 259. Research Methods in Psychology I - A studv of research 
methodologies in psychology with special emphasis upon 
experimentation. The study covers research planning, experimental 
design, data collection and analysis, and the construction of models and 
theories. Laboratory work emphasizes application of these concepts. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: PSYC 250 or Mathematics 213. Offered fall 
term each year. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 260. Sport Psychology - An overview of the psychological 
factors affecting behavior in exercise and sport settings. The course 
examines the major topics in sport psychology, including personality, 
motivation, arousal, imagery, goal setting, and burnout. The goal is that 
students will be able to apply this knowledge to instructional, training, 
and rehabilitation settings. Offered spring term alternate years. Three 
semester hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



134 psychology 



PSYC 280. Media Effects on Children and Adolescents - A seminar 
course in media literacy with an emphasis on the psychological, social, 
and educational effects on children and adolescents. The course 
includes discussion of the evolving nature of media and laws governing 
them. Such media include television, movies, the Internet, newspapers, 
magazines, music, and interactive video games. Discussion and 
assignments focus on the relative impact of these media on things such 
as body image, drug and alcohol use, sexuality, sociability, morality, and 
cognitive development. An emphasis is placed on becoming a media 
literacy advocate within one's own family, school, and community. 
Offered once each year. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the 
student either to examine material not in the curriculum or to facilitate 
an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. 
Not open to freshmen. Offered as needed. One to three semester 
hours. 

PSYC 350. Social Psychology - A study of the individual in society. 
Some emphasis is given to research and experimentation. Offered every 
term. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 353. Theories of Personality - An examination of major 
theories of personality from the late 1 800s to the present. The course 
focuses particularly on founders and influential theorists associated with 
the major theories. Each theory is examined in terms of a Christian 
worldview. Prerequisite: PSYC 250. Offered spring term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

PSYC 356. Cross-Cultural Psychology - An examination of culture's 
influence on behavior and thought. Students are expected to develop an 
understanding of cultural diversity from a psychological perspective. 
Students participate in a service-learning experience throughout the 
semester and visit culturally relevant sites on a class trip. The course 
includes explorations of cross-cultural perspectives on cognition, 
intelligence, health, emotion, communication, human development, 
personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. This course 
fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education 
core. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 357. Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Counseling 

- An introduction to counseling and psychotherapy primarily by 
practicing the skills that constitute the counseling process. The aim is to 
utilize class members for the practical applications and implementation 
of techniques in the therapeutic process, as well as to develop a 
balanced view of the major concepts of various therapies. Prerequisite: 
PSYC 250. Offered spring term each vear and fall term alternate years. 
Three semester hours. 

PSYC 358. Abnormal Psychology - A careful consideration of the 
data and principles which have proved helpful in interpreting deviations 
from normal behavior. Offered fall term each year. Three semester 
hours. 

PSYC 359. Research Methods in Psychology II - An examination of 
the major research methodologies used by psychologists including both 
experimental and corelational designs. The course includes an expanded 
and advanced discussion of topics previously covered in Research 
Methods in Psychology I (PSYC 259), such as research ethics, 
measurement theory, inferential statistics, and manuscript preparation. 
Through this course, students should have developed a research 
proposal including a review of the literature, a sound research 
hypothesis, and plans for appropriate data analysis. Students in the pre- 
professional track are required to complete the project the following 
semester (while enrolled in PSYC 360). Prerequisites: PSYC 259 and 
MATH 213. Offered fall term each vear. Three semester hours. 



PSYC 360. Independent Research Project in Psychology - A course 
in which the student conducts the research project begun in PSYC 359 
under the supervision of the course instructor. Requirements include a 
research proposal, approval from the Miliigan Institutional Review 
Board, data collection, appropriate statistical analyses, discussion of 
results, preparation of a final manuscript according to the APA 
Publication Manual, and presentation of findings at a regional 
conference. Prerequisites: PSYC 259 and 359 and MATH 213. Offered 
spring term each year. Two semester hours. 

PSYC 401. History and Systems of Psychology - An overview of the 
historical context and ecclesiastical, social, and cultural milieus in which 
the contemporary psychological theories evolved. History and Systems 
of Psychology is a capstone course and should be taken in the senior 
year. Offered every fall and every other spring. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 422. Learning and Memory - A study of basic principles of 
learning and memory and their applications. The controversy of the 
relative effects of nature and nurture on learning is studied, as are types 
of learning, methods of acquisition, and memory enhancement. Offered 
fall term each year and spring term alternate years. Three semester 
hours. 

PSYC 427. Physiological Psychology - An examination of current 
developments in the field of physiological psychology. The course 
includes an exploration of the physiological bases of emotion, sleep, 
sexual behavior, hunger and thirst, learning and memory, 
psychopathology, and drug use and abuse. Prerequisites: PSYC 250 and 
259. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

PSYC 480. Seminar on Vietnam - A survey of the Vietnam era in 
United States history. This course examines precursors in the United 
States and Southeast Asia, the Vietnam era itself, and the war's legacies 
to the nation and its people. Both historical and psychological issues are 
examined. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in 
the general education requirements. Offered spring term even years. 
Three semester hours. 

PSYC 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings 
which provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. To be arranged. One to three semester hours. 

PSYC 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences 
which provides for individualized study. To be arranged. One to three 
semester hours. 

PSYC 491. Field Work in Psychology - Supervised field work in 
various institutions and agencies, including children's homes, schools, 
homes for the aging, delinquency and probation programs and work 
with other agencies. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered 
every term. Three to six semester hours. 

PSYC 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered van' from semester to 
semester. To be announced. One to three semester hours. 



miliigan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



public leadership and service 135 



Public Leadership 
and Service 

Area of Social Learning 

The public leadership and service major supports the following goals of 
Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate social responsibility in numerous ways, 
such as serving in churches, on the mission field (domestic and 
foreign), and with social agencies; mentoring and protecting 
others; and displaying increased understanding of other cultures. 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and natural and social sciences, and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

The public leadership and service major prepares students to be 
Christian leaders for both private and public arenas, but especially in the 
public service areas such as non-profit organizations and governmental 
service. In particular graduates of this program should be prepared to: 
(1) take the ministry of Jesus Christ to those who need to be fed, 
clothed, protected and defended as the least in the world, (2) produce 
public services ministers who in government and agency settings will 
advocate effectively the needs of the least and humblest of these, (3) 
develop advocates who are able to speak articulately to the issues of 
social justice and diversity for all of the citizens of one's community, 
nation, and world. 

Graduates with a major in public leadership and service are expected to 
(1) demonstrate a broad knowledge of political, sociological, 
communication, and economic theory to be equipped for service in 
public agencies, (2) demonstrate the ability to engage in independent 
research in a particular subject dealing with public service, (3) 
demonstrate an increased awareness of issues involving public service 
through breadth of courses and an internship experience, (4) 
demonstrate the development of leadership skills necessary for engaging 
ethically and actively in the public arena. 

The public leadership and service program consists of 48 to 50 semester 
hours of credit and requires a minimum of 2.25 grade point average in 
the major to graduate. It is available only as a Bachelor of Arts degree. 
This major offers three possible emphases: one offered entirely at the 
Milligan College campus that offers a broad exposure to academic 
topics preparatory for public service; one that is offered coordinated 
with an international setting or agency; and one that is coordinated with 
the CCCU American Studies Program in Washington, D.C. The course 
requirements are slightly different for each emphasis. 



On M 


Emphasis One 
lliqan College Campus Exclusively 




Required Core Courses (39 hrs) 


COMM 341 OR 345 


Principles of Organizational Communication OR 
Dynamics of Group Communication (3 hrs) 


ECON 201 


Macroeconomic Principles (3 hrs) 


ECON 202 


Microeconomic Principles (3 hrs) 


MATH 213 


Statistics (3 hrs) 


POLS 202 OR 203 


American National Government OR State and Local 
Government (3 hrs) 


POLS 402 


Political Theory (Ideology) (3 hrs) 


POLS 490 or 491 


Directed Studies or Field Work (3 hrs) 


PL&S 250 


Introduction to Leadership (3 hrs) 


PL&S 350 


Poverty Experience (3 hrs) 


PL&S 400 


Capstone Experience (3 hrs) 


SOCL 201 


Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs! 


SOCL 311 


Social Problems (3 hrs) 


SOCL 401 OR 
PSYC 259 


Sociological Research OR Research Methods 1 (3 hrs) 




Electives (6 hrs) selected from the following: 


ACCT 211 


Introductory Accounting 1 (3 hrs) 


ACCT 212 


Introductory Accounting II (3 hrs) 


ACCT 315 


Not-For-Profit Accounting (3 hrs) 


COMM 413 


Public Relations Practice (3 hrs) 


COMM 470 


Film and Television Criticism (3 hrs) 


ECON 460 


History of Economic Thought (3 hrs) 


HIST 209 OR 210 


United States History Survey 1 OR II (3 hrs) 


HIST 380 


The United States in the Twentieth Century (3 hrs) 


LS310 


Philosophy of Law (3 hrsi 


PHIL 321 


Ethics (3 hrs) 


POLS 361 


Domestic Politics (2 hrs) 


PSYC 350 


Social Psychology (3 hrs) 


SOCL 360 


Aspects of Intercultural Studies (3 hrsi 



SOCL 470 



Health, Illness, and Health Care Systems (3 hrs) 



Emphasis Two 
With One Semester at CCCU International Setting 




Required Core Courses (40 hrs) 


COMM 341 OR 345 


Principles of Organizational Communication OR 
Dynamics of Group Communication (3 hrs) 


ECON 201 


Macroeconomic Principles (3 hrs) 


ECON 202 


Microeconomic Principles (3 hrs) 


MATH 213 


Statistics (3 hrs) 


PL&S 250 


Introduction to Leadership (3 hrs) 


PL&S 340a 


CCCU International Leadership and Internship (16 hrs) 


PL&S 400 


Capstone Experience (3 hrs) 


SOCL 201 


Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) 


SOCL 401 OR 
PSYC 259 


Sociological Research OR Research Methods 1 (3 hrs) 




Electives (6 hrs) selected from the following: 


ACCT 211 


Introductory Accounting 1 (3 hrs) 


ACCT 212 


Introductory Accounting II (3 hrs) 


ACCT 315 


Not-For-Profit Accounting (3 hrs) 


COMM 413 


Public Relations Practices (3 hrs) 


COMM 470 


Film and Television Criticism (3 hrs) 


ECON 460 


History of Economic Thought (3 hrs) 


HIST 209 OR 210 


U. S. History Survey 1 OR II (3 hrs) 


HIST 380 


The United States in the Twentieth Century (3 hrs) 


LS310 


Philosophy of Law (3 hrs) 


PHIL 321 


Ethics (3 hrs) 


POLS 361 


Domestic Politics (2 hrs) 


PSYC 350 


Social Psychology (3 hrs) 


S0CI 360 


Aspects of Intercultural Studies (3 hrs) 



SOCL 470 



Health, Illness, and Health Care Systems (3 hrs) 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



136 public leadership and service 



Emphasis Three 
With One Semester at CCCU American Studies Program 




Required Core Courses (40 hrs) 


COMM 3410R 345 


Principles of Organizational Communication OR 
Dynamics of Group Communication (3 hrs) 


ECON 201 


Macroeconomic Principles (3 hrs) 


ECON 202 


Microeconomic Principles (3 hrs) 


MATH 213 


Statistics (3 hrs) 


PL&S 250 


Introduction to Leadership (3 hrs) 


PL&S 340b 


CCCU American Studies Program (16 hrs) 


PL&S 400 


Capstone Experience (3 hrs) 


S0CL201 


Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) 


SOCL 4010R PSYC 259 


Sociological Research OR Research Methods 1 (3 hrs) 


Electives (6 hrs) selected from the following: 


ACCT 211 


Introductory Accounting 1 (3 hrs) 


ACCT 212 


Introductory Accounting II (3 hrs) 


ACCT 315 


Not-For-Profit Accounting (3 hrs) 


COMM 413 


Public Relations Practices (3 hrs 


COMM 470 


Film and Television Criticism (3 hrs) 


ECON 460 


History of Economic Thought (3 hrs) 


Choose one from the 
following: HIST 206, 
208, 331, 332, 333. 
334, 450, 480 


History course international in focus (3 hrs) 


HIST 380 


The United States in the Twentieth Century (3 hrs) 


LS 310 


Philosophy of Law (3 hrs) 


PHIL 321 


Ethics (3 hrs) 


POLS 361 


Domestic Politics (2 hrs) 


PSYC 350 


Social Psychology (3 hrs) 


SOCL 360 


Aspects of Intercultural Studies (3 hrs) 



SOCL 470 



Health, Illness, and Health Care Systems (3 hrs) 



Course descriptions 



PL&S 250. Introduction to Leadership - A course in which students 
learn theories and practices of leadership, as well as examples of ethical 
leadership behavior. The course explores the creation of a personal 
vision, interactions in large and small groups, the needs of leaders and 
of members of groups, and styles/methods of leadership. The course 
includes opportunities for a service learning project where students 
observe and practice aspects of leadership. Offered fall term each year. 
Three semester hours. 

PL&S 340a. CCCU International Leadership and Internship - An 

experience, under the auspices of the Council of Christian Colleges and 
Universities or other not-for-profit ministerial or government agencies, 
which provides students an opportunity for examination of other 
geographic and cultural regions of the world, in that region. The CCCU 
international programs include the following: Australia Studies Centre; 
China Studies Program; Latin American Studies Program; Middle East 
Studies Program; Russian Studies Program; Uganda Studies Program. 
This experiential semester allows the diversity of cultures and 
nationalities to be seen without the filters which are in place seeing the 
diversity through the eyes of others-the news media, the instructors' 
biases, parental thinking-or through the students' own preconceptions. 
This internship experience provides a forum to listen to persons of 
religious faiths, economic and educational levels, as well as political and 
economic thinking different than those confronted in one's comfort 
zone in the United States. Offering to be arranged. Sixteen semester 
hours. 



PL&S 340b. CCCU American Studies Program - A study expenence 
with the American Studies Program under the auspices of the Council 
of Christian Colleges and Universities. Founded in 1976, the American 
Studies Program has served hundreds of students from member 
institutions as a ''Washington, D.C. campus." ASP uses Washington as a 
stimulating educational laboratory where collegians gain hands-on 
experience with an internship in their chosen field. Internships are 
tailored to fit the student's talents and aspirations and are available in a 
wide range of fields. They also explore pressing national and 
international issues in public policy seminars which are issue-oriented, 
interdisciplinary, and led by ASP faculty and Washington professionals. 
ASP bridges classroom and marketplace, combining biblical reflection, 
policy analysis, and real-world experience. Students are exposed to on- 
the-job learning that helps them build for their future and gain 
perspective on the calling of God for their lives. They are challenged in 
a rigorous course of study to discover for themselves the meaning of 
Christ's lordship in putting their beliefs into practice. The aim of the 
program is to help Council schools prepare their students to live 
faithfully in contemporary society as followers of Christ. Offering to be 
arranged. Sixteen semester hours. 

PL&S 350. Poverty Experience - An experience for the student with 
an agency typically in the Tri-Cities region which surrounds the College 
campus. Examples of the agencies with which the student might be 
placed include the Salvation Army, the Good Samaritan Ministries, 
Habitat for Humanity, the Appalachian Service Project, the Johnson 
City Downtown Clinic, or a local law enforcement agency or court 
system. However, this experience might be gained in other locales 
which the student might propose. The format is working with those in 
ministry, social work, casework, and/or mental health occupations 
which provide care to those who are in material and physical need- 
lacking proper housing, food, safety, medical care, educational 
opportunities, and support. The student spends ten hours weekly in the 
field. Offering to be arranged. Six semester hours. 

PL&S 400. Capstone Experience - A seminar in which the students 
and faculty member(s) challenge one another through readings, 
experiences, dialogues, to develop a philosophy of ministry, a 
conviction of partnership, a sense of Matthew 25:31 ff, in the 
relationships which Christians have with/to their brothers and sisters 
who have been placed by education, family, society, disability, etc., in a 
position of handicap in achieving what the world values and finds 
attractive. This course challenges the student and the faculty to face the 
problems of the world's downtrodden rather than, in the words of Pink 
Floyd, turning away. Offered spring term each year. Three semester 
hours. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



religion | sociology 137 



Religion 

Area of Biblical Learning 

RELG 350. Religions of the World - A comparative investigation of 
the structure and content of primitive, ancient, and contemporary 
religions. The study includes consideration of major doctrines, figures, 
and developments. Same as PHIL 350. This course fulfills the ethnic 
studies course requirement in the general education core. Prerequisites: 
BIBL 123 and 124. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester 
hours. 

RELG 351. Philosophy of Religion - A study of the nature and 
meaning of religion within various worldviews, including a comparative 
study of the more important religious movements. Prerequisite: either 
HUMN 202, or PHIL 301 and 302. Offered periodically. Three 
semester hours. 

RELG 421. Sociology of Religion - A study of interactive 
relationships between religious and other social institutions with special 
attention to the contemporary American religious scene. Same as SOCL 
421. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

RELG 430. Servanthood in the Third Millennium - An examination 
of the nature of servanthood and the formation of the servant of Christ 
for the world. Topics include identity of the servant, spiritual formation, 
the role of community, the servant and culture, preparation for service, 
and serving across cultural lines. Same as CMIN 430. Prerequisites: 
BIBL 123 and 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

RELG 440. The Religions, Peoples, and Cultures of Africa - An 

introduction to the continent and peoples of Africa. Topics include 
African history, geography, religious life, cultural diversity, historical and 
current events on the African continent, and missions in Africa. This 
course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirements in the general 
education core. Same as SOCL 440. Offered periodically. Three 
semester hours. 

RELG 460. Folk Religion - An introduction to the institutions and 
phenomenology of folk religions within the North American context 
and around the world. Topics include an examination of folk world 
views, practices, and belief systems in diverse cultures, with particular 
attention given to missiological implications. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 
and 124. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

RELG 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered periodically. One to 
three semester hours. 



Sociology 

Area of Social Learning 

The sociology major supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically; to communicate clearly 
and effectively; to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts and the natural and social sciences; and to understand a 
significant body of material in their major fields of study. 

■ Students will demonstrate social responsibility in numerous ways, 
such as serving in churches, on the mission field (domestic and 
foreign), and with social agencies; mentoring, nurturing, and 
protecting others; and displaying increased understanding of and 
experience with other cultures. 

The sociology curriculum emphasizes the principles and application of 
sociological knowledge. The major and minor are designed to ensure 
that each student receives a broad background in sociology. The 
sociology curriculum is designed for the student preparing for a variety 
of careers, including but not limited to academic sociology (research 
and/or teaching), and social agency and social service work. The 
sociology curriculum also contributes to the application of sociological 
principles to daily life. 

Graduates with a major in sociology are expected to (1) demonstrate 
knowledge of core concepts in sociology and qualitative and 
quantitative research and analysis skills appropriate to the field of 
sociology; (2) demonstrate knowledge of and appreciation for people 
who differ from themselves in cultural background, ethnicity, 
socioeconomic status, age, gender or other socially significant 
characteristics; (3) participate in community service that will both 
enhance their understanding of course materials and give them 
experience that will assist them in starting on a lifetime commitment to 
service; and (4) be prepared for acceptance into a graduate program in 
sociology or a related field. 



Sociology major - B.A. or B.S. 
(30 hrs or 36 hrs) 

PSYC 350 Social Psychology (3 hrs) 
SOCL 201 Introduction to Sociology' (3 hrs) 
SOCL 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs) 
SOCL 21 1 Social Problems or 312 Gender and Society (3 hrs) 
SOCL 303 Family (3 hrs) 
SOCL 314 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 hrs) 
SOCL 401 Sociological Research (3 hrs) 
SOCL 451 Sociological Theory (3 hrs) 
SOCL 491 Field Work in Sociology (3 or 6 hrs) 
Elective hours in sociology (0-9 hrs, depending upon degree type 
and number of hours of field work) 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology requires foreign language 
proficiency through the intermediate year of a modern foreign language 
plus 30 hours in the major. The Bachelor of Science degree in sociology 
requires 36 hours in the major. Those completing the major must 
demonstrate computer competency. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



138 sociology 



Secondary (Grades 9-12) 
teaching licensure (30 hrs) 

For sociology majors pursuing secondary (Grades 9-12) teaching 
licensure (30 hrs), see the Education: Licensure Programs section of the 
Catalog for additional information, including a list of courses required 
for licensure. 



Sociology minor (18 hrs) 

PSYC 250 General Psychology (3 hrs) 

SOCL 201 Introduction to Sociology (3 hrs) 

SOCL 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs) 

SOCL 303 Family (3 hrs) 

SOCL 451 Sociological Theory (3 hrs) 

Elective hours in sociology (3 hrs) 



Students pursuing the missions emphasis in the Bible major must also 
complete a modified minor in sociology comprised of SOCL 210 and 
15 additional hours of sociology courses selected from SOCL 303, 314, 
360, 421, 451, and 461 (or approved Bible and sociology electives). 



Course Descriptions 

SOCL 201. Introduction to Sociology - A scientific study of human 
society and the various means by which individuals and groups adjust to 
each other and to their physical and social environment. Offered every 
term. Three semester hours. 

SOCL 210. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - A study of the 
dynamics of culture and society: folkways, mores, and institutions and 
their significance for comprehending the variations in contemporary 
cultural orientations, customs, and manners. Available to sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course 
requirement in the general education core. Offered spring semester. 
Three semester hours. 

SOCL 211. Social Problems - An application of sociological 
perspectives to understanding major problems confronted in American 
society and internationally. Topics include crime and delinquency; 
poverty; homelessness; substance abuse; family and sexual violence; 
urban problems; ethnic, racial, and political conflicts; and the social 
dimensions of environmental issues. Offered fall term alternate years. 
Three semester hours. 

SOCL 221. Latin American Cultures - An introduction to Latin 
America, focusing on the social, political, economic, religious, and other 
characteristics of many different Latin American cultures. This course 
employs research findings and perspectives from a number of different 
disciplines, including sociology, history, political science, and 
anthropology to explore the region's historical development, its cultural 
diversity, and some of its critical social problems. Students do not have 
to speak or read any Spanish to take this course. This course fulfills the 
ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. 
Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours. 

SOCL 303. Family - A study of the social significance of the modern 
American family viewed in the perspective of its cultural heritage. 
Available to juniors and seniors. Offered even' term. Three semester 
hours. 

SOCL 312. Gender and Society - An examination of the social 
construction of gender and its consequences for individuals and 
societies. Topics include biological theories of gender differences, cross- 
cultural comparisons of gender expectations, childhood socialization, 
gender and the educational system, language and the media, gender and 
relationships, work and economic issues, and health issues. Offered 
spring term each year. Three semester hours. 



SOCL 314. Race and Ethnic Relations - A study of racial and cultural 
contacts and conflicts, including an analysis of prejudice and 
discrimination, status and participation of minority groups, and national 
and international aspects of minority problems. Prerequisite: SOCL 201. 
This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general 
education core. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours. 

SOCL 321. Sociology of Death, Dying, and Bereavement - An 

exploration of the current literature on death and dying. The approach 
is cross-cultural, even though the emphasis is on death and dying 
customs and practices in North America. Offered fall term alternate 
years. Three semester hours. 

SOCL 360. Aspects of Intercultural Studies - A study of inductive 
and theoretical analyses of the various challenges which result when 
differing cultural systems (e.g., family life, politics, economics, etc.) 
come into sustained contact, with special attention to (1) effective 
approaches to meeting the challenges, and (2) effective communicative 
strategies. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in 
the general education core. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester 
hours. 

SOCL 380. Principles of Social Work - An introduction to the 
profession of social work and an overview of the professional 
knowledge, skills, and values necessary for generalist social work 
practice. The student is introduced to the historical evolution of social 
work, the history of social welfare, the various fields of social work 
practice, and general systems theory. Offered fall term each year. Three 
semester hours. 

SOCL 381. Social Welfare Policies and Services - A study of social 
welfare policy, its theoretical orientations and philosophical 
underpinnings, as well as private and public social programs and issues 
which comprise the United States welfare system. Attention is given to 
those social policies/programs which have a major impact on generalist 
social work practice. Offered spring term each vear. Three semester 
hours. 

SOCL 401. Sociological Research - An introduction to the design of 
social research and methods of data collecting, analysis, and 
interpretation of social data. Prerequisite: SOCL 201 or permission of 
instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. 

SOCL 413. Seminar in Aging - An application of sociological 
principles, theories, and research findings to the understanding of the 
process of aging, the relationship of the aged to other segments of the 
population, and aging in other cultures. Topics include economic needs 
and resources of older people, issues of health and health care, work 
and retirement, psychological and physical changes, marriage and other 
relationships, and death and bereavement. Offered spring term alternate 
years. Three semester hours. 

SOCL 421. Sociology of Religion - A study of the dynamic 
relationships between religious and other social institutions with special 
attention to the contemporary American religious scene. Offered fall 
term even years. Three semester hours. Same as RELG 421 . 

SOCL 440. The Religions, Peoples, and Cultures of Africa - An 

introduction to the continent and peoples of Africa. Topics include 
African history, geography, religious life, cultural diversity, historical and 
current events on the African continent, and missions in Africa. This 
course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general 
education core. Same as RELG 440. Offered periodically. Three 
semester hours. 

SOCL 451. Sociological Theory - A broad survey of sociological 
thought from the earliest theorists in the nineteenth century to 
developments in the 21st century. Prerequisite: The prerequisite for 
sociology majors and traditional sociology minors is SOCL 201. 
Students pursuing the modified sociology minor for Bible majors with a 
missions emphasis may have SOCL 210 as their prerequisite for this 



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Spanish 139 



course. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

SOCL 461. Dynamics of Culture Change - A study of the 
identification of the processes of culture change, both internal and 
external, and critical study of theories offered to account for culture 
change. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours. 

SOCL 470. Health, Illness, and Health Care Systems - This course 
uses the sociological perspective to analyze illness and health, and to 
examine medical and health care systems. Topics include social and 
behavioral influences on illness, health-care funding issues, historical 
and contemporary issues in nurse-physician relationships, patients' 
rights issues, and health issues concerning specific groups such as rural 
people, minority group members, children and teenagers, the poor, the 
homeless, and women. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester 
hours. 

SOCL 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings 
which provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. TBA. One to three semester hours. 

SOCL 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences 
which provides for individualized study. To be arranged. One to three 
semester hours. 

SOCL 491. Field Work in Sociology - Supervised field work in 
various institutions and social service agencies including children's 
homes and after school care programs, homes for the aging, local 
agencies serving the poor and homeless, and work with other 
organizations providing assistance to persons in need. Students may 
develop other options, including international study opportunities, in 
collaboration with the instructor. Prerequisite: SOCL 201 and consent 
of the instructor. To be arranged. Three or six semester hours. 

SOCL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to 
semester. To be announced. One to three semester hours. 



Spanish 

Area of Humane Learning 

The Spanish program supports the following goals of Milligan College: 

■ Students will demonstrate sound scholarship through their ability 
to read and think analytically and critically, to communicate clearly 
and effectively, to evidence knowledge and competencies in the 
liberal arts. 

■ Students will gain an enriched quality of life through . . . 
appreciation for the arts . . . and preparation for graduate studies 
and a rewarding career or profession. 

The Spanish program emphasizes the four language skills of listening, 
speaking, reading, and writing. While the primary focus is on developing 
competency in communication, the secondary Spanish licensure 
program and the Spanish minor provide a foundation in the literature 
and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Graduates may pursue 
careers in teaching, in translating and interpreting (with additional 
study), in the tourism and hospitality industry, or in the diplomatic 
services. Spanish is a valuable asset in international business and in 
international agencies. In certain regions, Spanish is necessary for 
elementary and high school teachers of all subject areas and for social 
service careers. 



Secondary Spanish 
teacher licensure program 

SPAN 301 and 302 Advanced Conversation and Composition 

(6hrs) 
SPAN 311 Survey of Spanish Literature: Iberian and 312 and 

Survey of Spanish-American Literature (6 hrs) 
SPAN 401 Civilization and Culture of Spain and 402 Civilization 

and Culture of Latin America (6 hrs) 
ENGL 312 Introduction to Linguistics or a course in Advanced 

Spanish Grammar (3 hrs) 
HUMN 490 Reading and Research in Humane Learning (3 hrs) 



For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 



Spanish minor (18 hrs) 

1 8 hrs beyond the level of SPAN 111-112 

Some of these courses may need to be taken off Milligan's campus; 
cooperative opportunities are available. 



Course Descriptions 



SPAN 111-112. Elementary Spanish - A proficiency-oriented 
introductory course emphasizing oral communicative skills, including 
the essentials of grammar, practical vocabulary, and basic reading and 
writing skills within a cultural context. Three class periods and one 
laboratory period per week. SPAN 1 1 1 offered fall term each year; 
SPAN 112 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each 
semester. 

SPAN 211-212. Intermediate Spanish - A proficiency-oriented 
intermediate course consisting of a review of elementary skills and an 
integrated development of more complex listening, speaking, reading 
and writing skills. Cultural and literary readings serve as a basis for class 
discussion and written compositions. Three class periods and one 
laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 1 12 or equivalent. 
SPAN 21 1 offered fall term each year; SPAN 212 offered spring term 



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140 theatre arts 



each year. Three semester hours each semester. 

SPAN 301-302. Advanced Conversation and Composition - 

Intensive practice in the oral and written language with emphasis on 
vocabulary, syntax, and culture necessary for communication. Classes 
are conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 211 and 212 or 
equivalent. SPAN 301 and 302 offered periodically. Three semester 
hours each semester. 

SPAN 311. Survey of Spanish Literature: Iberian - An overview of 
the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages to the present. Selections 
from prominent authors of different periods and genres are read. 
Readings and discussions are in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 211 and 
212 or equivalent. Offered periodically. Three semester hours. 

SPAN 312. Survey of Spanish-American Literature - An overview of 
the literature of Latin America from the Colonial Period to the present. 
Selections from prominent authors of different periods, genres, and 
countries are read. Readings and discussions are in Spanish. 
Prerequisites: SPAN 21 1 and 212 or equivalent. Offered periodically. 
Three semester hours. 



Theatre Arts 

Area of Performing, Visual and Communicative Arts 

A student may declare a fine arts major with a theatre emphasis. For 
further information on this major, refer to the information under the 
listing of fine arts. 

The theatre arts minor fits well with numerous majors including but not 
limited to Bible, business administration, communications, English, 
history, humanities, and psychology. The study of theatre may serve to 
foster students' avocational interests as well as prepare them for more 
concentrated theatre studies in the future. 



Fine Arts major - B.A. (36 hrs) 

Theatre emphasis 

For more information about the fine arts major with theatre emphasis, 
see "Fine Arts." 



SPAN 401. Civilization and Culture of Spain - A study of Spanish 
civilization and culture from prehistoric times to the present. Topics 
include geography, history, political and social structures, culture, and 
the arts. Readings, class discussion, and reports are in Spanish. Offered 
periodically. Prerequisites: SPAN 21 1 and 212 or equivalent. Three 
semester hours. 

SPAN 402. Civilization and Culture of Latin America - A study of 
Latin American civilization and culture from the ancient Indian 
civilizations to the present. Topics include geography, history, political 
and social structures, culture, and the arts. Readings, class discussions, 
and reports are in Spanish. Offered periodically. This course fulfills the 
ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. 
Prerequisites: SPAN 21 1 and 212 or equivalent. Three semester hours. 

SPAN 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences 
which provides for study of material not included in the regular course 
offerings. Available on demand. One to three semester hours. 

SPAN 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas 
beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. 
Available on demand. One to three semester hours per semester. 



Teacher licensure for grades K-12 

Theatre 

Milligan College offers teacher licensure in theatre for grades K-12. 
Those interested in licensure to teach must take the following theatre 
and English courses: 

ENGL 411 Twentieth-Century Literature (3 hrs) 

OR 461 Jacobean Drama (3 hrs) 
ENGL 460 Elizabethan Drama 
MUSC 100 Applied Study - Voice (1 - 2 hrs) 
THEA 141 Fundamentals of Voice/Stage Movement (3 hrs) 
THEA 151 Introduction to Theatre (3 hrs) 
THEA 242 Fundamentals of Acting (3 hrs) 
THEA 340 Fundamentals of Directing (3 hrs) 
THEA 345 Theatre for Young Audiences (3 hrs) 
THEA 2520 Stagecraft (at ETSU) (3 hrs) 

For additional information about the teacher licensure program, 
including a list of courses required for licensure, see the Education: 
Licensure Programs section of the catalog. 

Theatre Arts minor (18 hrs) 

ENGL 460 Elizabethan Drama or 461 Jacobean Drama (3 hrs) 

MUSC 100 Applied Study - Voice for two semesters 

THEA 141 Fundamentals of Voice/Stage Movement (3 hrs) 

THEA 151 Introduction to Theatre (3 hrs) 

THEA 242 Fundamentals of Acting (3 hrs) 

THEA 340 Fundamentals of Directing (3 hrs) 

Elective hour in theatre arts 

HPXS 108 may also apply toward the minor 



Course Descriptions 

THEA 141. Fundamentals of Voice/Stage Movement - A survey 
course introducing the student to major vocal production and stage 
movement theorists as well as the LeCoq-based mask work and an 
introduction to stage dialects and stage combat. Offered spring term 
odd years. Three semester hours. 

THEA 151. Introduction to Theatre - The history and literature of 
the theatre from its Greek origins to the present. This course is 
designed to help the student relate drama in its historical context to 
contemporary man. Some emphasis is placed on films, dance, and 
musical theatre. The course is supplemented by films, attendance at area 
performances, and production work on the current semester's drama 
production. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours. 



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worship leadership 141 



THEA 242. Fundamentals of Acting - A study of techniques in 
acting. Class exercises are designed to develop relaxation, concentration, 
and improvisation skills. Audition techniques, monologue studies, and 
scene study are also emphasized. Laboratory experience includes 
participating in some facet of the current semester's drama production. 
Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours. 

THEA 256. Theatre Practicum - An opportunity to gain experience 
in practical theatre work: acting, technical work, or directing. This 
course may be taken multiple times for up to 6 hours of credit. Offered 
every term. One to two semester hours. 

THEA 340. Fundamentals of Directing - A course emphasizing 
study of the various elements in the production of a play or a short film: 
theory, selection of play or screenplay, production, interpretation of the 
play or film, scene design, costumes, and make-up. The course 
culminates in the direction of a one-act play or short film for the public. 
This course is especially recommended for students preparing to 
supervise play or film production in the public schools. Prerequisites for 
film studies majors: COMM 270 and 323. Offered spring term even 
years. Three semester hours. 

THEA 345. Theatre for Young Audiences - An opportunity to gain 
experience in practical theatre work: touring, costuming, lighting, 
producing, and directing. Approval of instructor is required. Offered 
every term. One to three semester hours. 

THEA 470. Dramatic Literature and Criticism - A concentrated 
program of readings from 20 th and 21 st century playwrights which will 
serve to introduce the student to important dramatists. Offered fall 
term odd years. Three semester hours. 

THEA 490. Theatre Performance Recital/Portfolio - A capstone 
course for theatre emphasis majors in the fine arts. An individualized 
course of studv to be determined by the student and an advisory 
committee. Performance students may do this in the form of an acting 
recital or final directing or playwriting project, while design oriented 
students may elect to do comprehensive work on preparing their design 
portfolio. Seniors only. Approval of chair is required. Three semester 
hours. 

THEA 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth 
discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in 
the regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. To 
be announced. One to three semester hours. 



Worship Leadership 

Area of Biblical Learning 

Few ministry roles have such an immediate impact on churches today as 
the Worship Leader. Milligan College seeks to prepare people for such 
leadership through a combination of biblical studies, historical 
awareness, general ministry preparation, and artistic skills. We believe 
that leading worship of God through Jesus Christ demands the best of 
knowledge and ability, but also the spiritual depth and integrity to help 
others worship "in spirit and truth." Consequendy, this major is a 
combination of portions of the Bible major and of music and fine arts. 
Students are encouraged to take more of the classes in either discipline 
for additional benefit, but the combination in the requirements for this 
major will provide a good starting point and sufficient tools to build a 
solid and lasting ministry. 

This major clearly supports the mission of the college in that it prepares 
students to "honor God through servant-leadership." It does that 
through aiming direcdy toward several of the objectives: it is based on 
developing and strengthening "a Positive, Personal Christian Faith that 
Jesus is Lord and Savior"; it strongly emphasizes "A Commitment to 
Follow the Teachings of the Christian Scripture" through every facet of 
both ministry role and personal life; it urges the students by leadership 
in the local church to "Recognize and Assume Responsibility in 
Society"; it promotes "Sound Scholarship" through the combination of 
disciplines of study and improvement of skills; it equips students for a 
professional career through a Christian vocation, thereby preparing 
people to "Secure an Enriched Quality of Life"; and it leads toward a 
"Healthy Lifestyle" by full participation in the active life of a local 
church and by using God-given talents direcdy in His service. 

Worship leadership prepares a student to participate in the ministry staff 
of a local church and lead Christian people in worship that is scripturally 
sound and musically or artistically competent. By building on the basic 
education received in this Milligan degree program, a student can 
appropriately develop the worship and musical or artistic strengths of a 
church and personally function in other ministry roles if needed or 
desired. The liberal arts foundation and the cross-emphasis in ministry 
focus provide an excellent platform on which to stand and lead, or to 
continue to build more specialized leadership. 

Milligan College expects those who graduate with a worship leadership 
major to (1) be equipped to lead worship in a way that conveys the 
fullness of mind and spirit before God - communicating with and for 
the current culture but still retaining the strength of scriptural faith and 
Christian history; (2) be prepared for service in a leadership role of 
ministry in the church and be able to function as a part of a team/staff 
relationship; (3) be able to understand, work with, and lead others in 
expressions of worship through musical, dramatic, and/or visual arts; 
(4) be equipped to pursue seminar)' or graduate education with a good 
preparation for that advanced study; and (5) provide a good Christian 
example as a student of scripture and disciple of Jesus. Emphases of 
spiritual dependence upon God, solid academic study, including serious 
study of the Bible itself, and practices of both integrity and effectiveness 
highlight this program of study. 

The Worship Leadership major consists of four clusters of courses in 
Bible, history, Christian ministry, and worship (see course requirements 
below). 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



142 worship ministry 



Worship Leadership major - B.A. 
(39 hrs) 



BIBL 201 Jesus in the Gospels (3 hrs) 

B1BL 21 1 Old Testament Images of God (3 hrs) 

HIST 341 and 342 Church History (6 hrs) 

CMIN 250-253 Practical Ministries Colloquium A - D (2 hrs) 

CMIN 273 Introduction to Ministry (3 hrs) 

CMIN 365 Christian Worship (3 hrs) 

CMIN 491 Practicum in Ministry (2 hrs) 

MUSC 141 Basic Music Reading Skills OR 143 Basic Music 

Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
MUSC 454 Music Ministry Methods (3 hrs) 
Applied study in music (2 hrs) 
Participation in three semesters of music ensembles 

(l 1 / 2 to4'/ 2 hrs) 
THEA 242 Fundamentals of Acting, 340 Fundamentals of 

Directing, OR 345 Theatre for Young Audiences (3 hrs) 

Additional electives pertinent to the student's interests and vocational 
objectives, sufficient to reach a minimum of thirty-nine hours, are to be 
selected in consultation with the student's faculty adviser. 

The Worship Leadership major at Milligan leads to the BA. degree, 
which requires intermediate proficiency in a foreign language. Language 
proficiency satisfies a general education requirement, not a requirement 
of the Worship Leadership major. For further ministerial or biblical 
studies, Greek is strongly recommended for the best study of the Bible. 

Milligan offers two minors which are related to this major — the 
Worship Ministry minor and the Music Ministry minor. For more 
information about these minors, see "Worship Ministry" or "Music 
Ministry." 



Worship Ministry 

Area of Biblical Learning 

In addition to majors in Bible and Worship Leadership, Milligan College 
offers a minor in Worship Mnistry. This minor focuses primarily on the 
theological aspects of worship more than on the practical or technical 
elements. For worship to be both effective and faithful, it needs 
scriptural and historical depth and reflection, which are the emphases of 
this minor 

The Worship Ministry minor supports the Mission of the College by 
strongly emphasizing "A Positive, Personal Faith That Jesus is Lord and 
Savior" and encouraging students to learn and practice servant- 
leadership in the process of leading others in worship. Because worship 
should and does affect all of life, this minor helps develop and practice 
"A Commitment to Follow the Teachings of the Christian Scripture in 
One's Personal and Social Ethics" and "The Capacity to Recognize and 
Assume Responsibility in Society." And as a holistic view of life 
recognizes our need for worship, this course of study helps with 
"Participation in the Activities of a Healthy Lifestyle." 

Worship reflects the core of Christian faith, and most churches see the 
need to make their worship the best it can be. Churches need people, 
therefore, who understand both the scriptural and historical significance 
of what is done and said in times of worship. As important as good 
skills and talents are in presenting public programs, the greater need is 
to know why we do what we do and what we are expressing in the 
process. This calls for biblical and historical awareness in order to 
respond faithfully to God's call to us as revealed in scripture and to 
present what best expresses Christian conviction as experienced in the 
Church for centuries. Staying contemporary in worship is a must for 
people of each generation to participate meaningfully, but that serves its 
purpose best when it is connected rightly to both scripture and 
tradition. This minor seeks to equip students to help in that endeavor, 
whether as a supplement to another major of focused Christian 
leadership or as a bi-vocational church leader. 



Worship Ministry minor (21 - 22 hrs) 

BIBL 201 Jesus in the Gospels (3 hrs) 

BIBL 21 1 Old Testament Images of God (3 hrs) 

BIBL elective (3 hrs) 

CMIN 365 Christian Worship (3 hrs) 

HIST 275 Selected Topics in the History of the Reformation of 

the Nineteenth Century (1 hr) 
HIST 341 and 342 Church History (6 hrs) 

Two to three hours from the following: 

MUSC 141 Basic Music Reading Skills (3 hrs) 
MUSC 143 Basic Music Theory/Ear Training (3 hrs) 
Applied study in music 
Participation in ensembles 

THEA 242 Fundamentals of Acting, 340 Fundamentals of 
Directing, OR 345 Theatre for Young Audiences (3 hrs) 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



youth ministry 143 



Youth Ministry 

Area of Biblical Learning 

As a part of "changing lives and shaping culture," youth ministry is one 
of the most strategic opportunities to make an impact on people and 
the world. Beginning with "A Positive, Personal Faith that Jesus is Lord 
and Savior" this major emphasis supports and implements "A 
Commitment to Follow the Teachings of the Christian Scripture in 
One's Personal and Social Ethics." Because the youth of today are so 
important now and will be the unquestioned leaders of tomorrow, 
youth ministry emphasizes the "Capacity to Recognize and Assume 
Responsibility in Society." Classes focusing on biblical and historical 
foundations promote "The Knowledge, Meaning, and Application of 
Sound Scholarship" as do all the others that comprise this major, and, 
because of the attention given to youth, there is considerable emphasis 
on "Participation in the Activities of a Healthy Lifestyle." Youth 
ministry fits well into the overall purpose and mission of Milligan 
College, and the College provides excellent preparation for serving Jesus 
Christ through ministry to youth. 

The youth ministry track in the Bible major prepares people to lead in 
ministering to and with young people, and that may include those from 
early childhood up through early adulthood. Both youth ministers and 
children's ministers will find this major effective in basic preparation for 
service, as will campus ministers, workers with various parachurch 
ministries such as camps, youth organizations, evangelism efforts and 
many more. Because of the strong foundation incorporated into this 
emphasis, people will have basic preparation to move into other areas 
of ministry from a traditional role. 

Milligan College expects those who graduate with a Bible major in a 
youth ministry track to (1) be equipped to stay abreast of current 
changes in youth culture and communicate effectively through all those 
changes; (2) be prepared for service in a leadership role of ministry in 
the church and able to function as part of a team/staff relationship; (3) 
have a good foundation in biblical, church historical, and practical 
studies in order to prepare and deliver sound teaching to youth and to 
continue in lifelong learning; (4) be equipped to pursue seminary or 
graduate education with a good preparation for that advanced study; 
and (5) provide a good Christian example as a student of scripture. 
Emphases of spiritual dependence upon God, solid academic study, 
including serious study of the Bible itself, and practices of both integrity 
and effectiveness highlight this program of study. 

Bible major - B.A. (38-39 hrs) 

Youth ministry track 

For information about the Bible major with the youth ministry track, 
see "Bible." 

Youth Ministry minor (18 hrs) 

BIBL 201 Jesus in the Gospels (3 hrs) 

BIBL 21 1 Old Testament Images of God (3 hrs) 

HIST 275 Selected Topics in the History of the Reformation of 

the Nineteenth Century (1 hr) 
HIST 341 and 342 Church History (6 hrs) 

CMIN 217 Foundation for Youth and Children's Ministry (3 hrs) 
CMIN 318 Materials and Methods of Youth Ministries (2 hrs) 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



144 board of trustees, advisors 



The Milligan 
Community 



We distinguish those who hold some form of membership in the College as the 
"Milligan Community. "Membership consists of six classifications: trustees, advisors, 
faculty, staff, students, and alumni. The term "Community" thus refers not to a 
geographic or social locality but rather to persons sustaining a relationship to one 
another through their membership in the College. These persons are held together by a 
common heritage, by common ideals, and by commitment to a common ultimate goal. 
Experience set in such a community is productive of a common spirit, a deep 
affection, a mutual trust, and an enthusiasm in discharging the responsibilities and 
enjoying the rewards incident to membership in the College. 

Board of Trustees 

Charles E. Allen, M.D., Retired Physician, Johnson City, TN 

Dennis Bratton, Minister, Jacksonville, FL 

Thomas J. Burleson, Building Contractor, Johnson City, TN 

William Clem, Businessman, Lexington, KY 

Tammy W. Eldridge, Businesswoman, Jonesborough, TN 

James Frasure, Retired Physician, Bloomington, IN 

Dennis Fulk, Businessman, CarmeL IN 

Brenda Green, Church woman, Elizabethton, TN 

James Green, Attorney, Bristol, VA 

Patricia Green, Businesswoman, Elizabethton, TN 

William B. Greene, Jr., Banker, Elizabethton, TN 

David W. Hamilton, Businessman, Jacksonville, FL 

David O. Hamlin, Minister, Shelbyville, KY 

Marshall Havden, Minister, Columbus, OH 

Danny Johnson, Minister, Johnson City, TN 

Greg )ohnson, Minister, Tarpon Springs, FL 

Scott Kent, Businessman, Libertyville, IL 

LeRoy Lawson, Retired Educator, Payson, AZ 

Daniel W. McMahan, Businessman, Louisville, KY 

Kenneth W. Oosting, Businessman, Oronogo, MO 

Cameron Pern', Retired Bank Executive, Johnson City, TN 

Gary Porter, Executive Director, Christian Children's Home of Ohio, 

Wooster, OH 
Bill Rhoades, Businessman, Gulf Shores, AL 
James R. Rice, M. D., Retired Psychiatrist, Irmo, SC 
JoAnn Richardson, Businesswoman, Havre de Grace, MD 
Rick Rusaw, Minister, Longmont, CO 
J. Donald Sams, Exec. Director, Christian Benevolent Association, 

Middletown, OH 
Marvin Swiney, Educator, Grundy, VA 
Mark H. Webb, Dentist, Bristol, TN 
Glen Williams, Judge, Abingdon, VA 
Ron Zimmerman, Businessman, Indianapolis, IN 

Non-voting 

Simon J. Dahlman (Faculty), Milligan College, TN (2007) 
Susan Higgins (Faculty), Milligan College, TN (2007) 

Trustees emeritus 

Russell F. Blowers, Minister, Indianapolis, IN 

Horace W. Dabney, Retired Businessman, Louisville, KY 

W. Edward Fine, Minister, Johnson City, TN 

Omer Hamlin, Jr., Retired College Administrator, Lexington, KY 

Donald B. Marshall, Minister, Elizabethton, TN 

Jeanne Starkey, Church woman, Zionsville, IN 



Board of Advisors 

Advisors, who are drawn from contributing churches, serve as advocates for the 
College and liaisons behveen Milligan College and the supporting churches. Advisors 
regularly attend College Board meetings, are active members of Board committees, 
and may make recommendations to the Board of Trustees. 

Jackie Acker, Retired Educator, Akron, OH 

Michael Alread, Businessman, Johnson City, TN 

Margaret Fugate-Anderson, Attorney, Johnson City, TN 

Tom Banks, Attorney, Elizabethton, TN 

Carol Barker, Retired Educator, Belcamp, MD 

Philip Blowers, Attorney, Indianapolis, IN 

Darla Bowes, Churchwoman, Lock Haven, PA 

Gerry Brooks, Minister, Lexington, KY 

Perry Carroll, Educator, King, NC 

Brian P. Clark, Businessman, Lexington, KY 

Samuel H. Clark, Jr., Retired, Bristol, TN 

Alvin Covell, Minister, Frankton, IN 

Lee Cox, Minister, Columbus, OH 

E. Richard Crabtree, Minister, Colorado Springs, CO 

Dennis Dove, Businessman, Shelbyville, KY 

Ronald Dove, Jr., Attorney, Derwood, MD 

Scott W. French, Businessman, Fredrick, MD 

Linda Gibbons, Churchwoman, Western Springs, IL 

|ack Gilbert, Executive, Indianapolis, IN 

Mignon Holben, Churchwoman, Gray, TN 

Clint Holloway, Minister, Nashville, TN 

Brad Hopton, Businessman, Madison, NJ 

Anne Hughes, Musician, Dickinson, TX 

David C. Hughston, Insurance Executive, Brownsville, TX 

Rob Kastens, Minister, Joppa, MD 

Bnan Leslie, Youth Minister, Plainfield, IN 

Karl M. Marshall, Minister, Paris, IL 

Kathleen G. Mclnturff, Educator, Jonesborough, TN 

Mark Miller, Businessman, Lake Worth, FL 

David Mize, Associate Minister, Ironton, OH 

B.J. Moore, Businessman, Greeneville, TN 

Ed B. Notestine, Educator, East Point, GA 

Steve Poston, Associate Minister, Louisville, KY 

Rick Raines, Minister, Mechanicsville, VA 

Ken Richardson, Businessman, Clayton, IN 

John Russell, Minister, Ft. Mitchell, KY 

John C. Samples, Ministry, Fishers, IN 

James D. Saunders, Minister, Gray, TN 

Ralph Sims, Retired Minister, Johnson City, TN 

Ted Smith, Businessman, Indianapolis, IN 

Ron Sports, Businessman, Beech Creek, PA 

Pat Stuart, Educator, Jacksonville, FL 

Max Stacker, Retired C.P.A., Hinsdale, IL 

Bill Wash, Businessman, Danville, IN 

R. Mark Webb, Businessman, Ft. Myers, FL 

Glynn Wells, M.D., Physician, Abingdon, MD 

Jerry Williams, Minister, Indianapolis, IN 

Robert L. Williams, Educator, Linden, PA 

Brian Woodward, Associate Minister, Springfield, VA 

Bill R Worrell, Minister, Knightstown, IN 

Marie Wright, Educator, Frankfort, KY 



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administration 145 



Administration 

Office of the President 

President Donald R. Jeanes, D.D. 

Administrative Assistant Kathy Barnes, B.S. 

Chancellor Marshall J. Leggett, D.D. 
Director of Institutional Research and Effectiveness Sue H. Skidmore, MA. 

Director of the Institute for Servant Leadership Elizabeth J. Anderson, MA. 
Program Associate to the ISL 



Service Manager - Landscaping/ Grounds 
Secretary 



Kevin Hurley, B.A. 
Sandy Deyton 



Academic Affairs 

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean 

Administrative Assistant 

Associate Dean and Registrar 

Associate Registrar 

Assistant Registrar 

Office Manager 

Chair of Biblical Learning 

Chair of Humane Learning 

Director of Humanities 

Director of Writing 

Chair of Performing, Visual, Communicative Arts 

Secretary (Music/Communications /Theatre) 

Chair of Business 

Director of the M.B.A. 

Office Manager 

Chair of Education 

Coordinator of Field Experience 

Director of Teacher Certification 

Office Manager (Teacher Education) 

Secretary (Teacher Education) 

Secretary (Faculty Office Building) 

Secretary (HPXS) 

Chair and Director of Nursing 

Secretary 

Chair and Director of Occupational Therapy 

Fieldwork Coordinator 

Chair of Scientific Learning 

Secretary 

Chair of Social Learning 

Director of Academic Advising 

Director of Lifelong Learning 

Office Manager 

Computer Network Manager 

Information Technology Manager 



Mark A. Matson, Ph.D. 

Taris S. Whitson, B.S. 

Sue H. Skidmore, MA. 

Stacy R. Tramel, M.S.W. 

Cindy Wymer, M.S. 

Carrie Shaw, B.S. 

Philip D. Kenneson, Ph.D. 

Jack L. Knowles, Ph.D. 

Craig S. Farmer, Ph.D. 

Heather Hoover, M.A. 

C. Richard Major, M.F.A. 

Rita Myers 

John C. Keyt, D.B.A. 

John C. Keyt, D.B.A. 

Rebecca Burgner, B.S. 

Lyn C. Howell, Ph.D. 

Donald R. Schmalzried, Ed.D. 

Beverly L. Schmalzried, Ph.D. 

Karen Hill, B.A. 

Karen Voke 

Tammy Whitehead, B.S. 

Ginger Dillon, M.A.L.S. 

Melinda K. Collins, Ph.D. 

Linda Tipton 

Jeff Snodgrass, Ph.D. 

Christy M. Fellers, M.S.O.T. 

Diane E. Junker, Ph.D. 

Linda Sweeney 

Susan G. Higgins, Ph.D. 

John Paul Abner, Ph.D. 

Milton Carter, MA. 

Rhonda L. Taylor 

Chris Haskins, B.A. 

Mark Nester 

Tracee Johnson, B.S. 



IT Assistant Manager and Database Administrator 
Information Technology and Communications Technician Curtis Huskins 
Director of Developmental Studies Program Traci Smith, M.T.S. 

Director of Library Services Gary F. Daught, MA.-I.RL.S. 

Archivist and Technical Services Specialist Ginger Dillon, M.A.L.S. 

Office Manager Jan Ricker 

Reference and Instruction Librarian G. Mary Jackson, M.L.S. 

Technical Services Manager June Leonard 

Director of Testing Cindy Wymer, M.S. 



Business and Finance 

Vice President for Business 

Vice President for Finance 

Administrative Assistant 

Accounts Payable Clerk and Mailroom 

Bookstore Manager 

Coordinator of Financial Aid 

Technical Specialist 

Student Financial Counselors 



Director of Personnel and Work Study 

Cashier 

Switchboard Receptionist 

Service Manager - Facilities 

Service Manager - Housekeeping 



Joe G. Whitaker, B.S., C.P.A. 

Jacqui Steadman, B.B.A., C.P.A. 

Carolyn Gentry 

Supervisor Sharon Pridemore 

Jack Presnell 

Diane L. Keasling, B.S. 

Debbie Street 

Gloria Daniels 

Sharon Greatti 

Elaine Knowlton 

Coordinator Linda H. Lawson, B.A. 

Judy McNeil 

Lisa Bowman, B.B.A. 

Jonathan Robinson, B.S. 

Theresa McCrary 



Enrollment Management and Marketing Communications 

Vice President for Enrollment Management and 

Marketing Communications A. Lee Fierbaugh, MA. 

Director of Enrollment Management Tracy Brinn, M.A. 

Graduate and Adult Admissions Specialists Milton Carter, M.A. 

Tausha Clay, Ed.D. 

Courtney Kieslich, B.S. 

Christy Isbell, Ph.D. 

Jan E. Loveday, MAT. 

Claire Marr, B.A. 

Nathaniel Moultrie, M.A. 

Traci Smith, M.T.S. 

Phyllis Fox, B.S. 

Jennifer Greenwell, B.S. 

Kenny Laughters, B.A. 

Bart Price, BA. 

Steffani L. Taylor, B.S. 



M.S.O.T. Admissions Liaison 
Director of Diversity Services 
Director of Student Success 
Director of Youth in Ministry 7 
Admissions Counselors 



Call Center Manager 
Campus Visits Coordinator 
Admissions Office Manager 
Admissions Office Secretary 
Director of Public Relations 
Creative Services Coordinator 
Sports Information Coordinator 

Institutional Advancement 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement 

Assistant to the President 

Assistant to the President & Director of Major Gifts 

Assistant to the President 

Assistant to the President for Church Relations Euj 

Director of Alumni Relations 

Director of Development and Church Relations 

Assistant for Gift Management 

Scholarship Program Coordinator 



Aimee Miller, B.M. 

Betty M. Carter 

Ellie Patterson, B.A. 

Chandrea Shell, B.S. 

Jessica Stout, B.S. 

Peter Dalton, B.S. 



William B. Greer, Ph.D. 

Robert P. Young, M.A. 

jack A. Simpson, B.S. 

Kevin Harkey, M.A. 

;ene H. Wigginton, D.D. 

Theresa M. Garbe, B.A. 

Joseph C. Wise, B.S. 

Shirley Brookshire 

Tammy Whitehead, B.S. 



Student Development 

Vice President for Student Development 

Administrative Assistant 

Campus Minister 

Director of Athletics 

Baseball Coach 

Director of Intramurals 

Basketball Coach (Men) and Golf Coach 

Basketball Coach (Women) 

Cheerleading Coach 

Cross Country and Track Coach (Men and W 

Soccer Coach (Men and Women) 

Softball Coach 

Swimming Coach 

Tennis Coach (Men and Women) 

Volleyball Coach 

Assistant Soccer Coach 

Director for Calling and Career Exploration 

Director of Disability Services 

Director of Residence Life and Housing 

Resident Directors 



Apartment Manager 
Health Clinic Nurse 
Yearbook Faculty Advisor 
Director of Campus Activities 



Mark Fox, M.B.A. 
Ann Easter 
Nathan Flora, M.Div. 
Ray Smith, B.S. 
Nathan Meade, B.S. 
Ron Worrell, B.A. 
Tony Wallingford, M.A. 
Rich Aubrey, Ed.D. 
Ronda Paulson, M.Ed, 
omen) Chris Layne, B.S. 

David Dixon, B.S. 
Wes Holly 
Ron Goehring, B.S. 
Ron Worrell, BA. 
Kim Deaton Hyatt, M.A.Ed. 
Lisa Buckley, M.A. 
Elizabeth J. Anderson, M.A. 
Traci Smith, M.T.S. 
Shauna Nefos, B.S. 
Jess Carter, B.S. 
Adam Kneisley, J.D. 
Abby Oti, BA. 
Ryan Starr, M.Div. 
Travis Weeks, B.A. 
Vicki Carroll, A.S. 
Simon ]. Dahlman, M.A. 
less Carter, B.S. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



146 faculty 



Regular Ranked Faculty 



John Paul Abner, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy and Psychology 

(1999), B.A., Middle Tennessee State University; M.S. and Ph.D., 

University of" Florida. 
Bertram S. Allen, Jr., Professor of Psychology (1979), B.A., Milligan College; 

M.Ed, and Ed.D., Lehigh University; University of Maryland. 
M. Alice Anthony, Associate Professor of Art (1991), B.S., The University of 

Memphis; M.F.A., East Tennessee State University. 
Rubye W. heck, Associate Professor of Sociology (1994), B.A., Lambuth 

College; M.A., Memphis State University; Ph.D., University of 

Florida. 
Nicholas D. Blosser, Assistant Professor of Art (1991), B.F.A. and M.F.A., 

The Ohio State University. 
J. Curtis Booher, Assistant Professor of Christian Ministries (2006), B.A., 

Milligan College; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion. 
TedW. Booth, Visiting Professor of Humanities and History (2007), B.A., 

Milligan College; M.S.S.W., The University of Tennessee, 

Knoxville; M.A.R., Emmanuel School of Religion; Ph.D. 

Candidate, The University of Tennessee, Knox 
Helen M. Bowman, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Education (2003), B.S. 

and M.A., East Tennessee State University. 
Harold H. Branstrator, Assistant Professor of Business Administration (2007), 

B.S., California State University, San Bernadino; M.B.A., University 

of Redlands; Ph.D. Candidate, Capella University. 
Kellie D. Brown, Associate Professor of Music (1998), B.M.E. and Ed.D., East 

Tennessee State University; M.M., Appalachian State University; 

Furman University; University of Virginia. 
David A. Campbell, Assistant Professor of Economics (2007), B.S., James 

Madison University; M.A. and Ph.D., George Mason University. 
Carolyn W. Carter, Professor of Computer Information Systems and Business 

Administration (1984), B.S. and M.A., East Tennessee State 

University; M.S.C.S.E., University of Evansville; Ph.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and State University. 
Teresa A. Carter, Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems (2005), 

B.S., Milligan College; M.S., University of Phoenix. 
Tausha L. Clay, Assistant Professor of Education (2005), B.S. , M.Ed., and 

Ed.D., East Tennessee State University. 
Melinda K Collins, The Mountain States Health Alliance Chair of Nursing and 

Associate Professor of Nursing (1994), M.S.N., Vanderbilt University; 

Ph.D., The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; East Tennessee 

State University. 
Ruth McDowell Cook, Professor of English and Humanities (1998), B.A., 

Trevecca Nazarene University; M.A., Eastern Illinois University; 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina; University of Central 

Arkansas; Bowling Green State University; Clemson University. 
Tracey Cook Crowe, Assistant Professor of Education (2006), B.S., M.Ed., and 

Ed.D., East Tennessee State University. 
Simon J. Dahlman, Associate Professor of Communications (1999), B.A., 

Milligan College; M.A., University of Cincinnati; Emmanuel 

School of Religion; Springdale College, Birmingham, England; 

London School of Journalism. 
Timothy L. Dillon, The Henry and Emerald Webb Chair of History and Professor 

of History and Humanities (1982), B.A., Milligan College; M.A. and 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Emmanuel School of 

Religion. 
Linda L. Doan, Professor of Human Performance and Exercise Science (1983), 

B.A., Wittenberg University; M.Ed., Xavier University; Ed.D., East 

Tennessee State University. 
Joy R Drinnon, Associate Professor of Psychology (1999), B.S., East Tennessee 

State University; M.A. and Ph.D., The University of Tennessee, 

Knoxville. 
Anne B. Elliott, Assistant Professor of Music (2007), B.A., Coastal Carolina 

College; M.C.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; East 

Tennessee State University. 
Maty M. Fabick, Associate Professor of Nursing (1996), B.S.N. , Southwest 

Missouri State University; M.Ed., Drury College; M.S.N. , 

BeUarmine College; East Tennessee State University. 
Craig S. Farmer, The Joel 0. and Mabel Stephens Chair of Bible and Associate 

Professor of History and Humanities (1993), B.A., Haverford College; 



M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Duke University; Universitat 

Augsburg. 
Christy M. Fellers, Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy (2005), B.S. and 

M.S.O.T., Milligan College. 
Marvin E. Glover, Jr., Associate Professor of Mathematics (1990), B.S., Athens 

State College; M.S., Vanderbilt University. 
Donald W. Good, Professor of Education and Mathematics (2007), B.S., 

Western Carolina University; MAT., Winthrop College; Ed.D., 

University of South Carolina, Columbia; Columbia Bible College. 
Teresa A. Heaton, Assistant Professor of Nursing (2005), B.S.N, and M.P.H., 

East Tennessee State University. 
Susan Gayle Higgins, Professor of Sociology (1977), B.A., Lincoln Christian 

College; M.A. and Ph.D., Indiana University. 
Heather M. Hoover, Assistant Professor of Humanities and Director of Writing 

(2007), B.A., Milligan College; M.A., East Tennessee State 

University; Dartmouth College; The University of Tennessee, 

Knoxville. 
Charles M. Horvath, Assistant Professor of Business Administration (2003), B.S. 

and M.B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.Div., Gordon- 

Conwell Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 

Massachusetts. 
Lyn C. Howell, Associate Professor of Education (2001), B.A., Marshall 

University; M.S., University of La Verne; M.Ed., Georgia 

Southwestern; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. 
Kimberly D. Hyatt, Assistant Professor of Human Performance and Exercise 

Science (2002), B.S., Milligan College; M.A.Ed., Tusculum College; 

Tennessee Technological University. 
Christy Isbell, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy (1998), B.S. and 

M.H.S., Medical University of South Carolina; Ph.D., The 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 
John R Jackson, Assistant Professor of Bible and Humanities (2005), B.A. and 

M.Div., Abilene Christian University; S.T.M., Drew University; 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Diane E. Junker, Professor of Chemistry and Nursing (1984-88; 1992), B.S. 

and B.S.N. , Milligan College; M.S.N., The University of Tennessee, 

Knoxville; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
Patrick N. Kariuki, Associate Professor of Education (1995), B.A., Lee 

College; M.A. and Ed.D., East Tennessee State University. 
Karen L. Kelly, Professor of Biology and Occupational Therapy (1993), B.S., 

Milligan College; Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles. 
Philip D. Kenneson, The Kenneth E. Starkey Chair of Bible and Christian 

Ministries and Professor of Theology and Philosophy (1992), B.A., Buder 

University; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion; Ph.D., Duke 

University. 
John C Keyt, Professor of Marketing and Business Administration (2004), B.S. 

and M.B.A., East Tennessee State University; D.B.A., The 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville; University of Virginia. 
Phyllis A. King Associate Professor of Nursing (1995), B.S.N., East 

Tennessee State University; M.S.N, and Ph.D., The University of 

Tennessee, Knoxville. 
Jack L, Knowles, The George and Janet Arnold Chair of Humanities and Professor 

of English (1970), B.A., Milligan College; M.A. and Ph.D., The 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville; The Ohio State University; 

University of Oxford. 
Gary L Leek, Associate Professor of Biology (1998), B.S., University of 

Mssouri; M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., Michigan State 

University. 
Richard D. Lara, Professor of Chemistry (1971-1985, 1988), B.S., University 

of Wisconsin-Madison; Ph.D., Iowa State University; Medical 

College of Virginia. 
/. Lee Magness, The Vera Britton Chair of Bible and Professor of Bible (1983), 

B.A., Milligan College; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion; 

Ph.D., Emory University; Vanderbilt University. 
Patricia P. Magness, Professor of Humanities (1984), B.A., Milligan College; 

M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Emory University; Boise State 

University; Georgia State University. 
Robert L Mahan, Jr., Associate Professor of Accounting (1988), B.B.A., Grand 

Valley State College; M.Acc, University of Georgia; Argosy 

University; Certified Public Accountant. 



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faculty 147 



C. 'Richard Major, Professor of Theatre (1985), B.A., Milligan College; 

M.F.A., Michigan State University; Ohio University. 
Mark A. Matson, "Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean and Associate 

Professor of Bible (1985-1990, 1999), B.S., California State University, 

Humboldt; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion; Ph.D., Duke 

University; University of California, San Diego; Fuller Theological 

Seminary; Shasta Bible College. 
Jeffrey D. Miller, Associate Professor of Bible (1999), B.Th. and B.A., 

Nebraska Christian College; M.Div., Emmanuel School of 

Religion; Ph.D., Iliff School of Theology and The University of 

Denver. 
LoriL. Mills, Associate Professor ofPsycholog) (1993-1999, 2000), B.A., 

Milligan College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Louisville. 
K. Bruce Montgomery, Associate Professor of Communications (1995), B.S.L., 

Minnesota Bible College; M.Div., Christian Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D., Bowling Green State University. 
Norma]. Morrison, Professor of Education (1982), A.A., Indian River Junior 

College; B.A., Florida State University; MAT. and Ed.D., East 

Tennessee State University; Milligan College; University of 

Oregon. 
Isaac L Nidiffer, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Mathematics (1995), B.S. 

and M.S., East Tennessee State University. 
Mark W. Peacock, Associate Professor oj "Legal Studies (1998), B.S., Eastern 

Illinois University; J.D., Northern Illinois University College of 

Law; Emmanuel School of Religion. 
David A. Roberts, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Physics (1976), B.A., 

Bloomsburg State College; M.S., George Washington State 

University; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion. 
David C. Runner, Professor of Music (1972), B.M., Boise State University; 

M.M. and D.M.A., Eastman School of Music; University of 

Rochester. 
Josie Ryan, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (2004), B.A., Milligan College; 

M.A., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., University of South 

Carolina. 
Tammy R. Samples, Assistant Professor of Nursing (2005), B.S.N, and M.S.N., 

East Tennessee State University. 
Beverly L Schmal^ried, Professor of Education (2003), B.S., Fort Hays State 

University; M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., Florida State 

University. 
Donald R. Schmal^ried, Professor of the Practice of Education (2003), B.S., Fort 

Hays Kansas State College; M.S., Kansas State College of 

Pittsburgh; Ed.D., Oklahoma State University. 
Rick L. Simerly, Associate Professor of Music (2001), B.S. and M.A., East 

Tennessee State University. 
John C. Simonsen, Associate Professor of Human Performance and Exercise Science 

(1999), B.A., Furman University; M.B.A., Clemson 

University/ Furman University; M.S., Texas Tech University; 

Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Reformed Theological 

Seminary. 
Victoria L. Sitter, Associate Professor of Business Administration (1995), B.A., 

East Tennessee State University; M.S., The University of 

Tennessee, Knoxville; Ph.D., Regent University. 
Jill Smith, Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy (2004), B.S., Central 

Michigan University; M.S.O.T., Western Michigan University; 

Ph.D., Touro University International. 
Trad J. Smith, Assistant Professor of Developmental Studies and Director of 

Student Success and Disability Services (2002), B.A., Milligan College; 

M.T.S., Duke University 
Jeffrey E. Snodgrass, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy (2002), B.S., 

Eastern Kentucky University; M.P.H., East Tennessee State 

University; Ph.D., Touro University International. 
Kenneth L Suit, Ik, Associate Professor of Communications (2001), B.A., 

Baylor University; M.F.A., Ohio University. 
Carrie B. Srvanay, Associate Professor of Communications (1990-1998, 1999), 

B.S. and M.A., East Tennessee State University; Ph.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and State University. 
Charlene L Thomas, Associate Professor of Humanities (1989), B.A., Milligan 

College; M.A. and M.A., East Tennessee State University; The 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 



Institute and State University; Mchigan Technological University; 

University of Oxford. 
Theodore N. Thomas, Associate Professor of Humanities, History, and German 

(1999), A.A., Northeastern Christian Junior College; B.A., 

Pepperdine University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Julia K. Wade, Professor of Biology (1984), B.S., East Tennessee State 

University; M.S., University of Kentucky; M.S. Cornell University; 

Ph.D., The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 
JohnC. Wakefield, Associate Professor of 'Music (1974-1980, 1998),B.A., 

MacMurray College; M.M., Northwestern University; Yale 

University; Emmanuel School of Religion; Fuller Theological 

Seminary; University of the South. 
Gary 0. Wallace, Professor of Biology (1967-1968, 1971), B.S., Austin Peay 

State College; M.A. and Ph.D., The University of Tennessee, 

Knoxville. 
Carolyn M. Woolard, Associate Professor of French (1972), B.A., Bridgewater 

College; B.S., East Tennessee State University; M.A., University of 

Kentucky; D.M.L. Candidate, Middlebury College; University of 

Strasbourg. 



Administrative Faculty 

Beth J. Anderson, Director of the Institute for Student Leadership (2003), B.B.A. 

and M.A., East Tennessee State University. 
Tracy N. Brinn, Director of Enrollment Management (1995), B.S., Milligan 

College; M.A., East Tennessee State University. 
Milton E. Carter, Director of Lifelong Learning (1997), B.S. and MA., East 

Tennessee State University. 
Gary F. Daught, Director of Library Services (2005), B.S., University of 

Florida; M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary; 

Th.M., Union Theological Seminary; MA.-I.R.L.S., University of 

Arizona. 
A. Lee Fierbaugh, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Marketing 

Communications (1994), B.S., Milligan College; M.A., Regent 

University. 
Nathan M. Flora, Campus Minister (1 999), B.A., Milligan College; M.Div., 

Emmanuel School of Religion. 
Mark P. Fox, Vice President for Student Development (1998), B.S., Milligan 

College; M.B.A., Western Carolina University; East Tennessee 

State University. 
William B. Greer, Vice President for Development (1994), B.A., Milligan 

College; M.B.A., East Tennessee State University; Ph.D., The 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 
G. Mary Jackson, Reference and Instruction Librarian (2007), B.A., Abilene 

Christian University; M.L.S., State University of New York, 

Albany. 
Donald R. Jeanes, President (1997), B.A. and D.D., Milligan College; 

M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion; Emory University; 

University of Kentucky at Lexington; Middle Tennessee State 

University. 
Jan E. Loveday, Graduate Admissions Specialist, M.Ed. (2007), B.F.A, The 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville; MAT., Carson-Newman 

College. 
Mark A. Matson, I ''ice President for Academic Affairs and Dean and Associate 

Professor of Bible (1985-1990, 1999), B.S., California State University, 

Humboldt; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion; Ph.D., Duke 

University; University of California, San Diego; Fuller Theological 

Seminary; Shasta Bible College. 
Nathaniel Moultrie, Director of Diversity Services (2007), B.A., Florida A&M 

University; M.Ed., University of Northern Iowa. 
Sue Hilbert Skidmore, Associate Dean, Registrar, and Director of Institutional 

Research and Effectiveness (1980), B.A., Milligan College; M.A., East 

Tennessee State University. 
Stacy R. Tramel, Associate Registrar (1995), B.A., Milligan College; M.S.W., 

University of Kentucky. 
Cindy Wymer, Assistant Registrar and Director of Testing (2007), B.S., 

University of Florida; M.S., Purdue University. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



148 faculty 



Adjunct Faculty 



William A. Albright, Adjunct Instructor of Geography (2005), B.S. and M.A., 

East Tennessee State University. 
Robbie J. Anderson, Adjunct Instructor of Education (2007), B.S., Milligan 

College; M.Ed, and Ed.D., East Tennessee State University. 
Harry C. Arnold, Adjunct Instructor of Communications (2007), B.S., Milligan 

College; M.A., East Tennessee State University. 
Richard H. Aubrey, Adjunct Instructor of Human Performance and Exercise 

Science (1994), B.A. and M.Ed., Milligan College; Ed.D., East 

Tennessee State University. 
Thomas V. Barkes, Adjunct Instructor of Computer Information Systems (1985), 

B.S., Milligan College; M.T.S., College of William and Mary; 

M.S.C.S.E., University of Evansville; East Tennessee State 

University; University of Maryland-Baltimore; Morgan State 

University. 
PaulE. Bayes, Adjunct Instructor of Accounting (2007), B.S., and D.B.A., 

University of Kentucky. 
Fay H Bembry, Adjunct Instructor of Nursing (2004), B.S., David Lipscomb 

University; M.S.N. , Vanderbilt University. 
Lisa E. Buckley, Adjunct Instructor of Human Performance and Exercise Science 

(2006), B.S. Milligan College; M.A., Loras College. 
Justin L Butler, Adjunct Instructor of Applied Music (2002), B.M., 

Appalachian State University. 
David A. But^u, Adjunct Instructor of Music (2004), B.M., University of 

Michigan; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion; Catholic 

University of America. 
W. Darrell Corpening, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (1994), 

B.S. and M.S., The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; M.B.A., 

East Tennessee State University. 
Thomas F. Crawford, Adjunct Instructor of Music (1996), B.M., The 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville; M.M., San Francisco 

Conservatory of Music. 
H. Edward Dalton, jr., Adjunct Instructor of Applied Music (2002), B.M., East 

Tennessee State University. 
JoDee W. Dotson, Adjunct Instructor of Education (2007), B.S., Milligan 

College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina, Greensboro. 
Karen H. Ervin, Adjunct Instructor of Accounting (2006), B.S., The University 

of Tennessee, Knoxville; M.Acc, East Tennessee State University. 
Billye Joyce Fine, Adjunct Instructor of Education (2002), B.A., Milligan 

College; M.Ed., University of South Florida; Ed.D., Nova 

Southeastern University. 
Cherylonda F. Fitzgerald, Adjunct Instructor of Applied Music (2006), B.M., 

University of Louisville; M.M., State University of New York at 

Stony Brook. 
Deborah J. Fogle, Adjunct Instructor of Human Performance and Exercise Science 

(1998), B.A., Bridgewater College; M.A., East Tennessee State 

University. 
Bridget R. Garland, Adjunct Instructor of Writing (2007), B.A., Lee 

University; M.A., East Tennessee State University. 
Thomas P. Garst, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (2005), B.A. 

and M.S., Wright State University; M.A. and Ph.D., The University 

of Tennessee, Knoxville. 
Deborah B. Gouge, Adjunct Instructor of Music Education (2002), B.S.M.E. 

and M.Ed., East Tennessee State University; The University of 

Tennessee, Knoxville. 
Sharon M. Green, Adjunct Instructor of Legal Studies (2007), B.S., East 

Tennessee State University; J.D., The University of Tennessee 

School of Law. 
Troy D. Hammond, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (2004), B.S., 

Milligan College; B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
W. Patrick Hardy, Adjunct Instructor of Political Science (1999), B.S. and 

M.C.M., East Tennessee State University; Tennessee State 

University; Blackburn College; Howard College. 
W. Dennis Helsabeck, Jr., The Henry and Emerald Webb Chair of History and 

Associate Professor of History (1982-1984, 1989), B.S., University of 

Wisconsin-Madison; M.S., Indiana University-Bloomington; M.A., 

University of Oregon; M.A., Luther Seminary; Emmanuel School 

of Religion. 



Thomas P. Homsby, Adjunct Instructor of Public Leadership and Service (2004), 

B.S., East Tennessee State University. 
Patricia F. Huffman, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (2005), B.S., 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.B.A., Milligan 

College. 
Cynthia Humphrey, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (2005), B.S. 

and M.B.A., Milligan College. 
Michael C. Imboden, Adjunct Instructor of Music (2001), B.A., Milligan 

College; M.Ed., East Tennessee State University. 
William David Isaacs, III, Adjunct Instructor of Religion (2007), B.A., Milligan 

College; M.A., Florida State University. 
Adam E. Kneisley, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (2007), B.S., 

Milligan College; J. D., Thomas M. Coolev Law School. 
Laura D. Linn, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (2007), B.S. and 

M.B.A., Milligan College. 
James M. Livingston, Adjunct Instructor of Communications (2007), B.S. and 

M.F.A., East Tennessee State University. 
Samuel C Long Adjunct Instructor of Bible (2005); B.R.Ed., Great Lakes 

Christian College; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion. 
Sharon S. Miller, Adjunct Instructor of Nursing (2005), B.S.N., Lenoir-Rhyne 

College. 
Nicole N. Misterly, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (2000), 

B.S.W., Abilene Christian University; M.H.A., University of North 

Florida. 
James Richard Norris, Adjunct Instructor of Communications (2007), B.S., 

Johnson Bible College. 
R Neal Nichols, Adjunct Instructor of Spanish (2006), B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., 

Louisiana State University; Tusculum College. 
J. Eugene Nix, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1967), B.S., M.S., and Ed.D., 

University of Georgia; West Georgia College; Fort Hays Kansas 

State College; Oak Ridge Associated University. 
Tammy W. O'Hare, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (2001), 

B.B.A. and M.B.A., East Tennessee State University. 
Eric D. Perry, Adjunct Instructor of Bible (2006), B.A., Northwest Christian 

College; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion. 
Joy L Phillips, Adjunct Instructor of Legal Studies (2006), B.A., Milligan 

College; J. D., Valparaiso University; MA., St. Mary's Seminary and 

University. 
Suzanne F. Redman, Adjunct Instructor of Music and the Practice of Education 

(2005), B.S., East Tennessee State University; M.Ed., Milligan 

College. 
Susan F. Rogers, Adjunct Instructor of Education (2007), B.S., North Georgia 

College; M.Ed., Milligan College. 
David H. Sensibaugh, Adjunct Instructor of Business Administration (1991), 

B.A. and M.B.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 

University. 
Allen Sharp, Adjunct Instructor of Political Science (1997), A.B., George 

Washington University; M.A., Buder University; J.D., Indiana 

University; Indiana State Teachers College; Ball State University. 
Ron W. Sheppard, Adjunct Instructor of Occupational Therapy (2004), B.S., 

East Carolina University; University of St. Augustine; Carson 

Newman College. 
Robert B. Shields, Adjunct Instructor of Philosophy (1999), B.A., Milligan 

College; M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., University of 

Kentucky; Emmanuel School of Religion. 
DeniseL Siebe, Adjunct Instructor of Legal Studies (2006), B.S., Milligan 

College; J.D., The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 
Danny B. Smith, Adjunct Instructor of Human Performance and Exercise Science 

(1991), B.S., The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; M.A., East 

Tennessee State University, D.P.T., University of St. Augustine. 
Karen E. Smith, Adjunct Instructor of Applied Music (2003), B.M., Louisiana 

State University; M.M., University of Cincinnati-Conservatory of 

Music. 
John W. Thurman, Adjunct Instructor of Psychology (2005), B.S., Franklin 

College of Arts and Sciences; Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary. 
Russell G. Treadway, Adjunct Instructor of Political Science (2007), B.S. and 

M.C.M., East Tennessee State University; Ph.D., The University of 

Tennessee, Knoxville. 
RitaM. Trivette, Adjunct Instructor of Nursing (2002), A.S.N, and B.S.N., 

East Tennessee State University. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



scholarships and endowments 149 



Tony Wallingford, Adjunct Instructor of Human Performance and "Exercise Science 

(1987-1994, 1995), B.A., Washington and Jefferson College; M.A., 

The University of Akron; Milligan College. 
Ruby Wiseman, Adjunct Instructor of Nursing (2004), B.S.N., East Tennessee 

State University. 
Aaron]. Wymer, Adjunct Instructor of Bible (2002), B.S., University of 

Florida; M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion; Ph.D. Candidate, 

Asbury Theological Seminary. 



Scholarship 
Programs and 
Endowment Funds 



Faculty Associates 



Because Milligan College wishes to continue its relationships with those 
who have given unusual service as faculty or administrators, special 
status has been conferred on the following individuals who are no 
longer serving in a full-time capacity. 

Patricia J. Bonner, Professor Emeritus of Human Performance and 

Exercise Science (1966) 
Rowena Bowers, Associate Professor Emeritus of Health and Physical 

Education (1958) 
Terry]. Dibble, Professor Emeritus of English (1971) 
Phyllis Dampier Fontaine, Registrar Emeritus (1963) 
Charles W. Gee, Professor Emeritus of Biology and Education (1967) 
William C. Gwaltney, Jr., Professor Emeritus of Bible (1964) 
Robert B. Hall, Professor Emeritus of Sociology (1967) 
W. Dennis Helsabeck, Sr., Professor Emeritus of Counseling (1963) 
W. Dennis Helsabeck, Jr., Associate Professor Emeritus of History (1982- 

1984, 1989) 
Ann lies, Associate Professor Emeritus of Humanities and English 

(1975) 
Virginia Laws, Assistant Professor Emeritus of Secretarial Science (1974) 
Loretta M. Nitschke, Assistant Professor Emeritus of Business 

Administration (1986) 
/. Eugene Nix, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1967) 
G. Richard Phillips, Professor Emeritus of Bible (1967) 
Eugene P. Price, Professor Emeritus of Economics and Business (1 949) 
R David Roberts, Professor Emeritus of Christian Ministries (1982) 
Carol A. Roose, Professor Emeritus of Education (1989) 
Nancy S. Ross, Associate Professor Emeritus of the Practice of 

Developmental Studies (1990) 
Donald R. Shaffer, Associate Professor Emeritus of German (1963-1968, 

1973) 
Rosemarie K. Shields, Assistant Professor Emeritus of Humanities (1984) 
Earl Stuckenbruck, Associate Professor Emeritus of Bible (1951-1952, 

1968) 
Evelyn Thomas, Adjunct Professor Emeritus of Music (1976) 
Duard B. Walker, Professor Emeritus of Human Performance and 

Exercise Science (1951) 
Henry E. Webb, Dean E. Walker Professor Emeritus of Church History 

(1950) 
C. Robert Wetzel, Professor-at-Large (1961) 



Endowed Chairs 

The Joel O. and Mabel Stephens Chair of Bible: 

Associate Professor Craig S. Farmer 
The Kenneth E. Starkey Chair of Bible and Christian Ministries: 

Associate Professor Philip Kenneson 
The Vera Britton Chair of Bible: Professor J. Lee Magness 
The Henry and Emerald Webb Chair of History: 

Professor Timothy L. Dillon 
The George and Janet Arnold Chair of Humanities: Professor Jack L. 

Knowles 
The Mountain States Health Alliance Chair of Nursing: 

Associate Professor Melinda K. Collins 

Churches or the individuals desiring information concerning these 
programs may write to the President of the College. 



Foundational Endowments 

These funds have been established by the college and its donors to 
support long-range funding needs in specific areas deemed to 
institutional priorities. The specific initiatives below each foundational 
endowment have been established by individuals or groups. 

The Alumni Scholarship Endowment 

To multiply the impact of endowment funds given by alumni of the 
college for the benefit of students with financial need. 



Class Funds 




The 1968 Class Fund 


The 1985 Class Fund 


The 1976 Class Fund 


The 1986 Class Fund 


The 1979 Class Fund 


The 1987 Class Fund 


The 1980 Class Fund 


The 1988 Class Fund 


The 1981 Class Fund 


The 1989 Class Fund 


The 1982 Class Fund 


The 1990 Class Fund 


The 1983 Class Fund 





The Young Alumni Scholarship Endowment 

Milligan Friends Scholarship 

The Christian Leaders Scholarship Endowment 

To educate Christian leaders for the church and society 
The Kate Taylor Hicks Scholarship 

The Appalachian Scholarship Endowment 

To educate the next generation of leaders in the Appalachian region 

The Athletic Scholarship Endowment 

To educate scholar athletes and advance Milligan athletic programs 
The Milligan College Varsity Club Endowment 

The Associated Ladies for Milligan Scholarship 
Endowment 

To educate the next generation of women for leadership in the church and society 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



150 scholarships and endowments 



Named, Funded Scholarship 
Endowments 

The Akard-McDowell Scholarship 
The Allen Academic Science Scholarship 
The Ira and Irene Atkinson Scholarship Fund 
The Thomas A. Barnard, Sr. Memorial Scholarship Fund 
The Birdy Black Scholarship Fund 
The Kate Rice Blankenship Memorial Scholarship 
The B. E. and Irene E. Boyce Memorial Scholarship Fund 
The Mr. and Mrs. Floyd L. Broyles Scholarship Fund 
The Clarence and Lela Anderson Brumit Memorial Fund 
The Vivian Wells Bryson Memorial Scholarship Fund 
The Ruth Buchanan Memorial Scholarship 
The Charles E. and Florence A. Burns Scholarship 
The Donald E. Bush Scholarship Fund 
The Bill and Pearl Carrier Scholarship 
The Benjamin Morris Chambers, MD, Scholarship 
The Paul and Barbara Clark Education Scholarship 
The Edith Beckler Cottrell Memorial Scholarship Fund 
The Christopher Ryan Cox Golf Scholarship 
The Samuel C. and Mar)' Elizabeth Crabtree Scholarship Fund 
The LTC Michael Crowell Endowed Scholarship 
The Curtiss Scholarship Fund 
The Davidson Scholarship Fund 
The Kathryn Bell Davis Scholarship Fund 
The Jeremy S. Duncan Memorial Scholarship 
The Mar)' and Thurman Earon Memorial Scholarship Fund 
The Edens Pleasant Home Carpet Company Scholarship Fund 
The Elizabethton Newspapers Scholarship Fund 
The Ellsworth- Allen Academic Music Scholarship 
The Harold and Helen Eswine Memorial Scholarships 
The Melvin L. and Rosemary T. Farmer Scholarship for Asian Students 
The W. Edward and Billye Joyce Fine Endowed Scholarship 
The John and Minnie Burns Fugate Scholarship Fund 
The Donald Gaily Scholarships 
The Marvin W. Gilliam, Sr. Scholarship Fund 

The Grant Brothers (Sons of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Grant) Scholarship 
The Archie William Gray Scholarship Fund 
The Sam and Sally Greer Endowed Scholarship 
The Hagan Awards 

The Mar)' Hardin and Lonnie W. McCown Scholarship Fund 
The Del Harris Scholarship Fund 
The Olin W. Hay Memorial Scholarship 
The Fred A. and Daisy A. Hayden Scholarship Fund 
The Naomi B. Helm Scholarship 

The Florence Burns Hilsenbeck Scholarship in Nursing 
The John R. Hilsenbeck Scholarship 

The Hopwood-Hurley Scholarship Fund for Mountain Mission School 
Alumni 

The Leland and Ellen Houser Scholarship 
The Sylvester and Ruth Hughes Memorial Scholarship Fund 
The Gabrielle R. Jones Memorial Scholarship 
The Martha Noblitt Jones Biology Scholarship Fund 
The Dr. Raymond Jones Health Care Administration Scholarship Fund 
The Iula Kilday Scholarship Fund 
The Steve Lacy Athletic Scholarship 
The Genevive Ross Lawson Scholarship Fund 
The Estaline U. Larsson Scholarship Fund 
The Dr. and Mrs. Marshall J. Leggett Scholarship Fund 
The James E. and Elizabeth D. Lewis Scholarship 
The John W. and Lady E. Lewis Scholarship 
The John and Mabel Loguda Scholarship 
The Lovelace Education Fund 

The Lonnie Lowe Memorial Baseball Scholarship Fund 
The Dessie Maddux Scholarship Fund 
The James H. Magness Memorial Scholarship 
The W. T. and Alyne Mathes Scholarship 
The Joe and Lora McCormick Scholarship Fund 
The Joan Millar Scholarship Fund 



The Richard Charles Millsaps Memorial Scholarship Fund 

The W. Hobart and Myra B. Millsaps Scholarship Fund 

The Ministerial Scholarship Endowment Fund 

The Kathryn E. Morgan Mitchell Scholarship Fund 

The James L. Q. Moore, Jr. Scholarship Fund 

The Sarah Nelms Morison Nursing Scholarship 

The John L. and Sarah Jean Morrison Scholarship Fund 

The Sarah E. and Rolina Morrison Scholarship Fund 

The Navy V-12 Scholarship Fund 

The Massey G and Alace C. Noblitt Scholarship Fund 

The Guy and Rhea Oakes Scholarship 

The Gary and Bobbie Porter Ministry Scholarship 

The George and Blanche Potter Ministerial Scholarship 

The Eugene P. Price Scholarship Fund 

The James H. and Cecile C. Quillen Scholarship Fund 

The Forrest L. and Helen M. Ramser Scholarship Fund 

The W. V. Ramsey Ministers Scholarship 

The E. Henry Richardson Scholarship Fund 

The Raymond R. Roach Memorial Scholarship 

The Kenneth L. Roark, M.D. /Martin L. Roark Memorial Medical 

Scholarship Fund 
The Ronald T. and Svlvia M. Roberts Endowed Scholarship Fund 
The Donald G. Sahli Endowed Scholarship Fund 
The Dr. A. Dain Samples Scholarship 
The James and Frances Sanders Scholarship Fund 
The Philip Scharfstein Scholarship Fund 
The Harold W. Scott Memorial Scholarship 
The Howard E. and Mary L. Shaffer German Scholarship 
The Chief Judge Allen Sharp Pre-Law Scholarship and Loan Fund 
The Lone Sisk Scholarship Fund 

The C. Bascom Slemp Scholarship for Lee and Wise Counties, Virginia 
The Ralph Small Scholarship 
The Harry A. Smith Memorial Scholarship Fund 
The Evelyn Widener Snider Memorial Scholarship 
The Ernest K. Spahr English Scholarships 
The W. I. Spahr Fund 

The Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Speas Scholarship Fund 
The Mar)' Stewart, Beulah Roberts and Fydella Evans Scholarship Fund 
The Kathryn Noblitt Story Scholarship in Nursing Fund 
The Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Stump Memorial Scholarship Fund 
The J. Harold and Roxanna Norton Thomas Scholarship Fund 
The Glen and Dorothy Torbett Scholarship Fund 
The Trivette Scholarship 
The Roy True Memorial Scholarship Fund 
The United Daughters of the Confederacy, Selma Curtis Music 
Scholarship 

The Virginia Gardens Christian Church Scholarship Fund 
The F. Lee and Florence Vincent Endowed Scholarship 
The Duard and Carolyn Walker Scholarship Fund 
The W. R Walker Ministerial Scholarship Fund 
The Wendy I. Walstrom Memorial Scholarship 
The Eugene H. and Shirlev W. Wigginton Scholarship Fund 
The Glen M. and Jane H. Williams Scholarship Fund 
The Wiley Wilson Award 

The Ruby Clark Winningham Scholarship Fund 
The Harold and Debby Zimmerman Scholarship Fund 

Unrestricted Endowed Funds 

The John Wesley and Willie J. Allen Memorial Fund 

The Anglin Fund 

The Mary Archer Memorial Fund 

The William E. Axamethy Memorial Fund 

The George Iverson Baker Memorial Fund 

The Ada Bennett Memorial Fund 

The Hazel Hale Best Memorial Fund 

The Dr. H. O. Boiling Memorial Fund 

The Horace E. and Mar)' Serepta Burnham Memorial Fund 

The Philip Clark Memorial Fund 

The Clem Endowment Fund 

The Asa F. and Marguerite Cochrane Memorial Fund 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.mllligan.edu 



scholarships and endowments 151 



The Samuel Compton Memorial Fund 

The Joseph R. Crandall Memorial Fund 

The Adam B. Crouch Memorial Fund 

The A. B. Culbertson Memorial Fund 

The Dr. Joseph H. Dampier Memorial Fund 

The George E. Davis Memorial Fund 

The Oliver C. Davis Memorial Fund 

The Derthick Memorial Fund 

The Milton Edwards Memorial Fund 

The Abe Ellis Memorial Fund 

The Paul O. George Memorial Fund 

The Rev. J. E. Gordon Memorial Fund 

The T. Jayne Gressel Memorial Fund 

The Lois Hale Endowment 

The W. Chamberlain Hale Memorial Fund 

The Hart Endowments 

The Ada Bess Hart Memorial Fund 

The D. Kemper Helsabeck Memorial Fund 

The Hopwood Memorial Fund 

The Sylvester and Ruth Hughes Endowment Fund 

The Rondah Young Hyder Memorial Fund 

The Sam Jack and Mary Ellen Hyder Memorial Fund 

The Johnson City Endowment Fund 

The Ivor Jones Memorial Fund 

The Alfred Keefauver Memorial Fund 

The Fred W. Kegley Memorial Fund 

The Myrtle C. King Memorial Fund 

The John L. Kuhn Memorial Fund 

The Living Endowment Fund 

The Claude R. and Mary Sue Love Memorial Fund 

The Clarence A. and Evangeline K. Lucas Memorial Fund 

The Mr. and Mrs. George Luft Memorial Fund 

The Barbara Main Memorial Fund 

The Dr. Joe P. McCormick Memorial Fund 

The Lee Anne McCormick Memorial Fund 

The John E. McMahan Memorial Fund 

The Hexie McNeil Memorial Fund 

The McWane Foundation Fund 

The Arthur H. and Marguerite Miller Memorial Fund 

The Kelton Todd Miller Memorial Fund 

The Milligan College Memorial Fund 

The Willard and Lucille Millsaps Memorial Fund 

The Carl C. Monin Memorial Fund 

The Mrs. Irene Scoville "Mom" Nice Memorial Fund 

The Clarence and Violet Helen Overman Memorial Fund 

The John C. Paty, Sr. Memorial Fund 

The B. D. Phillips Fund 

The T. W. Phillips Memorial Fund 

The Claude Prince Memorial Fund 

The Mr. and Mrs. Fred Proffitt Memorial Fund 

The James W. Pruitt Memorial Fund 

The Edgar Randolph Memorial Fund 

The Clyde Ratliff Memorial Fund 

The Donald G. Sahli Memorial Fund 

The Dora D. and Nat D. Shoun Memorial Fund 

The Clyde and Hassie Ann Smith Memorial Fund 

The HerschelJ. Springfield Memorial Fund 

The Judge Robert L. Taylor Memorial Fund 



The Edgar Ralph Turner Memorial Fund 

The Aylette Rains Van Hook Memorial Fund 

The Mrs. William Butler Van Hook Memorial Fund 

The Frank and Janie VonCannon Memorial Fund 

The Dr. Dean E. Walker Memorial Fund 

The Dorothy S. Wilson Memorial Fund 

Restricted Endowed Funds 

The Mr. and Mrs. William H. Bowman Memorial Fund 

The Virginia Burns Elder Memorial Fund 

The Frank and Ina Jarrett Endowment for Landscaping 

The J. Henry Kegley Endowment Fund for Technology 

The Gail Phillips Endowment Fund 

The G. Richard and Rebecca R. Phillips Faculty Development Fund 

Special Funded Initiatives 

The Todd Beamer Scholarship in Christian Leadership 

The Janet L. Bobrow Scholarship 

The Excellency of Christ Scholarship Program 

The Dr. Lawrence Noah Gilliam Medical Collection 

The William H. Garst Scholarship 

The Betty Goah Scholarship 

The Ona Laura Hampton Nursing Scholarship 

The Johnson City Press Tom Hodge Journalism Scholarship 

The Howey Memorial Scholarship 

The Wayne and Sylvia Hunter Scholarship 

WJHL-TV Hanes Lancaster Scholarship for Broadcast Journalism 

The Guy and Thelma Mayfield Missionary Scholarship 

The Mountain Mission School Hopwood Scholarship 

The Mountain States Health Alliance Nursing Scholarship 

The Kenneth W. and Jacklyn K. Oosting Scholarship Program 

The Ray and Faith Stahl Nursing Scholarship 

The Ora and Susan Sword Scholarship Program 

The Norma Tetrick Scholarship 

Lectureships 

The Bette Montgomery Fugit Lectures 
The Malcolm and Ruth Myers Lecture 
The Henry and Emerald Webb Christian Unity Lectures 

Trust Funds 

The Hoover-Price Trust Fund 
The Sutton Trust Fund 
The Waddy Trust Fund 



It is hoped that through the years many other funds may be 
established. Anyone wishing to establish such a fund should 
write to the President of the College. 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



152 index 



Index 



-A- 

Academic Programs 34 

Accounting 42 

Accreditation 4, 7 

ACT 14,36 

Administration 145 

Admission 14 

Adult Degree Completion Program 

in Business Administration 56 

Adult Degree Completion Program 

In Child and Youth Development 63 

Advanced Placement 31 

Advisers 27 

American Studies Program 37 

Applied Finance and Accounting 42 

Art 43 

Athletics 12 

Audits 15 

Australia Studies Centre 37 

Automobile 13 

-B- 

Baccalaureate Degrees 34 

Bachelor of Arts 34 

Bachelor of Science 34 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 34, 120 

Bible 45 

Biology 48 

Board of Advisors 144 

Board of Trustees 144 

Business Administration 50 

Business: M.BA 34, 53 

-c- 

Cable TV 29 

Calendar (academic) 2 

Campus 8 

Campus map 154 

Chapel/Convocation 1 1 

Chemistry 60 

Child and Youth Development 61 

Child and Youth Development (ADCP) 63 

Children's Ministry 68 

China Studies Program 37 

Christian Ministry 69 

Classification 27 

CLEP Policy 32 

Coaching 70 

Communications 71 

Complaint Policy 13 

Computer Information Systems 75 

Computer Labs 29 

Computer Literacy Requirement 35 

Conduct 13 

Contact information 2 

Contemporary Music Centre 37 

Co-operative Programs 36 

Correspondence Credit 28 

Council for Christian Colleges 

& Universities 37 

Course Repeat Policy 28 



-D- 

Degrees 

Bachelor of Arts 34 

Bachelor of Science 34 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 34, 120 

Master of 

Business Administration 34, 53 

Master of Education 34, 86 

Master of Science in 

Occupational Therapy 34, 124 

Developmental Studies 36 

Disabilities 29 

-E- 

Early Childhood Education 61, 63, 81 

East Tennessee State University 

Co-Operative Program 36 

Economics 77 

Education 

Early Childhood 61, 63, 81 

Elementary Education 81 

K-12 Specialty Licensure 83 

Master of Education 34, 86 

Middle Grades 82 

Secondary 83 

Special Education 83 

Education Licensure Programs 81 

Emmanuel Co-Operative Program 36 

Endowed Chairs 149 

Endowment Funds 150 

English 93 

Ethnic Studies 35 

Exercise Science 95 



-F- 

Faculty 

Adjunct 148 

Administrative 147 

Regular Ranked 146 

Faculty Associates 149 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. 12 

Fees 16 

Class and Lab 16 

Health 17 

Lifetime Transcript 17 

Student Activity 17 

Technology Access 17 

Film Studies 95 

Financial Aid 20 

Financial Aid Application Process 24 

Financial Information 16 

Financial Registration Policy 17 

Fine Arts 96 

Fitness and Wellness 97 

French 98 

-G- 

GED 1 5 

General Education Requirements 35 

General Science 99 

Geography 99 

German 100 

Grade Reports 28 



Grading System 28 

Graduation Requirements 28 

Greek 100 

-H- 

Health Care Administration 101 

Health Services 12 

Hebrew 101 

Heritage 5 

History 102 

Home School 1 4 

Honors 28 

Human Performance and 

Exercise Science 104 

Humanities 107 

Humanities European Study Tour 38 

-I- 

Information Technology 29 

International Baccalaureate 32 

International Students 14 

International Business Institute 39, 51 

-J- 

Journalism 109 

-L- 

Language Arts 110 

Latin American Studies Program 38 

Legal Studies 110 

Library Services 30 

Los Angeles Film Studies Center 38 

LPN Mobility Plan 121 

-M- 

Majors and minors 40 

Majors exams 31 

Married Student Housing 9 

Master of Business Administration 34, 53 

Master of Education 34, 86 

Master of Science in 

Occupational Therapy 34, 124 

Mathematics 1 1 1 

Matriculation 15, 27 

MCNet 29 

Meal Plan 17 

Mentors 27 

Middle East Studies Program 38 

Mission 1, 6 

Missions 1 1 3 

Music (General Music Studies) 114 

Music Education 115 

-N- 

Non-degree Seeking Students 14 

Nursing 120 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



index 153 



-o- 

Occupational Therapy 124 

f-campus Programs 37 

Organizations 9 

Oxford Summer Programme 39 

-P- 

Philosophy 128 

PCCIS Program in London 37, 38 

Phone service 29 

Photography 128 

Physical Education 129 

Physical Science 130 

Physics 130 

Political Science 131 

PRAXIS II 65, 79, 88 

Pre-law 132 

Pre-medical 132 

Pre-professional programs 132 

Probation and Dismissal 30 

Psychology 132 

Public Leadership and Service 135 

Publications and Media 9 

-R- 

Refund Policy 18 

Religion 137 

Residence Life 9 



Returning Students 15 

RN/LPN Career Mobility Plan 120 

ROTC 37 

Russian Studies Program 38 

-s- 

SAT 13,36 

Scholars' Semester in Oxford 38 

Scholarship Information 21 

Scholarship Endowments 149 

Social Activities 9 

Sociology 137 

Spanish 139 

Spiritual Formation Program 11, 30 

Student Government 9 

Student Life and Services 9 

Student Right to Know and 

Campus Security Act 12 

Student Teaching 79 

-T- 

Teaching Licensure 78 

TELS (TN Education Lottery Scholarship) . 23 

Testing Services 30 

Textbooks 19 

Theatre Arts 140 

Transcripts 33 

Transfer Credit Policy 32 



Transfer Students 15 

Tuition 16 

Tuition Pav/Academic Management 

Services (AMS) 17 

Tutoring 36 

-u- 

Uganda Studies Program 38 

-V- 

Veterans Education Benefits 26 

-w- 

Washington Journalism Center 38 

Withdrawal from a Class 33 

Withdrawal from College 33 

Worship Leadership 141 

Worship Ministry 142 

Writing Competency 36 

-Y- 

Youth Ministry 143 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



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milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



Notes 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



Notes 



milligan college academic catalog | 2007-08 | www.milligan.edu 



MlLLIGAN 
COLLEGE 



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